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Found 195 results

  1. Messy I know, but with what I have to work with atm, I'm really happy so far. Hoping to add more data NGC 7000 North American Nebula Exif: Canon 550D 55mm (cropped) @ f / 4 3162 seconds (542 x 6 seconds) ISO 6400 Taken over 3 nights under Bortle 5/6 No darks / offsets
  2. Rhushikesh-Canisminor

    Finally Veil Nebula!

    Finally managed to observe the Veil nebula on last Saturday! I remember spending too many hours searching for it during my observations. The milky way band in the morning came up really nice ,almost a continuous band from scorpious to Cassiopeia (managed to see that too!). Thinking about giving veil a last try, we pointed our skywatcher 8 inch dobsonian scope with 32mm plossl eyepiece and lumicon UHC filter and BAM! It was right there, bright enough to show it for first timers too! Looked like an arc or smoke chain coming out of matchstick. All The reports say that Veil nebula is an easy object, but I have had hard time seeing it all this time, while easily observing Flame nebula and Horsehead nebula through smaller telescopes. Maybe it's the real dark skies...or just some plain luck! Clear skies!
  3. Carina Nebula with the bright unstable star Eta Carinae in the centre of the image. edit ( 27 March ): Tweak to shadow levels to bring out more detail and also a slight reduction in the brightness of the highlights. A much larger version ( 4562 x 3072 6062 x 4082) is available on my Flickr page. previous version: Carinae Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) From Wikipedia ... "Eta Carinae is a highly luminous hypergiant star. Estimates of its mass range from 100 to 150 times the mass of the Sun, and its luminosity is about four million times that of the Sun." This HDR image is constructed from 12 sets of exposures ranging from 1/8 sec ( to capture the bright centre of Eta Carinae ) through to 240 seconds. Total exposure time around 13 hours 17-19 March 2018 Image details: Objects in image: Hypergiant, Eta Carinae ( HD 93308 ) in the centre of the Homunculus Nebula Carina Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) Keyhole Nebula Open Star Clusters: - Trumpler 14, 15, 16 - Collinder 232 Field of view ..... 59' 18.2" x 39' 56.0" Image centre ...... RA: 10 45 01.762 Dec: -59 40 52.87 Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 17, 18 & 19 March 2018 ): 12 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8s to 240s ) all at ISO250. ( 181 x 240sec + 10 to 20 each for the other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 12 sets HDR combination Pixinsight March 2018
  4. Hi, I was asked on a Swedish forum to put an "Astronomical Dictionary" on my homepage. I have made a test page in an easy form. Astronomical related words linked to wikipedia. It aims to the beginners in astronomy so it should not be too complicated words. http://astrofriend.eu/astronomy/astronomical-dictionary/astronomical-dictionary.html Let me know if it's useful and and I shall add more words. /Lars
  5. Open star clusters Trumpler 14 & 16 and Collinder 232 with the Carina Nebula a very colourful backdrop Eta Carinae and star clusters Trumpler 14 & 16 and Collinder 232 ( please click / tap on image to see larger ( 1632 x 1632 ) and sharper image ) The stand out member of Trumpler 16 is the unstable hypergiant Eta Carina ( just to the left of the Keyhole Nebula ). A larger ( 3264 x 3264 ) version of this image can be found on my Flickr page. Capture and processing details can be found in this post.
  6. Eta Carinae Nebula ( NGC 3373 )with the bright unstable star Eta Carinae in the centre of the image. This is still a WIP - I am capturing more data tonight and the processing needs tweaking ... Edit: A quick and dirty adjustment on my ipad ( the original is too green I think ) ............. Original: From Wikipedia ... "Eta Carinae is a highly luminous hypergiant star. Estimates of its mass range from 100 to 150 times the mass of the Sun, and its luminosity is about four million times that of the Sun." This HDR image is constructed from 12 sets of exposures ranging from 1/8 sec ( to capture the bright centre of Eta Carinae ) through to 240 seconds. Total exposure time around 9 hours. 17-19 March 2018 I am surprised at how bright the colours came out; the stretch was performed with multiple applications of "marskedStretch" and that usually results in subdued colours and I have not touched the saturation ( this is just how it came out following the stretch and brightness adjustment with curves ). ps. is it "Eta Carina" or "Eta Carinae" ?
