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Found 182 results

  1. I've been processing this image for quite a long now. I started acquiring data the last season when I only managed to shoot 3 panels with the Canon 6D through the Esprit 80 for a total of ~7h. This season I restarted and I added more data and covered a wider area. So a mix of portrait and landscape panels were planned and shot with the same scope and camera. Now every pixel represents at least 3-4h of integration, some have more. All the above were shot from Bortle 2-3 sites where I traveled sometimes even for an hour of exposure. To the RGB data I added 17.5h of Ha, same story with the panels. Some were oriented N-S, others E-W. These were shot with the SW 72ED and the ASI1600 from home and Bortle ~7. Then I figured out I still had time and I planned and shot 9 more panels of luminance with the 72ED and ASI1600, each consisting of 1h of exposure. I combined all of these into an image, processed it and for the Orion nebula and Running Man nebula I also blended some data I shot last season with the 130PDS and ASI1600 from home. Below it's my first final version of all data combined. You can watch it in full resolution on astrobin: https://www.astrobin.com/full/jni0w8/ or Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/2iBGUXq
  2. From the album: Nebula

    First image from my new NEQ6 Pro driven mount, all other images before this were static. Sky Watcher 200P prime focus, 10x 60's lights, darks, bias and flats. ISO 200 Bortle 6 Yes I know there is a plane track through it.
  3. From the album: Stars and Constellations

    Taken using Canon 100D on Skywatcher Star Adventurer - 55mm lens - single 4 minute exposure at ISO 800 You can clearly see M42 The Orion Nebula within "the sword", and there is a hint of The Flame Nebula and The Horsehead Nebula around the bottom left star of "the belt" Taken during a trip out to The Dales on Thursday night at a nice dark site between Kettlewell and Hawes

    © Vicky050373

  4. From the album: Wide-field (not barn-door)

    Alternately developped version where some gamma stretching was used rather than brightness stretching. Hence most saturated values are pale or grey/white. Shows a bit more contrast though.

    © Fabien COUTANT

  5. From the album: Alt-Az / NoEQ DSO challenge

    M42: Great Orion nebula / M43: De Mairan nebula Infos: Capture = 103 lights x 8s x 1600iso, 21 darks, Olympus E-PM1 with Skywatcher 130PDS and CC on Celestron SLT mount, TS contrast filter; Processing = Regim, Fotoxx, Gimp Under huge light pollution level (SKM<17) Date: 2016-11-11 Place: 10km from Paris, suburbs

    © Fabien COUTANT

  6. From the album: 2015.

    Taken with ed80+ sony alpha, 5x10 sec shots staxed

    © free

  7. From the album: Deep Sky

    M42 - The Orion Nebula, plus top left M43 - De Marian's Nebula (aka "The Running Man Nebula"). This is 30 x 30 second exposures, plus 22 x 320 second exposures in an HDR composite, taken 11th Jan 2014. Again I was battling a nearly full Moon as we seem to get nothing but rain around here when the skies are fully dark! This image was processed entirely in PixInsight. I hope to get some longer exposures to try to capture more of the surrounding dust. Imaging: Sky-Watcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro + 0.85x, Canon EOS 500D (Unmodified), Hutech IDAS LPS P2, APT - Astro Photography Tool Mount: Sky-Watcher NEQ6, AstroTortilla, EQMod Guiding: Orion ST80, QHY 5, PHD guiding Processing: PixInsight Date: Jan. 11, 2014 Lights: 30 x 30", 22 x 320" ISO 400 Darks: 109 Flats: 102 Bias: 330

    © Copyright Ian Lauwerys, All Rights Reserved.

  8. From the album: First Attempts at Everything

    My first M42. I think I used a 135/200mm lens on a NEX 5N. Not sure.

