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Found 151 results

  1. Hello stargazers! I am a 14.5 year old boy currently exploring the hobby of astronomy! My first Telescope is the Celestron Firstscope! This post is going to contain mostly everything i do from now on! i will occasionally post some tips and tricks as well as some images(rarely) I am soon getting a 8" dob , but that doesnt mean i wont be using the Celestron firstscope. Hopefully, one day i can look back to this and remember the beggining of my journey as i am intrested in studying astrophysics/ astronomy in university . And if not, i will continue exploring this hobby. So Lets start! Astro Journal #0 So this is almost everything i ve done so far, i have had the telescope for almost 3 weeks now and have used it quite oftenly. The first time i used it was in relatively okay skies,i had no idea what focusing was and just looked at unfocused stars for that day.I cant believe i had such ignorance! After i tried finding why the stars were like that, i finally unsterstood the purpose of the focuser! The next day i used it on the cresent Moon, it took me 10 minutes to find with the 20MM eyepiece supplied with the telescope XD. ( even though it was righ infront of me) It was quite nice! I was able to see some craters on it and focusing was pretty good. Then i turned to the 4mm eyepiece.(75x) mag it almost covered the entire fov. For some reason the 4mm eyepiece isnt able to focus very well in general. And it was kind of blurry , but still enjoyable! Here are some pictures i took with it: i continued viewing the moon for a couple of days, then i decided to do some nebula viewing. I was despirately trying to find orion,as the orion nebula was and Is my FAVOURITE Nebula, it took me some time to realise that what i thought was pegasus was actually orion 's belt and sword ?. The night i first observed orion was a full moon night. It took me around 3 minutes to find the orion nebula in the scope. I just happened to notice it because of accidental adverted vision. I ve heard of adverted vision , but hadnt had the chance to use it , until then. I had reasonably high expectations for a 3" reflector, and wasnt sure if i was looking at it or not. It looked like a faint colourless fuzzy blob. After reporting what i saw to the forum they assured me that i had indeed saw the orion nebula.( this all from quite light polluted skies!) Even though i had high expectations i was pretty satisfied with my views. 3 days after, the moon wasnt very visible so i went out to observe. What i saw amazed me. It was considerably brigher than before ,using adverted vision. The idea of looking at the nebula itself in combination with the even better view, astounded me.(in the same skies) I loved it!!!!!!!!!!! After some though i was very suprised that such a cheap instrument(got it for 60euros , but you can usually get it for around 50) can show you that much! Yesterday i woke up to see the moon venus and jupiter( I wasnt able to view the jupiter-venus conjuction because of clouds, same with the Super Blood Moon. Guess i gotta wait another 19 years ?). I was able to find venus before i left for school. it was okay with the 20mm eyepiece. I just didnt have the time to view it in the 4mm( i know the timing was very unfortunate , didnt want to miss the buss) Astro Journal #1 So here we are! Today! I used the telescope in my backyard(they skies are okay! i can make out around 50 stars in my fov (around 180 degrees) I took a view of the orion nebula! You know what they say! You ll never see less than you saw yesterday!(except if the seeing conditions are worse ?) I was able to see quite more using adverted vision than the first time! { For those who dont know, adverted vision is when you dont look directly at the object you are observing ,as the areas in your eyes that focus on something arent as light sensitive as the areas who do not. So this way you achieve better brightness and clarity } Then i took a look at Taurus! i noticed some stars and then headed right for The Pleiades! The Pleiades , filled the entire Fov of my telescope . It had a pretty clear view. I did not however notice any colour or blue tint surrounding the stars. I wasnt expecting much to begin with so that was okay! I took some pictures of the Orion nebula! This pictures indicate what you will see with bad seeing full moon some light pollution and no adverted vision. However, the results with clear skies, adverted vision and no moon will be WAY better , i Promise. Dark skies will help you the most when looking at Deep Sky Objects Also FOR BETTER VIEWS Dont forget to DARK ADDAPT: DARK ADDAPTATION ALLOWS THE EYE TO SEE MUCH FAINTER LIGHT . TO ACHIEVE DARK ADDAPTATION TRY AND SPENDING AROUND 30-40 MINUTES IN DARKNESS ( AND NO CLOSING YOUR EYES FOR 40 MINUTES WONT WORK) And be careful. Even a look at your cell phone will take the dark addaptation effect away. So if you want to see somehow, use red flash torches,as red is the lowest wavelenght in power. The views you will get on the orion nebula will be amazing! Guranteed!