  7. Re-processed 3rd March 2018 - no luck so far getting any more data; I will try again when the moon goes away ....... With my unmodified D5300 DSLR, the HII nebula Gum 15 is barely brighter than the surrounding diffuse red glow that surrounds it and it all sits way down in the noise. I decided to share this small WIP version as I think it may be a while before I can get the data I need to impove it. This one has way too much noise ( and hence quite heavy noise reduction / smoothing ) as the detail is very faint and I needed a massive stretch to pull it out - more data will help with that I think. Seen small, from a very long way away, I don't think it is too bad Gum 15 and Open Cluster CR197 in Vela Unmodified Nikon D5300 Orion Optics CT12" Newtonian with ASA Coma Corrector ~ effective focal length 1400mm @ f 4.7 HDR image in 10 sets ( all at ISO 250 ) - 35 x 240 sec + 5 each for exposure durations from 0.5 to 120 seconds
  8. Hi again! Last time I imaged IC5070 for approx 3 hours, then as Orion rose up I decide to use up the last of the clear skies imaging B33/NGC2024. 15 x 600s at ISO1600 with Canon 1000d, ED80 FFx0.85, darks and bias. Looking any advise on detail etc, how does guiding look, focus, etc. I'd like to try to progress so feedback welcome. It is still noisy, so definitely need more subs. I've also lost the plot somewhere with it somewhere during processing as there is artefacts all over the show! Thanks in advance Adam.
  9. During recent night I've managed to take only 50 minutes of OIII in narrowband so I could add to previously gathered Hydrogen. This is more like experiment as it is my first bicolor image. Scope: Skywatcher Evostar 80ED DS-Pro with flattener Mount: NEQ6-Pro Camera: QHY168C Filter Baader 7nm H-alpha , Baader O-III CCD Guiding camera: ZWO ASI120MC Guiding scope: finderscope 16x300s exposure at -10°C (80 min total) in H-Alpha 10x300s exposure at -10°C (50 min total) in OIII
  10. No doubt many of you already know about this but I came accross this free ebook and I thought some of you might be interested ... The book has 188 pages and includes around 70 odd black and white images of nebulae and clusters captured in the few years at the end of the 1800s and early 1900s. One example is plate 55, the Trifid Nebula The ebook can be downloaded for free from : http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/36470
  11. M42 and M43: my first target using the new Orion SteadPix EZ. Once all set up, Orion's SteadyPix EZ works really well (though it can be tough swapping lenses on a dark night). This pic is actually just one shot made into three layers: 1 layer for is the entire picture, one layer with the main body of M42 cut out, and one layer consisting only of M43. I stacked and processed them on the iPhone with the Photoshop Mix application. I found that playing with the stacking transition settings (Blend) yielded the best results when using the following options: Normal, Brighten or Punch. Cutting away portions of the various layers allowed me to expose just the portion I wanted, so the dimmer nebulousness came through without destroying the rest of the photo. For me iPhone afocal AP is the way to go... until I can trick my wife into allowing me to buy a an EQ mount, guide scope, imaging OTA, CCD sensors, etc... 13 January 2018 Memphis, Tennessee, USA Sky Watcher 10" Dob iPhone 8 Plus Sky: NELM 4.5-5 Bortle Class 7-8 Edit: Used a cheap bluetooth shutter remote to actually take the photo
  12. The Monkey Head Nebula The Monkey Head Nebula is an HII emission nebula located 6400 light years away in the constellation of Orion. The nebula is associated with an open cluster of mag. +6.8 located at its centre. With a diameter of approximately 40 arcminutes, the nebula is larger than the full Moon. There is much debate over the correct designation of this object as some sources cite the nebula as being NGC 2174 and some stating the nebula as being NGC2174/5. What is not in contention is that Stewart Sharpless logged this object as SH2-252 in his second and final catalogue completed in 1959. Personally, I go for the nebula being NGC 2174 and the open cluster being NGC 2175! It was and I guess still is, my intention to produce a bi-colour version of this image but the skies have not been kind and just the Ha displayed here has taken 5 difficult nights of cloud-dodging although in fairness, it has been CCD Commander and my automation project that have done most of the starting and ending of the sessions! I decided that with the weather currently deteriorating, I may as well post up the project thus far. Image Stats Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150 Flattener: Sky-Watcher Esprit specific Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Filter: Astrodon 3nm Ha Subframes: 22 x 1800 sec Ha Integration: 11 hours Control: CCD Commander Capture: MaxIm DL Calibration, Stacking and Deconvolution: PixInsight Post-Processing: PhotoShop PS3 Full Resolution version Location of the open star cluster NGC 2175 Visually This target lies 2.3° to the southeast of mag. +3.3 Propus and is a two for one object, comprising an open cluster (NGC 2175) and an emission nebula (NGC 2174) although most astronomers associate the nebula with NGC 2175. Lying in a rich star field, the almost circular shape is punctured by a dent in its western edge which stands out particularly well in images and helps to form the ‘monkey-head’ shape from which the nebula gets its common name. Inboard of this dent towards the east is an area of intense star birth. You’ll need a very large telescope to discern the shape of the nebula but a 4- 6-inch telescope will show the open cluster very well. Location of Nebula and associated Star Cluster RA: 06h09m 36.0s DE:+20°29'00" Star Birth Region On the eastern limb there is a dent pushing westward into the nebula and here there is a huge stellar nursery that featured in the Hubble Space Telescope’s IR image (http://hubblesite.org/news_release/news/2014-18) released on 17th March, 2014. The nebula is comprised mainly of hydrogen gas which is ionised by the intense ultraviolet radiation emitted by the hot young stars within the nebula. This ionisation causes the hydrogen to glow red. Also associated with this nebula are some faint regions of reflection nebulosity giving a hazy blue appearance and some relatively faint dust lanes add interest to the interior.
