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MarsG76

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Everything posted by MarsG76

  1. I had a look at your pictures and they're great... with a upgrade to a cooled mono camera you'd basically increase resolution and capture the same amount of data in around 1/3rd of the time.... might have less noise too... but overall you wouldn't find a quantum leap in improvement as you're still limited by your sky.... ultimately It's a decision where you want spend the money not need to to enter the next level of astrophotography.... My justification was to get it was for (hopefully near) future "F2 Fastar" imaging on my C8 that I wouldn't be able to do successfully with the DSLR (c
  2. I completely understand.. it's a expensive jump and if you're happy with the DSLR... which I know can deliver awesome images.... than there is no hurry to upgrade.... getting a smaller sensor is really a step back IMHO.
  3. Great report.... I agree that Jupiter and Saturn are fantastic views during clarity.... along with Mars during clear opposition time... I remember when I could view Jupiter and Saturn at 406X during a clearest night and the view was staggering.. I couldn't take my eye off the eyepiece.... the planets were massive and the amount of detail in the planets was photographic. This was through my C8... once through the 14" dob I had a view of Jupiter at 480X with the GRS that was sharp as a tack... the GRS was surrounded with fine detailed cloudband and had a darker speck visible within.. the
  4. AWESOME images.. although my favourite is the HaRGB version.... superb.
  5. If you get a 8" SCT on CGEM mount and a f6.3 focal reducer, I can guarantee that you will not be looking to upgrade your scope for a long time.... The C8 is my first serious and still my favorite scope.... views are awesome and the images I take through it make me happy... an 8" SCT is the scope that is the "jack of all trades" and does those trades very well.... Its powerful, small and delivers great planetary & lunar details (weather permitting). as well as opens Deep space to the eye. PS: I do not have shares in any 8" or other telescope manufacturer, I just love my C8-CGEM combo.
  6. From the album: Solar System Objects

    There was a (near) total lunar eclipse last week and I happened to be lucky enough to be on the right side of the planet to see it in it's entirety.... These images were taken with a stock Canon 7D DSLR attached to my 14" Skywatcher GOTO Dobsonian and I had my 8" SCT setup to observe it along with the binoculars... what a fantastic night. I'll tell you that the eclipsed moon viewed through the C8 with the TV 31mm Nagler Type 5 eyepiece is a amazing sight... the full disc of the rusty moon, some stars sprinkled around it and witnessing a star being occulted by the red moon was somethi

    © Mariusz Goralski

  7. MarsG76

    Solar System Objects

    Planet & Solar System Images taken through a 8" SCT using various cameras and barlow lens combinations as stated in the description of each photo.
  8. Hello Astronomers, There was a (near) total lunar eclipse last week and I happened to be lucky enough to be on the right side of the planet to see it in it's entirety.... These images were taken with a stock Canon 7D DSLR attached to my 14" Skywatcher GOTO Dobsonian.... I had my 8" SCT setup to observe it along with the binoculars... what a fantastic night. I'll tell you that the eclipsed moon viewed through the C8 with the TV 31mm Nagler Type 5 eyepiece is a amazing sight... the full disc of the rusty moon, some stars sprinkled around it and witnessing a star being occulted by
  9. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    This is my first image created using my new camera. This is NGC3603 and NGC3576 (AKA The "Statue of Liberty" nebula), a massive H-Alpha region containing a very compact open cluster, located in the constellation "Carina" about 20,000LY away. I took this photo on multiple nights, between 7th - 17th May 2021. Imaged using a QHY268M attached to a 80mm f6.25 refractor on a equatorial mount. Total exposure time was 25 Hours and 35 minutes using 7nm HII, OIII and SII Narrowband filters... imaged from a bortle 4-5 semi rural sky. HII: 3x600s, 12x900s & 8x1200s subs

    © Mariusz Goralski

  10. MarsG76

    Deep Sky Imaging

    Collection of my Deep Space objects. These images have been take through a 8" SCT or 80mm refractor using a full spectrum modded Canon 40D (as stated in the description of each photo).
  11. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) also known as the Grand Nebula, Great Nebula in Carina, or Eta Carinae Nebula, is a large complex area of bright and dark nebulosity in the constellation Carina. The nebula lies at an estimated distance between 6,500 and 10,000 light-years from Earth. This image was taken from my backyard in Bortle 4-5 skies through a 80mm refractor at F6.25 (500mm focal length) with a QHY268M camera through 7nm H-Alpha, SII and OIII filters. Total exposure time was 5 hour and 50 minutes. Subs captured were HII: 12x600s OIII: 2x600s & 4x900s SII: 10x900s @ HCG:62

