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Found 156 results

  1. Hello, i am new to this forum, i made my account here because i need help. So few weeks ago i ordered a USB to Serial cable to be able to Control my Telescope with my computer using stellarium. It arrived today. So i made my Star Alignment, then i plugged the cable to my Telescope and Computer, i installed the Cable driver and ASCOM Platform + ASCOM Celestron Driver. I started DriverConnect.exe and put the Celestron Driver i downloaded, and did the properties informations ( had to tick on "Advanced Setup" and "Show All COM Ports" ) and i put "COM8" on "COM Port", then i pressed "OK" and then "Connect" Result: Create Creating device Connected Connecting to device Error System.Exception: Connect to COM1 failed, no Celestron scope detected to System.Dynamic.ComRuntimeHelpers.CheckThrowException(Int32 hresult, ExcepInfo& excepInfo, UInt32 argErr, String message) to CallSite.Target(Closure , CallSite , ComObject , Boolean ) to ASCOM.DriverConnect.ConnectForm.btnConnect_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e) in C:\ASCOM Build\Export\ASCOM.DriverConnect\ConnectForm.cs:line 268 Dispose Disposing of device ReleaseComObject Releasing COM instance ReleaseComObject Completed release. Count: 0 GC Collect Starting garbage collection GC Collect Completed garbage collection "Connect to COM1 failed, no Celestron scope detected" In Stellarium i set-up everything, the plug-in and restarted the app, then added my telescope and i says it's "connected" but i can't find my telescope. Telescope: Celestron NexStar 127SLT The Cable i bought: https://www.amazon.com/Telescope-CP2102-Adapter-Control-Console/dp/B077G37VL1/ PC Specs: Windows 10 Pro, GTX 970, 8GB Ram(DDR4), i7 6700 3.4Ghz Looking forward for your help, thanks in advance, dragorom7.
  2. [A few more photos are in the imgur album] Made this telescope for observing sunspots. The Sun gets projected onto a piece of paper after bouncing from 3 mirrors inside the frame. It's compact, light, takes only a few seconds to point at the Sun, and sketching sunspots is as easy as circling the spots on a piece of paper. It can even project the Moon: The design is inspired by a commerically available telescope, but I’ve done all the designing myself, just for the fun of it. Sunspotter is full of little details that make it interesting. How do you fix the eyepiece in the exact place where it needs to be? How do you keep the lens in place and perfectly aligned? Building the telescope was a lot of fun, I’ve learned to use a jigsaw, X-Carve and a 3D printer. The plan is to use it to complete the Astroleague Sunspotter Observing Program, but unfortunately I completed it at the minimum of a Sun cycle, and won’t see any sunspots until next year. Telescope parameters: Magnification: 75x Size: 41cm x 41cm x 15cm Weight: 1kg Design: Keplerian Projection size: 75mm Materials needed: Lens: Ø52mm f=750mm achromatic doublet Mirrors: 1, 2, 3 Eyepiece: Baader 10mm ortho 1.5m² of 10mm plywood Wooden glue 5m of PLA filament 12 nails Compressed air Isopropyl alcohol Tools I used: Jigsaw with a 30° bevel capacity X-Carve 1000 3D printer A laser pointer Clamp Learned modelling basics in: LibreCAD Easel TinkerCAD Fusion 360 Part 1: Choosing the lens The idea of a sunspotter is that the light goes through the lens, travels inside the telescope, bouncing from 3 mirrors, enters an eyepiece and the image gets projected on one of its sides. The distance the light travels before entering an eyepiece is the focal length and it determines the size of the telescope. I chose a Ø52mm f=750mm achromatic double. Observing the Sun doesn’t require a large aperture, 50mm is more than enough. I wanted a high magnification and went for the longest focal length I could find, which was 750mm. Achromatic doublet design is what people use in refractors. If it is good enough for a refractor, it’s definitely good enough for my project. With the focal length chosen I could design the wooden parts. A drawing showed that the frame needed to have sides 30cm long, but I wasn’t sure about the placement of the mirrors and went for 31cm sides, planning to shorten the light path as needed by adjusting mirror positions. This is the LibreCAD drawing of the layout of parts on a piece of plywood: Part 2: Building the base Having a drawing of the base in LibreCAD, I printed the drawing 1:1 scale on multiple A4 sheets of paper and glued them together. I transferred the drawing to a piece of cardboard and cut it out. Applied this