  2. Hi, I currently have a Lunt 50THa and I am looking for something showing more detail and contrast on the sun's surface. I have been considering the new Meade SolarMax III 70 Double Stack, the Lunt 60 with DS (fairly expensive in comparison) and now stumbled across the Daystar Chromosphere. My key considerations: - I love that I can just take out the Lunt at lunch time, put it on a photographic tripod, and I am up and running in about 5min. - When travelling, it would be easier to have one telescope to take with me for day and night use - Cost is certainly an aspect - I do not want to spend more than about 3000 pounds. May I get your input on a couple of assumptions I am making (and which may be completely wrong - sorry, I am not a telescope expert, I just love using them...) - The only purpose of double stacking is to get a narrower bandwidth using (cheaper) filters with a wider bandwidth - by using two 0.7nm filters tuned to slightly different bandwidth the Lunt and the Coronado achieve 0.5nm effective transmission. - A Daystar Chromosphere with a transmission of <= 0.5nm will hence show me the same detail as a Lunt or Coronado Double Stack with a single Etalon - A refractor up to 80mm does not require an additional ERF - A relatively cheap achromat will do - as I am only observing at a single wavelength, the correction for multiple wavelengths really does not make a difference (at least for H alpha) So on that background I guess an 80mm refractor with the DayStar will give me a really good solution am I right? Best Thomas
  3. Hello , I am physics student in Turkey . I have used telescopes but they were manual mount because of that I do not have any experiences with GO TO mounts . I upload photos and I pressed alignment button before finding 3 or 2 stars . Still ı did not find any stars from catalog . I really watched many videos but I did not do it well my process still not continue . 12 photos I upload , first photo teleskop , last photo is the my last step , which button should I have press?
  4. Hi guys, I don't know where I should post this exactly, but I need a bit of help identifying a telescope. Picture attached. Thank you for your tips.
  5. hello this is my polarex 132F (((( https://youtu.be/7gPlOR__86w )))) POLAREX 132F video like New, this telescope pier has no scratches on it \(=,^)/ thank you, telescope from the 1950s
  6. Update: 3rd June Re-processed to remove slight magenta tint caused by the non-uniform removal of light pollution by the DBE process ( it was being fooled by the very bright image centre ). The globular star cluster Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) A full size image can be found here. original below ..... A newly captured ( May 2018 ) image of the great southern globular star cluster, Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus - ( please click / tap image to see larger and sharper ) A full size ( ~ 6000 x 4000 ) image can be found here ....... This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the colours of the stars, including in the core. Image details: Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( up is North ) Focal ............. 1375.99 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 20.9" x 38' 55.1" Image center ...... RA: 13 26 45.065 Dec: -47 28 27.26 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher Eq8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)\ Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( May 2018 ) 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  7. Hi guys, I have always been interested in astronomy/astrology and now I'm at the stage in my life when I can do it as I please now having a job ect… I'm looking into buying a telescope, always wanted to so why not!? I have done some revision already and i'm pretty set on buying a reflector instead of a refractor because of the wider aperture, because it admits more light... You guys will know why. I'm still learning and reading about telescopes looking into different ones and struggling to make up my mind on what to buy. My Price limit for my first telescope is no more than £150 for obvious reasons. I'm trying to find the best possible telescope for that price to get me started. I don't expect anything super fancy but my goal is to be able to clearly see the rings of Saturn, see all the planets, other stars, closely observe the moon, see moons of other planets, see other galaxies, nebulae. things like that. I'm not getting into Astro photography yet, purely just stargazing. I have a few telescopes in mind at the moment - Celestron Astromaster 114EQ, I like this because its got a nice 1000mm Focal length and a 114mm aperture, this costs £129.99 Celestron PS1000 Newtonian relector telescope, this has a 127mm aperture and a zoom up to about 270x I think, it has been reduced from £249.99 down to £119.99 Meade Polaris 114EQ, this is similar to the first Celestron but its £10 cheaper but same focal length and aperture. Any help or suggestions on this would be appreciated. Thanks!