  13. The Rosette Nebula and Cluster ( NGC 2237 and 2244 ) in the constellation Monoceros edit: updated 30th Dec with improved colour balance and slightly increased brightness ... ...... original: ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) Still a work-in-progress really... with only 10 x 4min exposures for the main 'lights' before the clouds came over. I will try to add some more data when the moon has gone I am still experimenting with how to get the best out of the D7500. With the very warm nights ( low to mid 20s all night ) the 'warm pixels' are very noticeable so I reverted to my old practice of in-camera dark subtraction. This worked quite well and produced a nice smooth noise floor in the integrated images - albeit at the expense of more exposures. ................. Identification: The Rosette Nebula ( NGC 2237 ) is a large, circular emission nebula in the constellation Monoceros. It surrounds a cluster of hot, young stars known as the Rosette Cluster ( NGC 2244 ). ( SkySafari ) NGC 2237, 2244 Caldwell 49, 50 North is up. .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 23 Dec 2017 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO400. 10 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s imaged ~ +/- 1.5hrs either side of meridian maximum altitude ~ 51.3 deg above north horizon Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and in-camera dark subtraction Integration in 9 sets HDR combination Image Plate Solution =================================== Resolution ........ 0.633 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.181 deg Focal ............. 1367.90 mm Pixel size ........ 4.20 um Field of view ..... 58' 59.4" x 39' 15.0" Image center ...... RA: 06 31 55.638 Dec: +04 56 30.84 ===================================
  14. The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the constellation Fornax edit: new version with new long exposure data ( 52 x 240sec ) and better dark subtraction / dithering to remove streaks in the noise and amp glow. This also allowed for a greater stretch revealing more faint data in the galaxy and small faint fuzzies in the image .. The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in Fornax ( please click / tap to see larger ) and below I have added a 100% crop of new version: ........ original image: NGC 1365 ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) ............... The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) in the Constellation Fornax Below the equator, not seen from much of the Northern hemisphere, NGC 1365 passes very nearly directly overhead an observer situated near Cape Town, as Sir John Herschel was in November of 1837, or near Sydney, as I was, almost exactly 180 years later, when I photographed this “remarkable nebula” that is numbered 2552 in his book of observations from the Cape. Not called a “nebula” now, of course, this striking object is one of the nearest and most studied examples of a barred spiral ( SB ) galaxy that also has an active galactic nuclei resulting in its designation as a Seyfert galaxy. At around 60 M light years from Earth, NGC 1365 is still seen to occupy a relatively large area ( 12 by 6 arc minutes ) due to its great size; at some 200,000 light years or so across, NGC 1365 is nearly twice as wide as the Milky Way and considerably wider than both the Sculptor and Andromeda galaxies. This High Dynamic Range ( HDR ) image is built up from multiple exposures ranging from 4 to 120 seconds with the aim of capturing the faint detail in the spiral arms of the galaxy whilst also retaining colour in the brightest star ( the orange-red 7th magnitude giant, HD 22425 ). Also, scattered throughout the image, and somewhat more difficult to see, are numerous and far more distant galaxies with apparent magnitudes of 16 to 18 or greater. Mike O'Day ................. Identification: The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy New General Catalogue - NGC 1365 General Catalogue - GC 731 John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837 Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179 ESO 358-17 IRAS 03317-3618 RA (2000.0) 3h 33m 37.2 s DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5" 10th magnitude Seyfert-type galaxy in the Fornaux cluster of galaxies 200 Kly diameter 60 Mly distance .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 22 Nov 2017 ) 6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 120s ) all at ISO400. 70 x 120s + 5 each @ 4s to 60s total around 2.5hrs Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks Integration in 6 sets HDR combination Image - Plate Solution ========================================== Resolution ........ 1.328 arcsec/px Rotation .......... -0.008 deg ( North is up ) Field of view ..... 58' 8.6" x 38' 47.5" Image center ...... RA: 03 33 41.182 Dec: -36 07 46.71 ==========================================