cardboard template to the sheet of plywood, and cut out two parts with a jigsaw.. I’m not an experienced user of jigsaw, and couldn’t manage to cut half-circles accurately enough. Even worse was that the two parts were very different. I didn’t want the frame to randomly tilt left or right when adjusting its altitude, and had to spend a lot of time with sandpaper to make the halves as similar as I could. Glued the two large parts with three small parts in the middle. Additionally nailed the parts and the base was ready. Part 3: Frame The frame is simply a triangle made of three pieces, with short sides cut at a 30° angle. Most jigsaws can cut at 45°, but not at 30°. Had to buy a new jigsaw with a 30° bevel capacity. Cut out three sides, cut short sides at a 30° angle, but didn’t put them together just yet. The lens needs to be perfectly aligned with the Sun-facing part of the frame, otherwise the Sun projection isn't circular but elongated. My solution was to carve a hole with a little step as shown on the image. The inner hole is Ø46.5mm, the outer hole is Ø50.8mm. The outer hole is the exact size to let the lens fit, but with a little bit of friction. Had to carve several holes to find the minimal size the lens could fit in. The step is just large enough to have enough surface for the glue to keep the lens in place, I didn't want to reduce the aperture too much. I used an X-Carve for carving and Easel for modelling. With all 3 sides ready, I could assemble the frame. It appeared that my 30° angle cuts were not very precise, but after some sandpapering the sides started fitting together alright. Glued the parts together and left them to dry for a day. To apply some pressure on the joints, I wound several twine loops around the frame really tight, made sure all sides fitted well together and left it to dry like that for a day. Part 4: Mirrors When selecting mirrors I was looking for the smallest mirror that fit the cone of light. Small mirrors are a lot easier to place, and they let me better control the length of the light path. I considered using elliptic mirrors, but they were bulky and really hard to place. All mirrors are first surface mirrors, otherwise planning their locations would be a lot more confusing. This was my original plan of placing the mirrors: As you can see, all the angles and distances were carefully measured, and I wanted to simply make mirror holders of those exact dimensions. This was clearly a bad idea. I 3d-printed some parts like this: And only later I realized that the frame angles are not exactly 60°, and that there are drops of glue along the edges that don’t let me fit the pieces deep enough in the joint between the sides. I cut angles from all the mirror holders: After I put the first mirror in place I realized the angles are all wrong, and that I needed to re-do the holder. Separating the mirror from the holder was a huge pain, which resulted in an accident. The mirror fell off the desk and got damaged. Luckily, only the back side got damaged, the front side was still working: The final designs of mirror holders looks like this: The holes in the front surface let me apply pressure on the back of the mirror if I ever want to separate it from the holder. The recesses collect the excess glue to avoid mirror skewing when gluing them. All other holes are simply to save the filament. Part 5: Placing mirrors What I learned is that you can’t plan positions of several pieces with high precision and just hope that it all comes together. I needed a feedback about the precision of mirror positions. I used a laser pointer to verify mirror positions at each step. In the picture you can see that the laser is firmly set in a hole in another piece of wood, with layers of isolation tape on the tip of the laser pointer to make it stable. A clamp holds the piece of wood in place, ensuring that the laser ray goes in the same direction as a solar ray would. A crosshair of black thread at the center of the lens ensures the laser goes exactly through the center of the lens. When placing each mirror, I marked the spot where I expected the laser to end up. While gluing the mirror holder to the frame, I kept the laser as close to that spot as possible. If for some reason, the laser couldn’t hit the expected spot, I did my best with placing the mirror, and recalculated locations of the following mirrors. I saw the first sunspots after placing all the mirrors and simply holding an eyepiece in hand. Part 6: Eyepiece holder I tried eyepieces of different focal length and liked the