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Found 227 results

  1. This may be an artifact, but I took this shot of the Orion Constellation from the Canary Islands and it showed a small nebula around Beteleguse. Do you think this is real? The shot was taken with a dual band filter which brings out the Ha. I initially assumed it was a camera artifact, but I took more shots with different camera positions and it was still there. There are some on-line articles about such a nebula. My first reaction was to edit it out, but I think it might be real and only visible because Beteleguse has dimmed by over 50%. What do you think? Max
  2. The Rosette Nebula taken in Cathedral City, CA I've wanted to image the Rosette nebula for some time now, but with my Celestron 6se telescope it was not really feasible due to the large focal length of the scope. The Rosette nebula is huge! I decided to give it a try with my new Orion ST80, and I could not be happier with how it turned out. It is certainly not a Hubble image, but I did the best I could under light polluted skies, and man does it look beautiful. 5 hours total exposure time Canon 450d Orion ST80 Orion Skyglow filter Celestron AVX mount Stacked in DSS Edited it CS6 and LR http://coachella-astronomy-astrophotography.blogspot.com/2017/02/the-rosette-nebula.html
  3. These are my last images of 2019 taken with my ED72 and 183mm pro to be replaced by a 533pro These targets are not easy due to location trees etc except M1 , there was a bright moon as well so are all lucky shots but at last i have taken them warts and all . My guiding was all off as well Anyway a merry Christmas to you all and a Happy new year
  4. During recent night I've managed to take only 50 minutes of OIII in narrowband so I could add to previously gathered Hydrogen. This is more like experiment as it is my first bicolor image. Scope: Skywatcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro with flattener Mount: NEQ6-Pro Camera: QHY168C Filter Baader 7nm H-alpha , Baader O-III CCD Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: finderscope 16x300s exposure at -10°C (80 min total) in H-Alpha 10x300s exposure at -10°C (50 min total) in OIII
  5. IC4604 in LRGB Filters. Taking for Namibia during my visit in June 2019. This beautiful nebula is part of the rho Ophiuchi colorful cloud, i the center a 3 blue bright stars the reflect the blue light on the nebula. Photo Details: Lum - 20 x 5min = 100min RGB - 5x5min for each channel at BIN2, 75min Total Exposure: 175Min (~3 Hours) Telescope: ASA 12'' F3.6 Mount: DDM 85 Unguided Camera: FLI 16200 Mono Filters: Astrodon Thanks for watching, Haim My Flicker Page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/101543943@N04/
  6. mikemabel

    M76

    My first image of M76 A bit rushed as clear nights are a rarity now 30x120s Bin 2 Luminance ,SW 102 , ZWO 183MM Pro , OVL field flattener ,guided , processed in Gimp Took some Ha as well but poor results for some reason Seems an Oiii filter may have brought out some more detail i know its not great but just chuffed to have imaged it
  7. This has been a bit of a project. Last year I worked out that my 200mm Canon F2.8 lens and ASI1600 would frame the whole of the Veil complex quite nicely. I captured Ha and OIII data for the east and west nebulae with a Tak FSQ 106 and added this into the widefield image. Although the Tak data had to be shrunk down it did add a bit of extra resolution where it was needed. The difficulty for me has been the processing. I have found it really difficult to tease out the faint wisps of detail and have tried the usual routines of micro contrast adjustments using curves along with Scott Rosen's Screen blend/mask inversion method but the results weren't great owing to the close proximity of faint and bright nebulosity. I'd heard about the PI process tool for removing stars, Starnet, so loaded this and had a rare foray into PI. This proved very helpful. It was a luminence created from Ha and OIII using the 200mm lens with the Tak data mixed in. Then the starless layer was added in PS with the screen blend mode at 50% opacity. The nebulosity detail was so well preserved I didn't need a mask. After blending I reduced the stars a bit more using the starless layer again and darken as the blend at 50%. I should really unleash some of the stars to add a bit of "punch" but I've wrestled with this data enough for now! I plan to use it further as I look deeper into the Gorgon that is PixInsight! Telescope: Tak 106 for E and W veils. Canon 200mmL lens Camera: ZWO ASI 1600 pro mono cmos, Gain 150, offset 50 Filters: Baader 7nm OIII and Ha E+W Veil 10x30 mins each channel for each nebula. Whole complex 50x5mins for each channel Captured with SGP, calibrated, aligned and combined with PI, processed mainly with PS but PI for Starnet. Ha mapped to red and OIII to both blue and green
  8. MarsG76

    M17 - SHO

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband and combined in Hubble palette style. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 8 August 2019.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  9. MarsG76

    M17 Pseudo RGB

    From the album: Deep Sky Imaging

    The Omega Nebula, aka The swan Nebula, M17/NGC6618 imaged in Narrowband hAo3hB as RGB. The photo was imaged with a astromodded and cooled DSLR through a 8" SCT across multiple networks gets from 28 July - 4 August 2019.