  15. Thor’s Helmet ( NGC 2359 ) ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) Summary: An HDR image that captures as much of the faint detail in the nebula as I can whilst also attempting to show the “true” colours of the stars ( without burnt out highlights ). Nikon D5300 ( unmodified ), taken 18/19 Jan 2018, exposures ranging from 2s to 240s ( 116 x 240 sec + 5 each for other exposures ) Full details in main post :
  16. “The Blue Bunny Nebula” .......... Edit: 27 Jan 2018 - updated again to try to draw more faint nebulosity out of the background; ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ......... Edit: 24 Jan 2018 - stars a little brighter and tighter with no change to the rest of the image ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ................. original: Thor's Helmet ( NGC 2359 ) in the constellation Canis Major Thor’s Helmet ( Duck Nebula, NGC 2359 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) This HDR image shows the bright nebula Thor’s Helmet in a sea of colourful stars against a background of red from dust and HA emissions. The stars in this image range from the brightest ( bottom right, HD 56501 ) at magnitude +7.7 to around +20 or more. HDR capture and processing allows all of the stars to be portrayed in colour without any burnt-out highlights. The colours of the stars and nebula are as close as I can get them to their "true colours" by using a "daylight colour balance" and allowing for the extinction of blue-green due to atmospheric absorption/scattering ( mean altitude during capture ~ 60deg ). The blue star in the centre of the bubble of expanding stellar material is HD 56925 ( WR7 ) - a massive, unstable and short-lived Wolf-Rayet star that one day will detonate in a supernova. Image details: NGC 2359 Thor’s Helmet / Duck Nebula: Magnitude +11.5, RA (2000.0) 7h 15m 37s, Dec -13deg 12' 8", approx. 1800 light years away HD 56925 / Wolf-Rayet 7 ( WR7 ) ( blue 11.5 mag star at centre of “bubble” ) Haffner 6 ( open ster cluster centre left of image ) Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.318 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Focal ............. 1398.41 mm Field of view ..... 57' 40.8" x 38' 29.0" Image center ...... RA: 07 18 36.509 Dec: -13 11 53.38 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 18 & 19 Jan 2018 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 116 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s Processing ( Pixinsight - 20 Jan 18 ) Calibration: master bias, master dark and master flat Integration in 9 sets HDR combination arcSinH stretch
  17. The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) Bright Nebula NGC 6188 and open cluster NGC 6193 are embedded 4,300 light years away in the Sagittarius arm of our Milky Way galaxy and can be seen with the naked eye south of Scorpius in the constellation of Ara. With powerful stellar winds and energetic ultra-violet radiation, massive stars sculpt the interstellar gas and dust of the nebula into wonderful shapes and cause the interstellar gas to brightly fluoresce. Closer to the hot young stars of the cluster, bright blue “sunlight” reflects off the clouds of gas and dust to produce the blue reflection nebulae seenin the image. Magnitude +5.19, RA 16h 41m 42s, Dec -48deg 48' 46". Approx. 3800 light years away. Image details: This is an HDR image constructed from exposures ranging from 2 seconds to 240 seconds in length. The aim was to capture the faint stars and details in the nebula whilst at the same time maintaining colour in the bright stars without clipping the highlights. Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.336 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 90.002 deg ( North is to the right ) Focal ............. 1475.57 mm Pixel size ........ 9.56 um Field of view ..... 58' 28.5" x 39' 0.8" Image center ...... RA: 16 40 09.903 Dec: -48 41 27.00 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture ( 24 June 2017 ). 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO800. 34 x 240s + 10 each @ 2s to 120s. Processing ( Pixinsight - 19 Aug 2017, 13 Jan 2018 ). Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 8 sets. HDR combination. ......... This is a reprocessed version using the data I captured earlier in the year...