picture I got with a 10mm eyepiece the most. An eyepiece needs to be in a very exact spot to produce a sharp image. At this point it was obvious that my frame doesn’t match the model, and that I didn’t even know what exactly was wrong with the frame. I didn’t want to rely on the model and moved forward with trial-and-error. I printed several parts to hold the eyepiece, with different eyepiece locations: The part in the photo was a total disaster. It needed quite a lot of filament, at the same didn’t have enough surface area to be glued to the frame, and not enough surface area to hold the eyepiece firmly. The next iteration was a lot better: This part has a lot more surface area, and needs less filament to be printed. I intentionally printed the hole for the eyepiece too small, and had to sandpaper it a little bit, to make the eyepiece stay firmly fixed. Adjusting the focus is done by sliding the eyepiece up and down until the Sun becomes a circle with well defined borders. Part 7: Dust All optical parts should be kept clean. Dust on the mirrors and the lens will make the image darker. Dust on the eyepiece will show up as artifacts on the projected image. Unlike sunspots, the artifacts will not move with the Sun. To clean the eyepiece I used compressed air. To clean the mirrors I used isopropyl alcohol. Part 8: Fire safety Don’t leave devices with magnifying lenses lying around. Once the Sun happened to be in such a spot that its light went right through the lens, burning through the cap of the eyepiece. Luckily, nobody was hurt and no other damage was done. Part 9: Future work Build quality of the base is very poor. The frame tilts sideways when adjusting its altitude despite all my efforts. I’d like to build a new base, but leave all the work to the machines. I already have a model for an X-Carve to make both base parts, compatible with my current frame: A notch along the edge of the half-circle should eliminate the tilt. The precision of the machining should make the base very stable. Maybe next year, when sunspots become a common daily sight, I’ll get to this project. Thank you for reading this far! I hope you enjoyed it.
  3. Hi, I want to place a CCD camera where the secondary mirror is, remove the sec. mirror completely. It,s a home made F5 14 inch. Do I have to use a coma corrector or/and a field flattener? Can I use a Barlow with a field flattener or coma corrector, can I use eye piece projection with a field flattener or coma corrector? Many thanks, Markus
  4. Hello everyone, happy Tuesday. First time stargazer here, I'm hoping I can get some awesome feedback from you guys. my fiancé and I are planning on taking a trip to Great Basin National Park from October 25th-30th, we're trying to catch the new moon, we want to do some deep sky viewing but we're having such a hard time on knowing which kind of telescope to purchase. we do have a few must- haves on our purchase, but I wanted to see what you guys recommend and what your experiences have been. we need a telescope that is portable good for deep sky viewing reflector vs. refractor and almost, but not necessarily, easy to use (we have time to learn the ins and outs of it) I apologize if its a lot, but trying to understand the jargon, as of now, is giving me a hard time Cant wait for any responses!! p.s. anyone ever been to Great Basin? what should we expect on our trip? its our first time going and first time doing any serious camping!!! THANKS A BUNCH!!! -LILY
  5. Ladies and gentleman, Thank you for helping me in advance. As a kid I've always been fascinated with the sky and what was in it. The nights sky is filled with beautiful stars and nebulae and I want to see them for myself and be amazed how insignificant we really are compared to this vast open space. So let me adress some of the key points that I want for a first scope. 1. Around €1000 2. Big aperture, I want to see as much as possible and as far as possible while not losing a clear image 3. I would like to have a push to or go to system 4. Beginner friendly 5. Size is not a problem 8. I prefer reflectors since it seems they give more aperture for the money but if you know a better scope that sees more with less aperture let me know 9. I have a Canon 550D and maybe I could use this for a bit of astrophotography. This is last on the list tho and can be scrapped if the first 3 points aren't met Of course build quality is very important when making my choice so keep that in mind as well. I'm looking forward to you guys advice. Happy stargazing and clear skies!