    © NYPalomo

  9. mitchelln

    M42 130301 4

    From the album: Galaxies

    M42, aligned, HDR

    © Neill Mitchell

  10. Like the lunatic that I am, I decided to get the scope out last week during that storm that was passing through. The skies were clear and there was no moon about, so I figured why not! Only problem was the 17-20 mph winds, lol. I got 2 hrs of subs but had to throw away half of them due to guiding problems more so than the wind, amazingly. This was the 2nd time in a row i'd had Dec guiding problems, and that's after about 2 years of not having a single problem guiding. After the 1st hr of wasted subs, I turned off Fast Switching in Dec and chose to only Dither in RA, and the Dec problems mostly went away, at least to allow me to capture 1 hr of 'still dodgy but just about useable' subs. Once M42 disappeared behind the neighbour's roof, I then re-calibrated on the Celestial Equator (Dec 0) and when I switched to the Pinwheel Galaxy I was able to guide as normal again (with Fast Switching and Dithering in both RA and Dec both turned on again) and didn't lose any subs, despite the wind, so I've decided that from now on I won't be calibrating at the target itself, i'm always going to do it at Dec 0. I decided to throw this in with another 1 hr of subs (plus 10 x 30s for the core) that I took back in Jan 2017 (has it really been that long?!). That hr also had issues, with some weird streaking in the lower left that I could never work out what caused it. The D5300 hadn't been modified at that stage either. So I fired it all in to APP and decided to stack it anyway, and give it a quick process. Then chose to crank it up to 11 on the colour front, just for laughs. It won't be going on the wall anytime soon, lol, but I suppose it came out a bit better than I was expecting, all things considered. 20 x 360s with an IDAS-D1 D5300, 80ED, HEQ5-Pro. Stacked in APP, processed in PS. CS! edit - I forgot to downscale it - so no pixel peeping allowed ?
  11. So I know Orion has been down now for a while, but I just wanted to share this one. For me, it was a literal labour of love. Orion took on a more personal meaning for me at the tale end of last year, much more than just a target in the night sky. I won't bore you all with details, other than it was all very Romeo and Juliet. Anyway, the one night we went for a drive the other side of Hereford (this was mid February), took a firepit, hot chocolate, jacket potatoes and some very warm coats! It was a blustery night, the intervalometer was acting up and Orion was still in Hereford's light dome kinda. But, still managed to get some images with the 18-55 kit lens on the trusty Nikon 5300 despite all of that. Had all but given up on the stacking and processing 2 months later but decided to run it thru Sequator as DSS wasn't working for me. Was 2am, I was dead tired from work and my good old thyroid in full on flare. Happened to yawn, rub my eyes and momentarily refocus them on the laptop screen...to realise I could just very faintly make out Barnard's Loop. Spent the next couple of days rerunning the stack thru Sequator with different parameters to finally produce the attached image. It's messy, it's noisy as hell, it's nowhere near technically correct, but for ME it's a very bittersweet image (two days later Romeo and Juliet parted ways) and a reminder of what happy is. Anyway, I just wanted to share it.
  12. Hi, Some old data from last November; before my camera was modded. The original image was processed with DSS and GIMP, the new version with DSS and StarTools. I'm still quite noobish when processing with StarTools. but its a really fun program to learn. On this image I forgot to desaturate the sky background to remove the LP colour glow--when I do a reprocess I will do that. I'm hoping that there will be some clear skies around November-December this year to get some better quality data. The streaky noise is caused by the rather noisy CMOS and no dithering--I didn't start using APT until the New Year. The gradient is caused by the secondary being not quite centred under the camera up/down the tube. Around 1 hour of 2-3 min subs, ISO 800 EQ5 and 130P-DS, guided with PHD2 & 50mm finder/guider EOS 1000d and MPCC Mk 4 + Cheap LP filter Old: (GIMP) New: (StarTools--Still a lot of work needed) John