    © Mariusz Goralski

  12. Hello Steve, Thinking long and hard about such an upgrade is a normal thing since it's not cheap and can also create doubt and second thoughts of the expense if you're convinced of spending all that money for no, or very little improvement in images... but as you can see, there is improvement over even a very modded DSLR altered for the job. I modded and cooled the 40D myself... if you're interested, I wrote of my experience in this thread: .
  13. Thank you... I'm very happy with the result.... the new camera is definitely a marked improvement.. than again we're talking about 15 years newer tech, newer sensor, higher resolution, more sensitive and mono...
  14. This is a unscaled 1:1 pixel comparison between the same nebula imaged with the QHY268M and my Modded and Cooled Canon 40D. Unlike the last side to side comparison where I scaled down the QHY image, this image is a crop of the actual resolution and detail capture by both cameras. Images were exposed for a similar duration, through same filters, through the same telescope and at the same focal length. The result of the comparison and the detail increase really should be no surprise when thinking about the technical aspects of the two sensors. Using the H-Alpha or SII filt
  15. I agree... DSLR imaging is great... and can definitely deliver beautiful images.
  16. Hi Steve, You're welcome... I hope that this helps astroimagers with the decision of whether it's worth (for them) going to a dedicated astrocamera with a real world use comparison that simplifies the choice without mudding the facts with numbers and test bench specs. I couldn't find anything online that compared (real world or other use) any dedicated astrocams to DSLRs that were cooled as well as modded so this might be useful, and upgrading from stock to modded to cooled and modded than to the QHY allows me to share some of my experiences and real results over the years. Bot
  17. Hi All, This is my second image taken with the new QHY268M camera and I think that this is the most detailed, and quite possibly my best, DSO image to date. The Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) also known as the Grand Nebula, Great Nebula in Carina, or Eta Carinae Nebula, is a large complex area of bright and dark nebulosity in the constellation Carina. The nebula lies at an estimated distance between 6,500 and 10,000 light-years from Earth. This image was taken from my backyard in Bortle 4-5 skies through a 80mm refractor at F6.25 (500mm focal length) with a QHY268M camera through 7nm
  18. Hi All, I've competed the comparison image that I set out to do initially with the start of this post. Both images were taken using the same telescope and mount, and only 3 months apart, with almost the same exposure time spent for both images, so It's a close comparison. Below are the full resolution image from the QHY camera... ...and the full resolution modded and Cooled Canon 40D image. The scale of the two images are different due to the pixel size differences between the cameras so below is a crop and rescale of images taken with both cameras
  19. You again... thanks for making me laugh... what are you talking about? Go else where, no answers needed.
  20. Also have a read of my PEC experience... now this might be a coincidence but worth noting as it did happen... https://stargazerslounge.com/topic/336050-my-cgem-mount-sudden-death/?tab=comments#comment-3657266
  21. Hi John, I played with PEC on my CGEM a couple of years ago and even though I got it working, I didn't find the difference to be substantial enough to be worth while when autoguiding through an OAG and PHD2. The slightly lower correction and RMS figure could easily have been better seeing... That said, perhaps unguided imaging would see a benefit? MG
  22. Hello all... O K... I had my first real comparison between the cameras and I was wrong... boy was I WRONG... after calibrating and stacking the subs, the QHY runs rings around the 40D... I managed to get 10 x 900 second HAlpha subs at HGC gain 62, juggling between clouds, generated some flats, bias and darks and below is the (very quickly processed) result. Below is a comparison of my HAlpha image taken with the 40D in February full res, next to a crop (and scaled down to 60%) of the image taken with the QHYCCD. Scaled down for comparison reasons because of the smaller pi
  23. That is true, and I am comparing ISO1600 of the Canon 40D with ISO settings capability between 100 to 3200.... and the QHY raw at gain 56 on a scale that 1-100... both at half way in their gain settings... I'm aware of the different technologies applied.. a 14 year old camera vs the latest sensor with HGC capability and the more I play with it, the more I see the benefits. But out of the camera the 40D shows nebulosity and structure where as the QHY raw seems to be more crushed and shows not much more than a few stars... raw without gain applied?
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