  6. Hi everyone, My partner bought me a second-hand Tasco 302911 and I'm keen to get out and use it. I have read that these are not the best scopes but as I am a complete and utter beginner I'm not too worried about that right now. Can anyone point me in the right direction (to articles, YouTube videos etc) which can help me to understand the absolute basics of setting up and using a telescope like this? I have no clue what any of it does and any instructions I've found are all in a foreign language to me (all the jargon is difficult to wade through rather than the instructions being in French!). Any pointers for a total beginner would be gratefully received. Thank you in advance
  7. I'm trying to buy a 10" or 12" dobsonian and I found this website https://www.telescope.com/ Turns out they have free shipping and can ship anywhere. Can I trust this website?
  8. Hello stargazers! I am a 14.5 year old boy currently exploring the hobby of astronomy! My first Telescope is the Celestron Firstscope! This post is going to contain mostly everything i do from now on! i will occasionally post some tips and tricks as well as some images(rarely) I am soon getting a 8" dob , but that doesnt mean i wont be using the Celestron firstscope. Hopefully, one day i can look back to this and remember the beggining of my journey as i am intrested in studying astrophysics/ astronomy in university . And if not, i will continue exploring this hobby. So Lets start! Astro Journal #0 So this is almost everything i ve done so far, i have had the telescope for almost 3 weeks now and have used it quite oftenly. The first time i used it was in relatively okay skies,i had no idea what focusing was and just looked at unfocused stars for that day.I cant believe i had such ignorance! After i tried finding why the stars were like that, i finally unsterstood the purpose of the focuser! The next day i used it on the cresent Moon, it took me 10 minutes to find with the 20MM eyepiece supplied with the telescope XD. ( even though it was righ infront of me) It was quite nice! I was able to see some craters on it and focusing was pretty good. Then i turned to the 4mm eyepiece.(75x) mag it almost covered the entire fov. For some reason the 4mm eyepiece isnt able to focus very well in general. And it was kind of blurry , but still enjoyable! Here are some pictures i took with it: i continued viewing the moon for a couple of days, then i decided to do some nebula viewing. I was despirately trying to find orion,as the orion nebula was and Is my FAVOURITE Nebula, it took me some time to realise that what i thought was pegasus was actually orion 's belt and sword ?. The night i first observed orion was a full moon night. It took me around 3 minutes to find the orion nebula in the scope. I just happened to notice it because of accidental adverted vision. I ve heard of adverted vision , but hadnt had the chance to use it , until then. I had reasonably high expectations for a 3" reflector, and wasnt sure if i was looking at it or not. It looked like a faint colourless fuzzy blob. After reporting what i saw to the forum they assured me that i had indeed saw the orion nebula.( this all from quite light polluted skies!) Even though i had high expectations i was pretty satisfied with my views. 3 days after, the moon wasnt very visible so i went out to observe. What i saw amazed me. It was considerably brigher than before ,using adverted vision. The idea of looking at the nebula itself in combination with the even better view, astounded me.(in the same skies) I loved it!!!!!!!!!!! After some though i was very suprised that such a cheap instrument(got it for 60euros , but you can usually get it for around 50) can show you that much! Yesterday i woke up to see the moon venus and jupiter( I wasnt able to view the jupiter-venus conjuction because of clouds, same with the Super Blood Moon. Guess i gotta wait another 19 years ?). I was able to find venus before i left for school. it was okay with the 20mm eyepiece. I just didnt have the time to view it in the 4mm( i know the timing was very unfortunate , didnt want to miss the buss) Astro Journal #1 So here we are! Today! I used the telescope in my backyard(they skies are okay! i can make out around 50 stars in my fov (around 180 degrees) I took a view of the orion nebula! You know what they say! You ll never see less than you saw yesterday!(except if the seeing conditions are worse ?) I was able to see quite more using adverted vision than the first time! { For those who dont know, adverted vision is when you dont look directly at the object you are observing ,as the areas in your eyes that focus on something arent as light sensitive as the areas who do not. So this way you achieve better brightness and clarity } Then i took a look at Taurus! i noticed some stars and then headed right for The Pleiades! The Pleiades , filled the entire Fov of my telescope . It had a pretty clear view. I did not however notice any colour or blue tint surrounding the stars. I wasnt expecting much to begin with so that was okay! I took some pictures of the Orion nebula! This pictures indicate what you will see with bad seeing full moon some light pollution and no adverted vision. However, the results with clear skies, adverted vision and no moon will be WAY better , i Promise. Dark skies will help you the most when looking at Deep Sky Objects Also FOR BETTER VIEWS Dont forget to DARK ADDAPT: DARK ADDAPTATION ALLOWS THE EYE TO SEE MUCH FAINTER LIGHT . TO ACHIEVE DARK ADDAPTATION TRY AND SPENDING AROUND 30-40 MINUTES IN DARKNESS ( AND NO CLOSING YOUR EYES FOR 40 MINUTES WONT WORK) And be careful. Even a look at your cell phone will take the dark addaptation effect away. So if you want to see somehow, use red flash torches,as red is the lowest wavelenght in power. The views you will get on the orion nebula will be amazing! Guranteed!
