Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I have a question about filterwheels; SBIG filter wheels specifically. As far as I know they are the only ones that really use the 8 position filter wheels. So I have it loaded with L, R, G, B, Ha, OIII, and SII. So that is seven filters, what goes in the 8th slot???

Thank you for your insight,
Christopher

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a C filter, which is like the L but with (without?) the IR block (can't remember which way round they are).

Some people also have a special IR-pass filters for imaging the moon and planets. And some use a set of UBVIR filters for photometry.

There are also other less usual filters. I have a CH4 filter for (particularly) Jupiter & Saturn. I also have an NE3 filter for (particularly) planetary nebulae.

So that's another nine options ...  where can I get a 16-position filter wheel :biggrin:?

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've never felt the need for it forget it!

:Dlly

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could use an 8 position wheel for my Trius camera, for LRGB, [SII]. [NII], HII, [OIII]. Baader LRGB, plus a full set of 3nm Astrodons. As it is, I either have to lose the L filter, or else one of the NB, usually the [SI].

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just curious, having just started imaging with a DSLR, and having a long way to go before I'm ready for mono cameras and filters.

Would you need all 8 filters in one session, or do you just keep all your filters loaded and control which ones to use in a given session ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, the most you'd need is R, G, B if you were going to cycle through them during the course of a session, any L data would be added separately The reason for loading up the wheel is to have all your filters in one place, and hopefully not gathering dust, something they can do with alarming ease.

A narrow band session would likely use only one filter at a time, to gather as much signal as possible.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep them loaded and use what you need.  Although it is not uncommon to use LRGB in rotation (LLLRGB LLLRGB,  etc).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A dark filter would be handy if you are using the gear remotely and need a new set of darks.. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to mention (though it only applies to thinned CCD chips), I always use an  IR blocking filter to get rid of those pesky diffraction patterns on my images caused by atmospheric moisture.

Diff.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/06/2019 at 02:51, stardude07 said:

Hello,

I have a question about filterwheels; SBIG filter wheels specifically. As far as I know they are the only ones that really use the 8 position filter wheels. So I have it loaded with L, R, G, B, Ha, OIII, and SII. So that is seven filters, what goes in the 8th slot???

Thank you for your insight,
Christopher

There is such a thing as aNitrogen 2 (NII) filter if you have a 3nm Ha filter then you can split it out. Some people will use a LP filter as Luminance in a mono camera.

Edited by Adam J

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/06/2019 at 19:46, jjosefsen said:

A dark filter would be handy if you are using the gear remotely and need a new set of darks.. :)

That kinda implies that your leaving the scope permanently without a cap on it. Would not want to do that to a scope of mine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By WiltsStarGazer
      Having previously got some reasonable images by mounting a smart phone to the eyepiece. I thought I would try for a more sophisticated set up.
      So last night I tried to get some pictures of the moon using a Canon Eos D450 connected to a Skywatcher 130p Newtonian via a T2 connection on the eyepiece holder.
      As the camera has automatic focusing built into the lens I thought I would have to adjust the focuser on the eyepiece holder to manually get a sharp image.
      Basically the telescope acting as a manually focused lens for the camera.
      But no joy, I just got a bright light which seemed to fill the camera view finder. I tried various settings on the camera, adjusting ISO and aperture etc,  I also had some extention rings for the camera lens so tired fitting those to extend the focal length but no better.
      I sure there are many palms being slapped against foreheads reading this but as you can tell I have no idea, although I do have some of the gear.
      Any pointers and/or advise would be gratefully received.
    • By gilesco
      Just sending a query out there to anyone who has experience imaging at public sites on Dartmoor?
      Looking to learn about good locations, how this is received by the National Park authority (if imaging through the night) etc...
    • By cwine
      Hi! I've been struggling to get rid of slightly spiked/elongated stars that appear on the left hand side of my images. The stars have small spikes coming out the bottom left hand side of them.
      I use an unmodded Canon 600D with a 70-200mm Canon f4 lens (which I have recently cleaned to try and solve this issue). I use the star adventurer to track, but this doesn't look like the type of trail you get with bad alignment.
      I've attached some images as an example of what I mean - Example 1 is the bottom left of an image of the North American Nebula, and example 2 is the top right of the same image. Any ideas?



    • By MarsG76
      These nebulae are located in the constellation Corona Australis, between γ and ε Coronae Australis and features NGC6726, NGC6729 and NGC6723.
      This is not a popular group of objects or part of the sky, but I thought that the combination of reflection nebula crossed by a dark nebulae make an interesting image.
      This image was exposed through my Celestron 8" SCT (at F10), on the CGEM mount with my full spectrum modded and cooled Canon 40D DSLR for a total exposure time of 5 hours, 59 minutes and 30 seconds.
       
    • By yltansg
      Hi,
      I would like to share with you an article written by me on high-resolution solar imaging in different wavelengths.  Glad that the European Physics Journal (EPJ) Web of Conferences published it. You can read it at:   

      https://www.epj-conferences.org/articles/epjconf/abs/2020/16/epjconf_seaan2020_01002/epjconf_seaan2020_01002.html
      You can see the different layers of the Sun in high-resolution images using different setups.  
       
      Best regards.
      Alfred 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.