  8. Hi, I have a skywatcher 200p dob and was hoping someone would be able to recommend an eyepiece with a wide field of view that would help finding objects and observing larger objects like the Pleiades. I have had a look at an explore scientific 30mm with 82° FOV, but was unsure if it would be good with my scope. Thanks Katie
  9. Hello, I'm looking to get myself a new telescope to get back outside and looking up. I currently have a Celestron Astromaster 130eq, however, I do not use it as much as it broke in a way where the mount and knobs cannot be fixed. I did enjoy using it, but now I am looking for a more convenient scope to use. I'm looking at smaller goto scopes around $400. I want to be able to take it with me anywhere, set it up in minutes, and get to observing without much hassle (punch in an object and have it be tracked). I'm currently looking at the two scopes below: Celestron NexStar 4se Celestron NexStar 130 SLT I realized the 130 is the same size as my current scope, but with its goto factor, I feel like I would use it a lot more. The 4se is very appealing due to its small form factor. In addition to the Solar System, I would like to be able to see some DSOs. As for the price, $400 is my comfort zone at the moment, but I'll consider going up or down based on recommendations. If anyone has any experience with the scopes above, or has a recommendation, please share your input. I would love to hear it as I really want to get back outside and observing. Thanks, Spriggs
  10. Hello. I am using a Orion xt8 reflector telescope. I am wondering what optic / eyepiece set up I should be using for a mix of DSO and planets. I have a couple pictures which I have taken with honestly my cell phone on one of those (Omi cellphone adaptors for telescope) and they pictures don't come out to bad... but I am looking for something that I can actually put into the eye piece that will give decent looking pictures, or even one that I can hook up to my computer and look through it live. Price really is not the biggest issue but not really looking for something over $400. I know there might not be such a thing as I am describing. most of these pictures were taken with a 2x barlow and a 20mm The ones of mars I just took with a 5x barlo and the same 20mm. and I am unsure what this star formation I took a picture of is but It looked pretty cool and I am glad that I was able to take a picture of it.. But just looking for some help choosing what camera would be best. (Obviously using the phone camera the objects appear so bright and there is no way to pull the actual detail of the planet into focus for me) But any help would be great :) Thank you for any feedback you have and I cant wait to become more active on this forum!
  11. Hi, I am a beginner I am wondering what telescope should I buy. It will be my second one, my first one was about £50 and I could see the moon very well with it. Things I am looking for in my next telescope. 1) Not more than £240 2) Gives clear view of Jupiter, Mars, Moon, Saturn Thank you.