  9. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) by William and John Herschel ......... Part 2. Observations of "Caroline's Galaxy" by Sir John Herschel, 1830's Sir John Herschel, the only child of Mary Baldwin and Sir William Herschel, was born in 1792 when his father was in middle age and already famous as one of world's leading astronomers. Having excelled in school, and no doubt inspired by his famous elders, John Herschel decided upon a career as a 'man of science' and set out to pursue a wide range of interests; with one particular focus being a continuation of the study of the heavens commenced by his father and aunt, Caroline Herschel. In 1820, with the assistance of his father, John Herschel supervised the construction of a new telescope at Slough in England. As described in the extract below ( from a paper presented to the Royal Society in 1826, titled "Account of some observations made with a 20-feet reflecting telescope ... " ), the telescope had a polished metal mirror with clear aperture of 18 inches, focal length of 20 feet and was modelled on the same design created by his father. It is this telescope, in the 1820’s and early 30’s, following the death of his father and the return of his aunt Caroline to Hanover, that John Herschel used to 'sweep' the night sky and extend the catalogue of nebulae and clusters of stars that was published by his father ( see W. Herschel's Catalogue of One Thousand new Nebulae and Clusters of Stars ). On the 1st of July 1833, having complied sufficient observations, John Herschel presented to the Royal Society an updated list of the positions and descriptions of the Nebulae and Clusters of Stars that he had thus far observed. As noted in the introduction to the paper published in the Philosophical Transactions, he had planned to wait before publishing until he had complied a fully comprehensive general catalogue of objects visible from the south of England. However, due to his expectation of “several more more years additional work” needed to complete the task and his assessment that he now was in a position to address, at least in part, the then current “... want of an extensive list of nebulae arranged in order of right ascension ...”, he elected to present his list, “ ... simply stating the individual results of such observations as I have hitherto made ... “. It was not until October 16, 1863, some thirty years later, that Sir John would deliver to the Royal Society his General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars. As well as introducing many objects that had not previously been recorded, Sir John’s list of 1833 included a re-examination of, and in some cases a small correction to, the positions of many of the deep sky objects observed by his father and noted down by his aunt. One of these re-visited objects was, unsurprisingly, the large and bright nebula discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 and recorded in Sir Williams’s catalogue as V.1 / CH 10 ( object number one, of class five ( very large nebulae ) / Caroline Herschel #10 ). In total, John Herschel records around 2500 observations of nebulae and clusters of stars in his 1833 paper; with observation #61 being V.1, the “ Sculptor Galaxy “ . The measured position of V.1is given in RA and the angle from the north celestial pole ( all reduced to epoch 1830.0 ). The description can be interpreted by reference to the legend in the paper. Thus, “ A vL mE vB neb “ becomes “ A very large, much extended, elliptic or elongated, very bright nebula “. He also notes that in addition to this observation, #61, noted down from sweep #306, V.1 was also observed in sweep #292, “but no place was taken”. The figure to which he refers , figure 52, is included towards the back of his paper and is a sketch he made of the Sculptor Galaxy. to be continued ...
