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MarsG76

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Everything posted by MarsG76

  1. Both are great for viewing nebulae, but personally (if I'd only be getting one filter) than I'd be getting the UHC filter. I own the 2" Astronomic and a 1.25" Lumicon UHC as well as both the 1.25" & 2" Celestron OIII filters and the UHC filters are used much more than the OIII, simply because I get much nicer views of nebulae through it than when comparing the view through the OIII filter.
  2. Yup.. amazing how much difference a dark sky makes to imaging and observing DSO.
  3. Very nice, the collection is almost complete.
  4. That would be the Celestron C8 OTA... essentially it's the same scope except that it's black as opposed to orange.... I didn't find the 8SE mount that wobbly, it's quite good for a single arm mount and a 8" SCT... I used worse... but it's noticeably not as stable as my CGEM...
  5. The 8SE comes with a Alt-Az GOTO mount.... and a decent quality eyepiece...
  6. Of course... I know that its more expensive but I find that it's worth it and it is a one of expense for... well possibly ever.... perhaps a 2nd hand one would be much cheaper.
  7. From my experience, I had a 60mm Tasco as a kid/teenager before getting a "serious" telescope in my adulthood... I had the same type of scope now for 11 years and have never regretted getting it... the scope I recommend for observing is the celestron 8SE, perfect scope for observing. This scope has a big 8" mirror and has given me some great views of DSO, the moon and planets and it all comes in a very compact package. The GOTO is very accurate and as a bonus it is easily later upgradable for some imaging with the change of the mount as I have done.
  8. Superb image, love the detail.... well done.
  9. Way to go NASA... you've joined the separate and create more hate in the world mob...
  10. They will look sharp because your eye is not picking up the drift like your camera... if you cant see polaris that you need to drift align after the rough polar alignment, to have a chance of getting your scope ready for longer sub exposures.
  11. In that case your trailing problem is definitely due to poor polar alignment... you need to have a very accurate polar alignment to get drift free long exposures, (not to mention guiding, especially at high focal lengths and depending on exactly how long you want to expose your subs)... just using a compass will not even be close to what you need, and with your stars trailing at 4 seconds, tell me that your polar alignment is way off... this is what you need to get right first to progress in your astro imaging.
  12. What about your polar alignment accuracy?
  13. You need to give us more information about your setup.. how are you guiding?? ... although first thing I would do in your situation is check and triple check your polar alignment... and get it as close to perfect as possible..
  14. From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    These nebulae are located in the constellation Corona Australis, between γ and ε Coronae Australis and features NGC6726, NGC6729 and NGC6723. This is not a popular group of objects or part of the sky, but I thought that the combination of reflection nebula crossed by a dark nebulae make an interesting image. This image was exposed through my Celestron 8" SCT (at F10), on the CGEM mount with my full spectrum modded and cooled Canon 40D DSLR for a total exposure time of 5 hours, 59 minutes and 30 seconds.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  15. MarsG76

    Deep Sky Imaging

    Collection of my Deep Space objects. These images have been take through a 8" SCT or 80mm refractor using a full spectrum modded Canon 40D (as stated in the description of each photo).
  16. Hello Astronomers, Sharing with you the last DSO which I exposed before planning to move onto some planetary imaging as Mars approaches opposition. These nebulae are located in the constellation Corona Australis, between γ and ε Coronae Australis and features NGC6726, NGC6729 and NGC6723, not a popular group of objects or area of the sky, but I thought that the combination of reflection nebula crossed by a dark nebulae make an interesting image. This image was exposed through my Celestron 8" SCT (at F10), on the CGEM with my full spectrum modded and cooled Canon 40D DSLR for a total exposure time of 5 hours, 59 minutes and 30 seconds. CS, MG
  17. What a great looking image.... now I'm wondering if I could see if from Sydney?
  18. Great capture.. technically these are unprocessed which is even more of a testament of the great quality of the data.
  19. Love it, a emerald jewel in the sky....
  20. Very OK for a first imaging attempt...
  21. Nice Andromeda... wish I could see it from down here.....
  22. I don't think that I have any problems with focus, but more of a atmospheric seeing issue... I use a bathinov mask to focus with every filter.
  23. As we all image and process, we improve with time. The hazy effect looks atmospheric and I like it, but it down to everyones personal taste. I remember when I imaged the Orion nebula during less than ideal seeing conditions and I ended up with a similar effect, which I liked, but the reactions from other was mixed, some liked it and some didn't... in the eye of the beholder I guess... than again if every photo looked the same, than it would be quite boring very fast.
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