    © Mariusz Goralski

  10. GWalles

    Sadr Region (revised)

    From the album: First Images

    This is currently a work in progress. Playing around with Photoshop CC to try and extract more detail from this image. This image is not as cropped as the others I have posted.

    © Garrick Walles

  11. From the album: First Images

    © Garrick Walles

  12. From the album: First Images

    Deneb and Sadr (Cygnus) | 50 30 second subs Dithering | 0 Darks | 0 Bias | 0 Flats Canon 650D Samyang 100mm 2.8 ED Skywatcher Adventurer Mini
  13. From the album: Mike's Images

    Cat's Paw Nebula - NGC 6334 ( aka Bear Claw Nebula ) An emission nebula in Scorpius (near the scorpion's tail) RA 17h 25m 39.6s ; Dec -35deg 43' 48" . 7th August 2015. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. ISO800, 14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on. 28 x 200sec (starting at zenith) no moon, 3deg C, 70%RH, moderate LP. PixInsight

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2015 - all rights reserved

  14. From the album: Mike's Images

    Cat's Paw Nebula - NGC 6334 ( aka Bear Claw Nebula ) An emission nebula in Scorpius (near the scorpion's tail) RA 17h 25m 39.6s ; Dec -35deg 43' 48" . 7th August 2015. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. ISO800, 14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on. 28 x 200sec (starting at zenith) no moon, 3deg C, 70%RH, moderate LP. PixInsight

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2015 - all rights reserved

  15. Maxrayne

    NGC 7000 220mm-1.jpg

    From the album: Nebulae

    © Graeme Healey Photography

  16. Observations of the Sculptor Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) by William and John Herschel ......... Part 2. Observations of "Caroline's Galaxy" by Sir John Herschel, 1830's Sir John Herschel, the only child of Mary Baldwin and Sir William Herschel, was born in 1792 when his father was in middle age and already famous as one of world's leading astronomers. Having excelled in school, and no doubt inspired by his famous elders, John Herschel decided upon a career as a 'man of science' and set out to pursue a wide range of interests; with one particular focus being a continuation of the study of the heavens commenced by his father and aunt, Caroline Herschel. In 1820, with the assistance of his father, John Herschel supervised the construction of a new telescope at Slough in England. As described in the extract below ( from a paper presented to the Royal Society in 1826, titled "Account of some observations made with a 20-feet reflecting telescope ... " ), the telescope had a polished metal mirror with clear aperture of 18 inches, focal length of 20 feet and was modelled on the same design created by his father. It is this telescope, in the 1820’s and early 30’s, following the death of his father and the return of his aunt Caroline to Hanover, that John Herschel used to 'sweep' the night sky and extend the catalogue of nebulae and clusters of stars that was published by his father ( see W. Herschel's Catalogue of One Thousand new Nebulae and Clusters of Stars ). On the 1st of July 1833, having complied sufficient observations, John Herschel presented to the Royal Society an updated list of the positions and descriptions of the Nebulae and Clusters of Stars that he had thus far observed. As noted in the introduction to the paper published in the Philosophical Transactions, he had planned to wait before publishing until he had complied a fully comprehensive general catalogue of objects visible from the south of England. However, due to his expectation of “several more more years additional work” needed to complete the task and his assessment that he now was in a position to address, at least in part, the then current “... want of an extensive list of nebulae arranged in order of right ascension ...”, he elected to present his list, “ ... simply stating the individual results of such observations as I have hitherto made ... “. It was not until October 16, 1863, some thirty years later, that Sir John would deliver to the Royal Society his General Catalogue of Nebulae and Clusters of Stars. As well as introducing many objects that had not previously been recorded, Sir John’s list of 1833 included a re-examination of, and in some cases a small correction to, the positions of many of the deep sky objects observed by his father and noted down by his aunt. One of these re-visited objects was, unsurprisingly, the large and bright nebula discovered by Caroline Herschel in 1783 and recorded in Sir Williams’s catalogue as V.1 / CH 10 ( object number one, of class five ( very large nebulae ) / Caroline Herschel #10 ). In total, John Herschel records around 2500 observations of nebulae and clusters of stars in his 1833 paper; with observation #61 being V.1, the “ Sculptor Galaxy “ . The measured position of V.1is given in RA and the angle from the north celestial pole ( all reduced to epoch 1830.0 ). The description can be interpreted by reference to the legend in the paper. Thus, “ A vL mE vB neb “ becomes “ A very large, much extended, elliptic or elongated, very bright nebula “. He also notes that in addition to this observation, #61, noted down from sweep #306, V.1 was also observed in sweep #292, “but no place was taken”. The figure to which he refers , figure 52, is included towards the back of his paper and is a sketch he made of the Sculptor Galaxy. to be continued ...
  17. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    3 hours total integration on NGC6995, The Eastern Nebula. 20x180sec Ha and 40x180sec OIII. 25 flats, 25 darks.
  18. From the album: Mike's Images