  13. I had a few hours free last night, which remarkably coincided with clear skies, so I had a nice little session from around 8 until 10.30 ish. The moon was an obvious target, and I spent a decent amount of time panning along the terminator enjoying the views. I was rather obsessed with trying to spot craterlets on Plato, although I'm not sure whether last night was the best phase or not. I managed a grand total of two with a suspected third, not amazing! The seeing varied from fairly decent to fairly wobbly depending upon whether it was over the neighbours garden or house! Next up M42 obviously. Even without a filter the nebulosity showed well, clear tints of green to my eye. Switching from 24mm Pan to Nag Zoom showed the Trap at between x123 and x246. Whilst the E star was fairly clear at times, F was nothing more than a 'might be' every now and then. I know the scope is capable of it, the seeing just isn't a lot of the time. I tried the binoviewers out too, to see whether they made any improvement on the Trap and Moon. The Trap was a no, I think E was slightly harder with the binos, and the Moon was an unfair comparison because it had gone over the neighbours house. Will repeat the exercise under better conditions. I then made a start at a few Carbon stars, having added a number of lists to SkySafari. I find these lists very handy as the basis for an observing session and highly recommend having a look at them if you haven't already. Sorted by transit time I picked off a few without too much slewing. Hind's Crimson star kind of stole the show, such a lovely deep red colour. In comparison the others I viewed on the list seemed far more orange but I'll persevere and see how I get on. WZ Cassiopeiae appeared on both the Carbon stars and the coloured doubles list, a quite wide pair at 57.7", one orange and the other white. Similar brightness at mag 7.1 and 8.3 BL Orionis and V613 Monocerotis were the other two I got, fairly unremarkable I found but still rewarding identifying them in the star fields. Sigma Cass and Iota Cass were the last two doubles that I picked. Sigma was, I think, a new one for me. Nice tight (3.1") uneven double, mags 4.88 and 7.24. To my eye they looked similar in colour, white. Iota is a lovely one as we all know. Not something I view very often, must try harder, but at x123 with the Nag Zoom the three components were beautifully resolved. I'm sure I could have used lower mag but didn't bother changing eye pieces. Higher mag increased the split obviously, but somehow I preferred the tight star shapes and split at the 6mm setting. So, nice little session with the Tak/AZGTi setup which is my usual these days. Lightweight so easy to setup and alignment quick and easy. Grubby little iPhone shot attached, plus some detail of the SS lists I have loaded.
  14. Hello all, I'm starting a new thread for this since the hydrogen data is rather old and it has been reprocessed since I posted a while ago. Now I finished the acquisition of O[III] too. Or sort of, I planned more, but clear nights were so rare that I decided to process what I had. The image was done in "3 pass" data over the area. That means that I acquired 3 sets of images covering the same area and combined in the end. First 2 in hydrogen, the last in oxygen. First set consisted of 3 panels in portrait mode for the top area and then I wanted to extend them to the bottom so I shot another 2 panels in landscape mode. I knew that I could get a higher SNR so I shot 4 more panels in landscape mode. Each panel consists of 30-31 subs, each sub 300s. Then I started the acquisition of O[III] which needed light pollution and moonlight conditions than the Ha required. Top panels contain 30 subs, but the bottom ones, only 20-22. Each 300s. Luckily there's not much oxygen in that area so I could get away with less subs. I also took some 10s-30s frames for M42's core. For the framing, I created a quick mosaic of the same area. For the final alignment I shot an image somewhere close to the center of this area. I can't remember if the initial register was done in APP or Registar - for the first pass, but for the next ones it was done in Registar. I removed the gradient manually in each stack with APP and then I created the mosaics for each pass same with APP. The 2 Ha passes I then blended manually 50%-50%. For the processing, I tried to stretch both Ha and O[III] to the same levels and I combined them manually in some 60-40/70-30 ratio for a layer which I used as lum. The colours were Ha - reddish, O[III] - cyan-blue. I spent a lot of time trying to control the big stars, the O[III] filter has poor coatings and, together with the ASI1600s non AR coated sensor, I had much brighter reflections than with the Ha filter. And I tried to raise the oxygen levels selectively around the flame and NGC2023, but the flame is really dim in O[III]. Don't know what other details in the story I forgot, this project drained me a lot of energy. Camera was ASI1600MMC, cooled to -15C for the first pass and to -25C for the ones following. Gain 139. Canon 300 F4 L IS lens with a lot of aberrations towards the edges. AZ-EQ5 mount guided with a 200mm lens and an ASI120MM, with varying seeing. 1.5-2.5" RMS guiding error usually. APT for capture, PHD2 for guiding, Registar for each night initial alignment. DSS, APP, Registar, StarTools, GIMP for processing. I started shooting early in October and I wanted much more, but Orion already becomes less and less visible from where I image and hides beyond the house. Ah, yes, I image from a yellow-pink light polluted area. Thanks for reading, thanks for looking! Comments and suggestions are appreciated. Links to original image and acquisition details: https://drive.google.com/open?id=17tr8lqagQAJg8maojtHZPbM-f67gSBTv https://drive.google.com/open?id=12gjGEgeR7FxR1Tow0e64JczeeUIqKojK https://www.astrobin.com/330284/ Alex