  10. Hi All, So we were down at my parent's at the weekend and I've been working on my ongoing project to refurbish my old telescope so my Dad can use it - a Tal M from 1994 (!). Here's a picture of this vintage 'scope: As you can see everything is fine except for the fact that one of the tube rings has shattered in a fall. I need to replace the second tube ring but have no idea how to go about it. The rings are cast iron, and here is a picture of the broken ring for reference: What I want to do is either: Mend the broken tube ring Replace the broken tube ring Find some other way of attaching the telescope to the mount. It's an 88mm / 3.5'' reflector. Really nice 'scope - we gave it a whirl to check the optics and got it pointed at Saturn and it still shows a lovely clear picture. My Dad was careful to keep the tube somewhere the dust wouldn't get to it. Which of the above options would be the best solution to fixing this fine telescope for my old Dad?! DD
  11. Hi guys, I have always been interested in astronomy/astrology and now I'm at the stage in my life when I can do it as I please now having a job ect… I'm looking into buying a telescope, always wanted to so why not!? I have done some revision already and i'm pretty set on buying a reflector instead of a refractor because of the wider aperture, because it admits more light... You guys will know why. I'm still learning and reading about telescopes looking into different ones and struggling to make up my mind on what to buy. My Price limit for my first telescope is no more than £150 for obvious reasons. I'm trying to find the best possible telescope for that price to get me started. I don't expect anything super fancy but my goal is to be able to clearly see the rings of Saturn, see all the planets, other stars, closely observe the moon, see moons of other planets, see other galaxies, nebulae. things like that. I'm not getting into Astro photography yet, purely just stargazing. I have a few telescopes in mind at the moment - Celestron Astromaster 114EQ, I like this because its got a nice 1000mm Focal length and a 114mm aperture, this costs £129.99 Celestron PS1000 Newtonian relector telescope, this has a 127mm aperture and a zoom up to about 270x I think, it has been reduced from £249.99 down to £119.99 Meade Polaris 114EQ, this is similar to the first Celestron but its £10 cheaper but same focal length and aperture. Any help or suggestions on this would be appreciated. Thanks!
  12. Hi, I have a skywatcher 200p dob and was hoping someone would be able to recommend an eyepiece with a wide field of view that would help finding objects and observing larger objects like the Pleiades. I have had a look at an explore scientific 30mm with 82° FOV, but was unsure if it would be good with my scope. Thanks Katie
  13. Hello. So i am very new to the world of astronomy and i just want to stargaze. I would like a telescope to look at the Moon in decent detail and maybe some other planets too and some stars too. I type this to get some help. Below i have multiple options for telescopes. I am on a strict budget, under $50 and i want a telescope that just does the job. i do not need any extreme scope just one that'll do the things mentioned above. Here are the options: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/360-x-50mm-Reflective-Monocular-Astronomical-Telescope-Space-Spot-Scope-Tripod/132194688993?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D43781%26meid%3D9616727f6af84b67ad88a06df4fed9bb%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D152515267398 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Performance-700-76-Reflector-Astronomical-Telescope-NEW-UK-FAST-DELIVERY-/191464648175?hash=item2c942eadef:g:6gEAAOSwBahVaDII http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/900-60-Reflector-Astronomical-Newtonian-Performance-Telescope-60x900mm-Silver-/262966529588?hash=item3d3a06ce34:g:QRMAAOSwurZZNgwR Which one of those will be the most suitable for me and which one would you recommend. BTW, i live in Birmingham, UK.