    The Lagoon Nebula ( Messier 8, NGC 6523 ) in the constellation Sagittarius - by Mike O'Day ( https://500px.com/mikeoday ) The Laboon Nebula ( M8 ) is visible to the naked eye under dark skies from most latitudes except the far north. Seemingly covering an area about three times that of the full Moon, M8 actually covers an area somewhat greater than 110 light years and is around 4300 light years from Earth in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm of the Milkyway galaxy. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Messier 8, NGC 6523 - Lagoon Nebula. also contains: NGC 6526 NGC 6530 NGC 6533 IC 1271 IC 4678 7SGR 9SGR Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Orion auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D300 (unmodified) (14bit NEF). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 20 x 120 sec ISO400. 26 x 30 sec ISO 1600. 23 x 240 sec ISO 200. PixInsight and Photoshop. 2 August 14 . re-processed 24 April 2016 to include the additional subs ( the first version only made use of the 23 x 240 sec ISO 200 subs ) and putting use the processing lessons I have learnt over the past year.

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2016 - all rights reserved

  19. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    Modified Canon 1100D with Canon 500mm f/4 L IS lens @ ISO1600. AstroTrac TT320 Mount. 25x 60 second lights 20x Darks 20x Flats 20x Bias Stacked in DSS and processed in PS. Taken on holiday in Fuerteventura.
  20. CKemu

    Dumbbell Nebula

    From the album: Astro Collection

    Love this little nebula, always a joy to look at and always a frustration to photograph as it never seems to go well, with either gear failure or weather getting in the way every time I try!
  21. NGC6559 at the center of the milkyway is a photo I created from RGB filters only and at BIN1. Telescope: ASA 12'' F3.6 Mount: DDM 85 Unguided Camera: FLI 16200 Mono Filters: Astrodon Thanks for watching Haim Huli My Flickr Page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/101543943@N04/
  22. This is the 1st test night for this disabled AA with my new moonlite auto focer mini v2 control ,1st time collecting data on the Horsehead nebula with any camera that I've owned , {30s } 25 frames luminous and 10 red channel combined in AIP4win and PScs2 , astronomy tools . I used an asi 174MM cooled -20c Zwo mini 5 efw , 8 in astrograph , lxd55 mount guided with Orion 50mm mini w/ helical . Captured in Sharpcap live stacking , I'm 0n my way finally got my autofocus set up correctly in Sgp to run a sequence later that week . It's a great feeling when everything is working together.
  23. Hi Guys, I thought I would share with you my first DSO taken with my new Orion 8" Ritchey Chretien F8 Telescope. The frame is made up of 12 x 4min shots, no light or dark frames, using my Sony A7Rii camera. The camera had the long exposure noise reduction switched on, which does help to reduce the total number of stars captured by the camera, as the Sony A7Rii does tend to overdo the number of stars captured. The telescope was mounted on my trusty skywatcher NEQ6 mount and the guiding was via PHD 'of course' via my skywatcher ED50 guide scope. The shots were taken from my back garden in Stowmarket, Suffolk where I believe I am a Bortie 4 location, so the skies are mostly dark, with just a little light pollution from the main town, no filters used. My normal telescope is a Skywatcher ED100 Pro Esprit F5.5, which is an incredibly sharp scope, but with a wide 550mm field of view, great for capturing the whole of Andromeda but a struggle with smaller images like the Iris Nebula. I will say the Orion RC scope did need to be collimated out of the box, which was a little disappointing, and it was not just a little out of collimation, it was a long way out, but with the use of a collimating tool, I soon had it dialled in. First impressions of the Orion Ritchey Chretien 8" Telescope are fair, not super impressed, as it is nowhere near as sharp as my ED100 Esprit, but then this is to be expected based on price and telescope type, however, the pictures it has produced are pretty good, if you downscale the full 42MP from the Sony A7Rii camera, as can be seen in this picture. I purchased this 8" Orion Ritchey Chretien OTA mainly for Planetary work, but as yet I have not had a chance to 'get onto' a planet, fingers crossed some clear nights will arrive soon, so I can try. I welcome comments, many thanks Jamie
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