  15. First, I'd like to say that I'm in wet diapers as far as imaging goes, just making a few baby steps. Tonight was clear and not as freezing cold as has been recently, so I took the kit into the barnyard where I have a fairly decent sky. I just added Bob's Knobs to my Edge HD 8", and had done an indoor collimation; I wanted to fine tune it outside as one goal of observing tonight. Another goal was trying out my new WO GT81 on the Moon, I haven't had the opportunity to use it for lunar because of recent weather.....and no Moon. So, one of the last things tonight was to swing over to M42 after the Moon got too low to observe. I used the frac to observe wide-field for a while, then put the Edge on the mount; to check collimation I swung over to Castor, and clearly split it with a 25mm Plossl. Then I went to Capella, defocused so I could get the 'donut', and it was so perfect as I closed it down while focusing I left the collimation as it was. Skewing over to M42, I started with a 25mm Plossl in a 2" diagonal and worked my way up, ending with my 2" 2.5x Luminos barlow and a 13mm Ultima EP, giving me 385X. Visually, I could split 'E' and 'F' in the Trapezium, so I thought I'd see if I could get an image through the EP with my DSLR, since the Ultima is threaded for a T-ring. This is a single image, 2.5 seconds at ISO 6400. Less exposure did not bring out 'E' any better, and 'F' is showing as a bulge in its companion. More exposure hid both as the Trapezium stars were too bright.
  16. Here's my first attempt at bi-colour HOO narrowband, using the OIII filter I got for Christmas Please do click through to Flickr and have a look at it with the magnifying glass, there's loads of detail in there. 23x600s Ha, 20x60s Ha, 10x600s OIII, 8x60s OIII, darks, flats and bias, equipment as per sig, Pixinsight. It was an absolute joy to process this, it was singing to me from the very first trial combination of stacks. I had lots of fun playing with colour balances (actually it's more like HOo, and then I let the red grow a bit, looks like a watermelon to me). Had fun with the HDR too. I've done some HaLRGB before, and I have the skies for it, but I'm finding HaLRGB to be quite frustrating - takes ages to process to get the balance right, and even then it seems to be a compromise between the detail of the Ha and the colours of the RGB, and all too often, it comes out like a big red smudge. I've got a Pacman in processing that might just end up left on the cutting room floor. It seems I've finally tamed my collimation and coma demons, but on this occasion, my guiding was surprisingly shocking. I normally get something like 0.45" rms error, but this time was as much as 2.5". We'd had near-gales the few days before I took this, and while it was calm at ground level on the nights I was capturing, I guess it was still hurtling around in the upper atmosphere - pretty twinkling stars, and a rather less pretty guide star bouncing around all over the place in PHD. I had to throw away nearly half of my OIII because the stars were too fat, as you can tell from the capture details above. Just for a laugh, here is my first attempt, taken 6 years ago with an unmodded DSLR - a shamefully small set of data (ahem, 13x10s !) and processed within an inch of its life (I think this was about the 4th reprocess), but not a bad attempt I suppose. Anyway, hope you enjoy, comments and cc welcome ! Cheers, Stuart
  17. I had another good night recovering my imaging skills on 28th with M42 as the subject. Equinox 80, Canon 1000D, 20 frames each from 2sec to 300sec at ISO 800. I used the HDR tool in PixInsight using this tutorial. I like it. I am not sure I believe all that brown stuff near the Running Man, but this is definitely the best image I have created of M42. Not what it looks like through the eyepiece, but revealing a lot more detail than previous attempts. What does everyone else think? Good, bad, meh? I have kept the processing to the minimum steps so it is possible I might be able to do more with this, but happy the way it is. Happy New Year all!
  18. As it has been a number of years since i have managed to get out under the stars (having had two small children in between) i thought i would use an old friend to get back into deep sky. M42, about 12x6 mins lights, darks to match. Dss and PS to tweek. It was such a nice feeling to get out there, a dream session where it all worked as it was supposed to and not a cloud to be seen. Had a look at Venus as well but my views of Mars and Neptune from here were pretty poor. nice to be back!
  19. reprocessed. i split the channels and ajusted on the own, as advise by MG. i think its looking better its got more detail now. feel free to have a play. taken with ed80, sony alpha. 20x 25 second shots iso 800. thanks for looking clear skys charl.
