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barkis

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About barkis

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    Supernova

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    Male
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    Carlisle Cumbria

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  1. So pleased you changed your mind on Globulars then Sarah. Dismissing them as uninteresting and boring might have put a dent in the admiration you have for your Imaging reputation. Quality Images produced by the likes of yourself, can only be an inspiration for others to take an interest in these unique objects .
  2. An exciting set Images of these Globulars Sara. They are always contained in my observing sessions, and are always drawing gasps from those who see them for the first time in a telescope. Fascinating to visualise what they might seem like looking skywards from any planetary body that could possibly reside in the midst of one. Although, I believe the stars are separated by about 1 light year, at least the ones way out from the central core. Perhaps closer in the central region. .
  3. Way past time for a Venus lander.

    Conditions are too volatile for an extended programme of data collection. The planet is a vile place, and pretty certain that nothing of any value from a science point of view would be gained. Searing temperatures, and Sulphuric Acid Clouds, although the Acid Rain never get to ground level, (It stays in the atmosphere). Tempratures over 450c. I think other than Data from Orbital Spacecraft, Venus is a write off for Surface investigations. I think that is the General take on that, but one never knows what the future holds, especially in Space Research endeavours.
  4. Today's APOD - Congratulations Sara

    From me too Sara, magnificent achievement , and well deserved for this superb work. You must be well pleased, and deservedly so. .
  5. Is this the death of the Powertank

    What works for you can only be good .
  6. A bit far for who Dave, ? can't be yourself as you live in London. I presume you are referring to someone else .
  7. Hah!, the Scutum area of the night sky, one of my favourite observation destinations. Mind blowing density of Stellar Light. The Wild Duck the gem of the clouds nestling within the comfortable pillows of that bed of suns. I remember colour slides too, always full of anticipation, waiting for the results to come back from the processors shop. Mostly disappointing of course, but the fervour never died. I hope the digital age will rescue me from those past failures. However, the picture may have been a let down, but those sights through the eyepiece of my Home built 12" f6 Newt. were joy indeed. You have a nice image there, and a memory stirrer for me, well done, and the best of success going forward.
  8. Is this the death of the Powertank

    I think a definitive answer to the question on this gadget is needed. Is It capable of supporting the power needs of a fully loaded Imaging rig throughout a long data capturing session on a winters night? Mount drive, Focuser, Filter wheel, Cameras, not forgetting Dew straps. How does it react to prolonged Cold Temperatures for instance? It looks very compact for sure, but does everything good come in small bundles? Battery technology has improved enormously for sure, and at the price, this unit looks attractive. But, has it been trialled by anyone ?
  9. New to stargazing

    Good luck in your new way of life Kevin. SGL will certainly be a big help to you in the learning process, as there is virtually nothing that these guys don't know. You can post any queries you may have, and they will be responded to double quick. Once you have immersed yourself in the stars, they too will become your friends, and they won't ever let you down. The weather might throw a spanner in the works, but that happens to all of us. Quite a lot in the UK unfortunately. I hope your night skies are dark, it does make a difference. Best Wishes.
  10. I can but concur with everyone else John. You have done a superb job on this, and it will surely be a popular source for everyone. We certainly thank you for your efforts, and will be very much appreciated by all .
  11. New Telescope design

    Will the views observed be proportional to the size and quality of the scope it is used on? If so, the big Dobs. will be mobbed with one of these piggy backed .
  12. Leaving the entire kit and caboodle in an Observatory, even under lock and key, is a temptation for the would be thief. It may well be a headache removing it to a safer location, but if it is too troublesome, then one could risk it I suppose, but how much of your special holiday with your family could be spoiled by the perpetual worry that must impinge on your mind, and could result in a catalyst for friction, and spoiling everyone's time away in the sun. Some will be immune from the Worry Bead syndrome, but others will be plagued. Thieving is a profitable business for some of the baddies.
  13. Nice concise report MG76. Our Oz. members will appreciate the information you've supplied on these Southern Hemisphere Objects, and us Northern dwellers too will find the descriptions very interesting. Thanks for the time you've donated to us in making your report .
  14. Staff

    It is good here Innit? . Thing is, in not too much time at all, you will be dispensing good advice to others yourself. The essence of SGL is the propagation of It's library of knowledge, to those hungry for understanding of Astronomy's many ingredients. There are no Books or Journals of course, just the vast reservoir housed in the minds of the thousands who inhabit the forum. You are invited to dip into it at anytime you wish .
  15. It's dire times we live in unfortunately. There are those who steal for their means to a high standard of living. The reason theft is such a lucrative way of life for many, is the lack of any meaningful deterrents. Add to that fact, that anyone taking radical means to protect themselves, and their property from these thieving scum life, will certainly reap a far more severe punishment than any Felon brought before our seemingly inept justice system. I personally regard the thief as the lowest form of creepy crawly it's possible to find on this planet, and a very heavy boot can quickly end their career. But, we are deemed to be civilised aren't we? Another joke if you ask me.
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