  14. Good morning everyone, Just to start out, a little about me: I'm US Navy stationed in Sicily, Italy, originally from lower Alabama. I've always been an Astronomy geek, pointing out the stars and planets to friends at night....nothing beats a calm, windless, clean night out in the middle of the ocean. Other than what I've picked up over the years sky watching and reading, I've recently finished up my second semester of Astronomy so I have a decent understanding of the sky....but I know bare minimum about telescopes. I never owned my own telescope and it's been a while since I've looked through one. I did some research and almost bought an entry model celestron a few years bac, but didn't. I like to consider myself beyond beginner, so I'm looking for an intermediate level scope. I've done several telescope finders and seen several reviews. On a budget of under $1,000, but would rather stay closer to $500. I want to see the moon yes, but more interested in the planets and deep sky objects. I will be traveling with it...by traveling, I mean driving about an hour or more to get to a nice dark field. With that I've eliminated a dob, as an option. I'm looking for something that will fit in my car, and a grab n' go/no hassle. My main question is does a newtonion/reflector type require much maintenance? like if I pack it up and drive to spot am I going to be fumbling with it in the dark, trying to get a clear picture? I really want something no-hassle and spend more time viewing than aligning. The reflectors get more aperture for the money over refraction type. Astrophotography is possible, once I get more comfortable and can afford it, ill get a mount, but other than that a simple iPhone snap will suffice. That brings me to my next point, I'd like to explore and would rather spend the money for a good view, than the motorized mounts. Are the motorized mounts really worth it? I also planned on getting a eye-piece/filter kit. So, I've narrowed it down to the Celestron Omni XLT 120mm- the entire Omni line keeps popping up best reviewed/high rated lists; The Orion SkyView Pro 8". Like I said I also plan on getting a filter/eyepiece kit. Any other options or are these good?: no-hassle, decent deep sky/good planet view, $500-$1000 budget (including eye-piece kit), fit in a car. It's my first telescope, so I want the best bang for the buck, not a beginner scope. I'm an adept learner so I'm not scared off by non-computerized mounts (and I want to learn to use without it). Thank you for the help!
  15. Hey I am new to this forum, For now I am going to be heading towards (amateur astronomy hobbyist) till I finish my education and hopefully become an astronomer! I am really interested in astronomy,but sadly I miss the equipment ,My equipment for now is : Strong binoculars My eyes A kids toy telescope well, I really am most fascinated by galaxies and nebulae, so i am waiting (since 8 months) that my mum gets money and buys me a real telescope! So does anyone know any good cheap (100$-300$) telescopes which can see galaxies? If anyone would give me a link to buy it I would really appreciate it!
  16. I am new to using telescopes, and this is my first. I have assembled the telescope and can view an image on a nearby island (in the day) and the moon (at night). I can attach the camera however I just see a black image. I would love to be able to attach my camera to the telescope and capture what I am seeing! Not sure if I need to attach an adapter or fit a specific lens? Any help would be much appreciated! Many Thanks Alice
  17. This is an open project "Ubuntu Astronomy" for amateurs. Free Live DVD distributive designed for astronomy amateurs. This DVD contains different astronomical programs, for example: planetariums, image processing, astro-hardware control, INDI drivers, etc. Based on Ubuntu 16.04. You can download *.iso from its page https://sourceforge.net/projects/ubuntu-astronomy-16-04/
  18. Hi, Bought celestron astromaster 13eq b4 2 days this is my first ever telescope..today for nearly 2 hrs i tried to point to the mars..but i couldn't point..i can see with naked eyes but could not find in telescope..it was very frustrating with eye pain,head pain...can u tell how to locate a star or anything with the s/w..what the numbers are in the eq mount??how to use the s/w and point to that particular object with those numbers??? please help..i saw only moon clearly... Thanks...
  19. I have acquired an old 1960s Newtonian telescope which I am reconditioning as part of my STEM Ambassador volunteer work with a school in Bury St Edmunds. It's currently I my garden but when it's in a fit enough state it will move to the school grounds and hopefully be the seed of a new Astronomy Club in the area. I've already started doing after-school solar system and rocket making/launching sessions, so hopefully the scope will grow the club into something accessible to many children in the area. The reason for the post is I'd like to discover more about the provenance of the scope, so I wondered if any SGL members would be able to help? The primary mirror is 300mm diameter, the secondary elliptical mirror is 63mm (minor dia) by 90mm (major dia). Estimated focal length 1560mm, so f/5.2-ish. The tube is 1.6metres from the back of the primary box to the front of the tube; the front tube is 390mm diameter. It stands on a massive concrete block, angled at 52 degrees, which takes 4 men to lift... So far I have stripped it down, cleaned the bearings and regreased them so it is useable. I successfully collimated it with a Cheshire - first light showed not much coma, so happy with that for now. The focuser is rather tired and it needs at least a RA drive to make it easy to use, and the primary needs recoating. I believe it originally came from Norwich Uni, but I have no details. If anyone recognises this magnificent instrument or knows anything about it, please let me know - it'd be great to share this with the school as excitement mounts! Current state, in need of a lick of paint Original state (old photo)
  20. Hi there, I'd like to get my husband a telescope for his birthday. We're beginners and have a young daughter. We live in Nairobi and go camping a lot and would like something portable that we can take into the bush with us (so fairly robust). I've looked at ratings online and many recommended the Celestron 21035 70mm travel scope, but it got quite mixed reviews. Am less concerned about astrophotography than just looking at the sky. Was also looking at Celestron NexStar 130 but also has a lot of mixed reviews including bad electronics. I'm willing to spend up to $400. Since we live in Kenya, its hard to ship faulty scopes back and forth for repair. Does anyone have any particular recommendations? Want large aperture, robust, portable. Probably refractor. Any recommendations most welcome, thanks.