  20. 9th/10th November 2015 Equipment: 80x500mm refractor Time: 22:46 - 00:40 47 Tucanae: showed a fuzzy patch with a distinctly denser/brighter core through a 40mm eyepiece (13X magnified). The 11mm (45X) eyepiece started to show granulation through out the globular cluster. The view was quite faint but noticeable and distinct. The very obviously brighter core gradually became fainter and more disperse toward the edges of the globular disc. The edges were noticibly irregular. NGC265 in Hydrus, dense star field just above beta Hydrus near east of 47 Tucanae. Heaps of faint stars but no nebulosity. The orange star that reminded me of the Sagittarius supernova during last binocular observation is in constellation Reticulum, quite possibly alpha reticulum, right place and brightness, note that gamma reticulum seems orange on star maps. Cluster in Sirius that I spotted last time I was observing is M41. A open cluster of stars, quite sparse and spread out cluster. Easily visible in binoculars and the 80mm refractor. The Pleiades are looking awesome as usual, about a hundred stars visible, and the whole constellation visible in the 40mm eyepiece FOV. This is one object that I usually spend a fair bit of time observing. This view is one that needs the least possible magnification with the highest possible light gathering power, so the 80mm scope at 13X through the 40mm eyepiece is ideal... Atleast in my tool box. Orion Nebula shows the whole Orion's sword in the 40mm eyepiece at 13X. This is definitely a view worth spending a bit of time observing. The running man nebula is very faintly showing through, but not anywhere near as obvious as the Orion Nebula. Increasing the power to 45X with the 11mm TV Nagler reveals more nebulosity and the trapezium is very obvious. Filters: Celestron OIII and Lumicon UHC filters seem to cut away too much light in the 80mm scope. There is more contrast through both but I preferred the view without either filter. The Celestron UHC/LPR and Seben CLR filters did a better job in showing more nebulosity as well as increasing the contrast. Both had their advantages so it's hard to say which did a better job, but if I had to choose, I'd say the UHC/LPR had slightly the edge on the darker parts of the nebula. The OIII and UHC filters are both too aggressive for the 80mm. Equipment: NexStar 8SE Time: 02:00 - 03:40 From approximately 2am, when the 80mm frac was setup to image the Orion's Sword, I wanted to compare the view in the 8SE to the 80mm refractor. First I framed up on to the Orion Nebula, without the UHC filter the nebula glow was very obvious and the stars with in and around, such as the trapezium, were bright. Looking through the 40mm and 11mm eyepieces with and without the UHC filter, the nebulosity was quite obvious, the "moustache" and the fishes mouth were obvious with detail visible that was not visible in the refractor as expected. That said I do remember a more detailed view of the Orion Nebula in the past... Especially using the UHC filter. The second object I located was the globular 47Tucanae. In the 40mm eyepiece the globular did not look any better than in the refractor so I replaced the eye piece to the 11mm Nagler. In the Nagler the globular was still quite dim but I did start to see granulation within the globular, but I was expecting to see the globular as a brighter object than what I'm seeing. I put the reason to seeing such dim views in the globular and the Orion Nebula to the fact that I had to keep adjusting the autoguide star on the laptop screen, even though the screen was turned down to minimum, I figured that the white light was still bright enough to ruin my night adaption.... Then I thought, have a look at the corrector plate... Sure enough, nearly totally covered in dew. Oh well the observing part of the night is over, next time I'll have to run a RCA cable from the CGEM dew strap controller to the 8SE on alt-az mount and try these objects again. Hopefully in the next week there will be at least one more clear night before the moon lights things up again. MG
  21. M42 orion neb. woke at 4.45am got a qwick snap before the sun rose, 5x10sec staxed, didnt have time to sort tracking because it was slipping out of view of my obsy window so could only get 10 sec subs and out of 24 5 where only useable. taken with ed80 and sony alpha iso 800, staxed with Regi. thanks for looking clear skys charl.
  22. ...It's enought to celebrate, heck it's enough to get drunk I say...! Yesterday it's was clear and so I had to make the yearly M42 image, it's already late for it as it's getting behind the roofs for me but even so i managed to get 7x10 min. subs and another 10x30 secs for the core, cooked it all an there you go, a clean and detailled Orion nebula The image is resized to 50% resolution but still there's plenty of details to take in, check out the trapezium fully resolved, in the full resolution image there's even E and a hint of the F component there at only 800 mm f/l...cool https://www.flickr.c...eposted-public/ Hope you enjoy, Cheers, P.S: Thanks to Jerry Lodriguss for the tutorial in PS, I allways get at it when processing images of M42...as I forget how to do it every time
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