  12. Hello I bought my first telescope last year (Celestron Nextar Evo 8), I've used it several times already and never had any problem with moving it/putting it together. Last night I was out doing some photography with my scope and at one point my glove came in contact with the corrector plate. I noticed a small smudge when I came back in. As it's my first scope I've tried to be very careful and got a little scared that it would affect the performance of it. Looking for a professional opinion on this. Does this need to be cleaned? Will it make a difference in my photography/visual? Added two pictures. Regards Brant
  13. Looks like my Lipo project so far may be working good, ran a trial last night with a 3200Mah 3 cell Lipo from my RC airplane, the battery is an 11.1V nominal charge (uncharged) but charges up to 12.6V (4.2V per cell fully charged). All Lipo batteries display nominal charge capacity, which can be misleading because when charged, they jump up in voltage past displayed voltage. I wanted to see how long that went for before using one of my larger 5000Mah batts, didn’t take much more than $5 for a 2.5mm connector with 6ft cable included and a Deans connector on other end for the battery. I have a small voltage meter we RC guys use to monitor battery levels per cell and combined voltage, meter just keeps displaying levels constantly then emits a buzz when it drops to pre programmed level. The loud buzz I muffled to a pitiful hum by dropping some hot glue over the little speaker holes, last thing I need is an 80 decibel buzz at 2am in my yard. I set buzz for 3.5V per cell which is lowest you want to drain a Lipo per cell, after slewing around manually more times than I can remember I still had enough juice to slew around for another hour if i wanted, I was mimicking a nights slewing around and I think after I slewed around on both axis simultaneously on and off for 40 min I pretty much covered a nights worth. the test will be in the field, if this battery doesn’t cut it I’m sure the 5000Mah will do the trick. I was watching for any shenanigans from the scope as the level dropped but nothing, no glitches or twitching of the controller display, all remained solid. UPDATE: The next morning i turned on the scope (without recharging battery) and again spent the better part of an hour until i was just bored slewing the scope around, i was afraid to burn out a motor with constant back and forth slewing with a short pause of course. i am now convinced that this 3200mah battery not much bigger than the average candy bar will last a whole night out and more! fantastic to know that when i drag the scope out for short periods locally (won't need heat strip those times) that this battery will be fine. i was dreading having to take my 50Lb deep cycle marine battery every time id like to go for a short local 2hr outreach session, on those long drive dark sky all night sessions yes i will need heat and my marine battery but those a few compared to short local sessions. I can now fit my power supply into my pocket and that is just GOLD!!
  14. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) by William and John Herschel ......... Part 2. Observations of "Caroline's Galaxy" by Sir John Herschel, 1830's Sir John Herschel, the only child of Mary Baldwin and Sir William Herschel, was born in 1792 when his father was in middle age and already famous as one of world's leading astronomers. Having excelled in school, and no doubt inspired by his famous elders, John Herschel decided upon a career as a 'man of science' and set out to pursue a wide range of interests; with one particular focus being a continuation of the study of the heavens commenced by his father and aunt, Caroline Herschel. In 1820, with the assistance of his father, John Herschel supervised the construction of a new telescope at Slough in England. As described in the extract below ( from a paper presented to the Royal Society in 1826, titled "Account of some observations made with a 20-feet reflecting telescope ... " ), the telescope had a polished metal mirror with clear aperture of 18 inches, focal length of 20 feet and was modelled on the same design created by his father. It is this telescope, in the 1820’s and early 30’s, following the death of his father and the return of his aunt Caroline to Hanover, that John Herschel used to 'sweep' the night sky and extend the catalogue of nebulae and clusters of stars that was published by his father ( see W. Herschel's Catalogue of One Thousand new Nebulae and Clusters of Stars ). On the 1st of July 1833, having complied sufficient observations, John Herschel presented to the Royal Society an updated list of the positions and descriptions of the Nebulae and Clusters of Stars that he had thus far observed. As noted in the introduction to the paper published in the Philosophical Transactions, he had planned to wait before publishing until he had complied a fully comprehensive general catalogue of objects visible from the south of England. However, due to his expectation of “several more more years additional work” needed to complete the task and his assessment that he now was in a position to address, at least in part, the then current “... want of an extensive list of nebulae arranged in order of right ascension ...”, he elected to present his list, “ ... simply stating the individual results of such observations as I have hitherto made ... “. It was not until October 16, 1863, some thirty years later, that Sir John would deliver to the Royal Society his General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars. As well as introducing many objects that had not previously been recorded, Sir John’s list of 1833 included a re-examination of, and in some cases a small correction to, the positions of many of the deep sky objects observed by his father and noted down by his aunt. One of these re-visited objects was, unsurprisingly, the large and bright nebula discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 and recorded in Sir Williams’s catalogue as V.1 / CH 10 ( object number one, of class five ( very large nebulae ) / Caroline Herschel #10 ). In total, John Herschel records around 2500 observations of nebulae and clusters of stars in his 1833 paper; with observation #61 being V.1, the “ Sculptor Galaxy “ . The measured position of V.1is given in RA and the angle from the north celestial pole ( all reduced to epoch 1830.0 ). The description can be interpreted by reference to the legend in the paper. Thus, “ A vL mE vB neb “ becomes “ A very large, much extended, elliptic or elongated, very bright nebula “. He also notes that in addition to this observation, #61, noted down from sweep #306, V.1 was also observed in sweep #292, “but no place was taken”. The figure to which he refers , figure 52, is included towards the back of his paper and is a sketch he made of the Sculptor Galaxy. to be continued ...