  21. Hi I have a Sky-Watcher telescope, model AC 120/600 Startravel BD AZ-3 that I want to use to take photographies. This one: http://www.astroshop.eu/skywatcher-telescope-ac-120-600-startravel-bd-az-3/p,16710 I have an "old"(2009 model) Nikon D3100 camera and a t-ring, but the thing is that my camera won't read the t-ring. I read online that it's too old to be compatible with a t-ring. So I wondered if anyone knows about any camera models I can use? I'm thinking about getting a new camera because of this and I would like some recommendations. Which cameras do you know are able to "read" a t-ring? I would prefer the cheapest models Thank you for your time
  22. I could use some expert advice on purchasing my first telescope for astrophotography. I have been using my Canon 5DMIII and an Astrotrac and have decided to upgrade to a tracking EQ mount and telescope. At first to image with my Canon and later CCD. Currently I am considering three scopes: Sky-Watcher ProED (100mm doublet ED APO 900mm FL (f/9)), Meade Series 6000 (80mm Triplet ED APO 480mm FL (f/6)), Explore Scientific (102mm Triplet ED APO 714mm FL (f/7). Any opinions on which would be best for astrophotography of galaxies and nebula? Are there others that are better that I should consider? I have not selected a mount yet but something like the NEQ6. Thanks, Lloyd Linnell
  23. Hi there! (Before reading, my English may not be the best, but I hope you'll understand what I mean and say) I'm currently looking for a telescope that will blow my mind (in a weird way). I've been a "fan" of the night sky since I was a little kid, now I'm 21 years old and I want to give the skies a try. So, the telescop I've been thinking about buying is the Sky-Watcher Explorer-150P(EQ3-2) F/750. To me it seems like a decent telescope for a beginner, but I have my questions to those who are experienced with telescopes and those of you who maybe own their own Sky Watcher Expl. 150P. Questions: 1. Is this a good beginners telescope? Please explain why it is, and why it might not be. 2. What will I be able to view with it? 3. Is this a telescope I can use to take pictures? If so, how can this be done? (Using a laptop or a digital camera?...or both?) 4. Is it difficult to take it with you and to operate it? 5. If you could please rate it from 1-5 (for beginners), where would you put it? Those are the questions I have right now, I might come back with more later. I'm hoping for friendly and informative replies that can help me decide. It's already pretty late here in Norway, so I'll be going to bed now, but I hope some of you can answer me within the next few days. Here's a link to a website I might be buying from: http://www.stjarnhusetonline.se/prod/telescopes/sky-watcher/newtonianreflectors/explorer150.html Have a great night. Much love from Norway.
  24. Hi folks, for all of you interested in Radio Astronomy, you might be interested on this. In the Island of Sardinia is being built a pretty nice Radio Telescope, 64 metres of diameter supporting frequencies between 0,3 to 100 GHZ. The project is financed by the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and the Italian Space Agency. It will be employed for Radioastronomy, Geodynamics and other space-related matters. Its management is shared between Cagliari Observatory, the Institute of Radioastronomy of Bologna, the ASI and others. I think the whole thing is stil not fully operative (the image below is a Live Feed updated every 10 minutes, look at the sky ), but should you spend any of your holidays in Sardinia, you are allowed to visit the site. Website: http://www.srt.inaf.it/ Wikipedia description: http://en.wikipedia....Radio_Telescope
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