Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_solar_25_winners.thumb.jpg.fe4e711c64054f3c9486c752d0bcd6f2.jpg

Neiman

DSLR’s - Do I need a full frame ? Can any model be Modified ?

Recommended Posts

Hiya, have absolutely no idea where to begin finding a camera for Astrophotography. And by that I mean - I know I want a canon but am unsure which to buy. It will be a second hand one. Does it need to be full frame ? Can any and all models be modified ? Is a higher pixel count the way to go ? What are the important things to look for in a DSLR ?

any help would be great.

Thanks

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question, can't wait to hear the replies.

I've read that there are special DSLR made for astrophotography named D610 Nikon . Not sure about it though, and it's pretty expensive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I full believe any Canon model can be modified but even though old now I would not want to start pulling mu 1DS mk 2 apart, you don't need full frame though that is nice, APS C like 40,50,60 D models etc would give very god results and is kinder on scopes and flateners, though you would still require one.

As for buying, look for one on here. 1200D 1300 D etc

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Neil

You are definitely asking all the right questions! Canon are no longer at the forefront of astro imaging.  There are incredible images on here from Nikon and Sony cameras, which have new sensors.

It definitely doesn’t need to be full frame, and a lot of optics will struggle to produce a good star field right to the edge of a full frame sensor.

Buy an already modified one and get ready for a lot of fun :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need a modded camera for true colour images.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, tooth_dr said:

Hi Neil

You are definitely asking all the right questions! Canon are no longer at the forefront of astro imaging.  There are incredible images on here from Nikon and Sony cameras, which have new sensors.

It definitely doesn’t need to be full frame, and a lot of optics will struggle to produce a good star field right to the edge of a full frame sensor.

Buy an already modified one and get ready for a lot of fun :)

That's Sony out then. :ph34r:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a video of how to modify a DSLr Camera for Astro. Photography. However. 
things have changed a lot since those days,  and cameras today can do the job well without the need to modify them.
It can be a delicate process, but with care, it can be done.
You will get many replies here, and you must choose what you think suits you best.
Ron.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neiman said:

Hiya, have absolutely no idea where to begin finding a camera for Astrophotography. And by that I mean - I know I want a canon but am unsure which to buy. It will be a second hand one. Does it need to be full frame ? Can any and all models be modified ? Is a higher pixel count the way to go ? What are the important things to look for in a DSLR ?

any help would be great.

Thanks

Neil

The main thing that counts is the QE and the high ISO implementation.
Full frames tend to have bigger wells, higher QE and better ISO implementation.

The negative as already pointed out is that scopes have to cover a bigger frame, it's not normally cheap to do this.
Camera lenses would be better but in the end the best ones are not cheap.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's your budget? If its definitely a dslr you want then I'd highly recommend the canon 600d due to the flip out screen which is a massive help when framing and focusing. There is one on ABS at the moment. 

If you're willing to spend a bit more, you can get a dedicated cmos camera. There's a 183c in the classifieds on here at the moment for a very good price. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Covering a full-frame (ie 24 x 36 mm) won't be cheap, despite what manufacturers would have you believe, according to Olly, even the Tak 85 Petzval won't do it, and if you have that budget then you'd be looking at the real thing, not a DSLR.

I'd stick to APS C or below.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks peeps for all the replies, I eventually want to use the ZWO asi mc pro. But until then I figured on getting a canon DSLR and either modified or modable ( is that even a word ) ? I also want the DSLR to have a flip out screen for easier viewing. I have not got a scooby doo about photography - so that’s photography AND Astronomy that to have to learn, but I watch and listen and ask. Would also like to get a 2nd Hand one with low shutter count. As for budget I’d like to spend a couple of hundred - £300 ish but if I get lured by something I think I want / need - who knows what I cools end up spending on the bloody thing.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that APS-C is most likely a better size to use for AP.. full frame will have much more edge distortion. Another thing I think is better is the size of the pixels. I personally use a modded old Canon 40D. I compared it to a DSLR (7D) which has lower pixels and the 40D was a better performer for AP.....so the bigger pixels are definitely a plus... another bonus is that those older cameras are very cheap to buy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neiman said:

 - so that’s photography AND Astronomy that to have to learn, 

 

If that's the case, then waiting to learn one of them first could be a better option. For both the budget and your patience

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PlanetGazer said:

If that's the case, then waiting to learn one of them first could be a better option. For both the budget and your patience

Yeah, could be the way to go - then again, practice, practice , practice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Don't discount full frame just because the edges may not be fully illuminated. 

There's a very simple procedure that deals with that, it's called Cropping. 

The original Canon 6D has very low noise at higher ISO,  and the big pixels make it more sensitive, but may not match the image scale of short FL scopes. 

But the 600D is very good value. 

Michael 

Edited by michael8554

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Nikolas74
      Recently i bought this brand new camera from David Hardie when he was doing a big sell out of some really nice items in excellent offers !!!
      Unfortunately the camera although brand new doesn't serve my purposes so I decided to sell it at exactly the same price which I bought it from David , it was a really special offer 🤪
      The camera new costs £1685 and I will sell it for £750 to be fair....🤪🤪🤪🤪
      Camera comes with all its extras and case in absolutely brand new condition....!!!!
      Info from FLO site :
      https://www.firstlightoptics.com/starlight-xpress-cameras/starlight-xpress-trius-pro-674c-colour-ccd-camera.html
      Postage expenses are on me, secured package.
      Paypal accepted ,just buyer pays the fees.
      If payment is in EURO we will just calculate the daily exchange rate at Xe.com.
      Many thanks !
      Nikolas.
       




    • By LuminousCRO
      I was looking to get into astrophotography with my 10 inch dobson and for start would like to buy something affordable. Cameras can be used or new. Thanks in advance!
    • By masjstovel
      Hi,
      I bought my first telescope, SW 150pds about 6 months ago with the purpose of astroimaging "when i feel ready".  So far ive used my Nikon D810 for that, and I'm now  planning on taking the step buying my first AP camera.
      My targets would be DSO's, and not planetary. I want a mono-camera, not color. 

      I want to get away with a very good camera to a reasonable price (wouldn't we all...) and in this regard I've been drooling on the ZWO ASI 1600MM Mono for some time. The price for it is in the upper part of my budget, but I'm willing to if its worth it.  I've seen from other treads that sensor-size isn't everything, and dynamic range and gain and all is just as important, but i have trouble understanding it all 100% when it's all new to me, but in my experience i am a practical person who learns things much better and faster with the gear in my hand. So without getting to technical, and staying as objective as possible - please help me with; 

      1. Is this a good camera to go for?
      2. It's sold with options of filters 1.25", 31mm or 36mm - Why these options, and what determines what i would choose?

      3. Would you go for another camera in this price range, and why? - Or to rephrase it a bit; If you were in my shoes, which camera would you og for?

      I'd appreciate any help:)

      I might add, that i understand that with my lack of experience, buying a mono-camera with filters and all might seem premature, but for some strange reason. I enjoy these "way over my head"-projects and figuring  out things as time goes - I just need some guiding in the right direction. 
    • By jambouk
      We are running a session at my local society on transits and occultations. One station will focus on exoplanet transits, and we'd like to build a very simple model to demonstrate this. We have a star (light source) and an orbiting "planet" but I need to work out how to detect the changes in light intensity and display this on a laptop, like a classical transit photometry trace below (taken from https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/tess/primary-science.html).
      Is there a way to take a feed from a DSLR through the USB output to do this, else I could get an adapter for my ZWO and put an EOS lens on the front of that. I really do want a light intensity vs time trace in real time on the laptop. This model will be run in a darkened room.
      Thanks for any comments.
      James
       

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.