  15. rob1

    Skywatcher Explorer 200p

    From the album: Astro pics

  16. Hi All, So we were down at my parent's at the weekend and I've been working on my ongoing project to refurbish my old telescope so my Dad can use it - a Tal M from 1994 (!). Here's a picture of this vintage 'scope: As you can see everything is fine except for the fact that one of the tube rings has shattered in a fall. I need to replace the second tube ring but have no idea how to go about it. The rings are cast iron, and here is a picture of the broken ring for reference: What I want to do is either: Mend the broken tube ring Replace the broken tube ring Find some other way of attaching the telescope to the mount. It's an 88mm / 3.5'' reflector. Really nice 'scope - we gave it a whirl to check the optics and got it pointed at Saturn and it still shows a lovely clear picture. My Dad was careful to keep the tube somewhere the dust wouldn't get to it. Which of the above options would be the best solution to fixing this fine telescope for my old Dad?! DD
  17. Hello. So i am very new to the world of astronomy and i just want to stargaze. I would like a telescope to look at the Moon in decent detail and maybe some other planets too and some stars too. I type this to get some help. Below i have multiple options for telescopes. I am on a strict budget, under $50 and i want a telescope that just does the job. i do not need any extreme scope just one that'll do the things mentioned above. Here are the options: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/360-x-50mm-Reflective-Monocular-Astronomical-Telescope-Space-Spot-Scope-Tripod/132194688993?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D43781%26meid%3D9616727f6af84b67ad88a06df4fed9bb%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D152515267398 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Performance-700-76-Reflector-Astronomical-Telescope-NEW-UK-FAST-DELIVERY-/191464648175?hash=item2c942eadef:g:6gEAAOSwBahVaDII http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/900-60-Reflector-Astronomical-Newtonian-Performance-Telescope-60x900mm-Silver-/262966529588?hash=item3d3a06ce34:g:QRMAAOSwurZZNgwR Which one of those will be the most suitable for me and which one would you recommend. BTW, i live in Birmingham, UK.
  18. Good morning everyone, Just to start out, a little about me: I'm US Navy stationed in Sicily, Italy, originally from lower Alabama. I've always been an Astronomy geek, pointing out the stars and planets to friends at night....nothing beats a calm, windless, clean night out in the middle of the ocean. Other than what I've picked up over the years sky watching and reading, I've recently finished up my second semester of Astronomy so I have a decent understanding of the sky....but I know bare minimum about telescopes. I never owned my own telescope and it's been a while since I've looked through one. I did some research and almost bought an entry model celestron a few years bac, but didn't. I like to consider myself beyond beginner, so I'm looking for an intermediate level scope. I've done several telescope finders and seen several reviews. On a budget of under $1,000, but would rather stay closer to $500. I want to see the moon yes, but more interested in the planets and deep sky objects. I will be traveling with it...by traveling, I mean driving about an hour or more to get to a nice dark field. With that I've eliminated a dob, as an option. I'm looking for something that will fit in my car, and a grab n' go/no hassle. My main question is does a newtonion/reflector type require much maintenance? like if I pack it up and drive to spot am I going to be fumbling with it in the dark, trying to get a clear picture? I really want something no-hassle and spend more time viewing than aligning. The reflectors get more aperture for the money over refraction type. Astrophotography is possible, once I get more comfortable and can afford it, ill get a mount, but other than that a simple iPhone snap will suffice. That brings me to my next point, I'd like to explore and would rather spend the money for a good view, than the motorized mounts. Are the motorized mounts really worth it? I also planned on getting a eye-piece/filter kit. So, I've narrowed it down to the Celestron Omni XLT 120mm- the entire Omni line keeps popping up best reviewed/high rated lists; The Orion SkyView Pro 8". Like I said I also plan on getting a filter/eyepiece kit. Any other options or are these good?: no-hassle, decent deep sky/good planet view, $500-$1000 budget (including eye-piece kit), fit in a car. It's my first telescope, so I want the best bang for the buck, not a beginner scope. I'm an adept learner so I'm not scared off by non-computerized mounts (and I want to learn to use without it). Thank you for the help!
  19. Hey I am new to this forum, For now I am going to be heading towards (amateur astronomy hobbyist) till I finish my education and hopefully become an astronomer! I am really interested in astronomy,but sadly I miss the equipment ,My equipment for now is : Strong binoculars My eyes A kids toy telescope well, I really am most fascinated by galaxies and nebulae, so i am waiting (since 8 months) that my mum gets money and buys me a real telescope! So does anyone know any good cheap (100$-300$) telescopes which can see galaxies? If anyone would give me a link to buy it I would really appreciate it!
  20. I am new to using telescopes, and this is my first. I have assembled the telescope and can view an image on a nearby island (in the day) and the moon (at night). I can attach the camera however I just see a black image. I would love to be able to attach my camera to the telescope and capture what I am seeing! Not sure if I need to attach an adapter or fit a specific lens? Any help would be much appreciated! Many Thanks Alice
  21. This is an open project "Ubuntu Astronomy" for amateurs. Free Live DVD distributive designed for astronomy amateurs. This DVD contains different astronomical programs, for example: planetariums, image processing, astro-hardware control, INDI drivers, etc. Based on Ubuntu 16.04. You can download *.iso from its page https://sourceforge.net/projects/ubuntu-astronomy-16-04/
  22. Hi, Bought celestron astromaster 13eq b4 2 days this is my first ever telescope..today for nearly 2 hrs i tried to point to the mars..but i couldn't point..i can see with naked eyes but could not find in telescope..it was very frustrating with eye pain,head pain...can u tell how to locate a star or anything with the s/w..what the numbers are in the eq mount??how to use the s/w and point to that particular object with those numbers??? please help..i saw only moon clearly... Thanks...
  23. I have acquired an old 1960s Newtonian telescope which I am reconditioning as part of my STEM Ambassador volunteer work with a school in Bury St Edmunds. It's currently I my garden but when it's in a fit enough state it will move to the school grounds and hopefully be the seed of a new Astronomy Club in the area. I've already started doing after-school solar system and rocket making/launching sessions, so hopefully the scope will grow the club into something accessible to many children in the area. The reason for the post is I'd like to discover more about the provenance of the scope, so I wondered if any SGL members would be able to help? The primary mirror is 300mm diameter, the secondary elliptical mirror is 63mm (minor dia) by 90mm (major dia). Estimated focal length 1560mm, so f/5.2-ish. The tube is 1.6metres from the back of the primary box to the front of the tube; the front tube is 390mm diameter. It stands on a massive concrete block, angled at 52 degrees, which takes 4 men to lift... So far I have stripped it down, cleaned the bearings and regreased them so it is useable. I successfully collimated it with a Cheshire - first light showed not much coma, so happy with that for now. The focuser is rather tired and it needs at least a RA drive to make it easy to use, and the primary needs recoating. I believe it originally came from Norwich Uni, but I have no details. If anyone recognises this magnificent instrument or knows anything about it, please let me know - it'd be great to share this with the school as excitement mounts! Current state, in need of a lick of paint Original state (old photo)
  24. Hi there, I'd like to get my husband a telescope for his birthday. We're beginners and have a young daughter. We live in Nairobi and go camping a lot and would like something portable that we can take into the bush with us (so fairly robust). I've looked at ratings online and many recommended the Celestron 21035 70mm travel scope, but it got quite mixed reviews. Am less concerned about astrophotography than just looking at the sky. Was also looking at Celestron NexStar 130 but also has a lot of mixed reviews including bad electronics. I'm willing to spend up to $400. Since we live in Kenya, its hard to ship faulty scopes back and forth for repair. Does anyone have any particular recommendations? Want large aperture, robust, portable. Probably refractor. Any recommendations most welcome, thanks.
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