  18. edit: Processed in January from data captured in June and it has been pointed out to me that, as per the rules, this image can not be considered for the competition. .............. The Fighting Dragons of Ara ( NGC 6188 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) Image details: This is an HDR image constructed from exposures ranging from 2 seconds to 240 seconds in length. The aim was to capture the faint stars and details in the nebula whilst at the same time maintaining colour in the bright stars without clipping the highlights. Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.336 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 90.002 deg ( North is to the right ) Focal ............. 1475.57 mm Pixel size ........ 9.56 um Field of view ..... 58' 28.5" x 39' 0.8" Image center ...... RA: 16 40 09.903 Dec: -48 41 27.00 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture ( 24 June 2017 ). 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO800. 34 x 240s + 10 each @ 2s to 120s. Processing ( Pixinsight - 19 Aug 2017, 13 Jan 2018 ). Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 8 sets. HDR combination
  19. Afternoon All, After what seems like too long I have finally managed to do a bit more serious Astro imaging and revisit the forum (been over 2 years IIRC), as it turns out having two children under 5 and UK skies is not a good mix for a hobby in astronomy, especially if you value sleep. Anyhow in those 2 years of downtime have taken the time to tear down the EQ6, overhaul the bearings, take out some backlash, re-grease with lithium grease, flush out the cobwebs from the roll off shed, clean out the MN190 (also infested with spiders worryingly), retake darks and bias files and overhaul the usb/power cables to the scope. Finally after all this and some minor teething issues I got a few clear nights between Nov 2017 and Jan 2018, so I decided to have a go at NGC1977 - The Running Man Nebula in Orion . 4 Hours of Luminance at with 300s subs 1 Hour each of R,G,B in 300s subs Atik383L+ mono (at -20) and MN190 Stacked in DSS and Post-Proc in PS Image reduced by 50% to fit to screen better Really happy being able to get back into this again Keith
  20. I have been using a 1 1/4 inch UHC filter but this had been causing bad vignetting that was difficult to remove during processing. So, I left out the filter so there was a 'straight 2"' opening into the camera. However, the light pollution meant that 45 s was the maximum exposure. Anyway, I took 65 x 45s of Orion and 165 x 45 s of the Crab - one looks good (for me ) and one looks bad, even for me ! I tried the processing several times but this was the best I could do. So, the advice I am after is, is the poor image of the crab due to the nature of the nebula? my camera is unmodded.
  21. The Rosette Star Cluster and Nebula ( NGC 2244 & 2237 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) This is the Inverted B&W version buried in my previous post ( I quite liked the way the inverted B&W brings out the star cluster and so I thought it deserved its own thread )
  22. ( please click / tap to see larger ) Identification: The Rosette Nebula ( NGC 2237 ) is a large, circular emission nebula in the constellation Monoceros. It surrounds a cluster of hot, young stars known as the Rosette Cluster ( NGC 2244 ). ( SkySafari ) NGC 2237, 2244 Caldwell 49, 50 North is up. .................. Capture Details: Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1400mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D7500 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.7mm, 5568x3712 @ 4.196um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 23 Dec 2017 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO400. 10 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s imaged ~ +/- 1.5hrs either side of meridian maximum altitude ~ 51.3 deg above north horizon Processing ( Pixinsight ) Calibration: master bias, master flat and in-camera dark subtraction Integration in 9 sets HDR combination Image Plate Solution =================================== Resolution ........ 0.633 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.181 deg Focal ............. 1367.90 mm Pixel size ........ 4.20 um Field of view ..... 58' 59.4" x 39' 15.0" Image center ...... RA: 06 31 55.638 Dec: +04 56 30.84 =================================== ... More information, etc., here:
  23. lux eterna

    NGC 7635 - The Bubble

    Hi all, Last November I imaged the Bubble on a few occations with my Meade LX200-ACF and Nikon D7000 on SW HEQ5 Pro, guided with a standalone Nexguider. I managed some 10 hours under pretty good skies, plus 2 hours with H-alpha filter from my small town backyard. So almost 12 hours together (after rejecting every sub with just the slightest defect like non-circular or diffuse small stars). Registering (aligning) was done in Registar, and stacking & processing in PS. I also used the Straton software that removes (most of) the stars, after initial stretching, then I put them back using the "lighten" blending mode. C & C most welcome Ragnar
  24. steppenwolf

    IC 410 - The Tadpoles in Ha

    IC 410 – The Tadpoles IC 410 (‘The Tadpoles’) is a fascinating region of nebulosity in the Constellation of Auriga. This dusty star-forming region is part of a larger area of nebulosity that also contains IC405 (’The Flaming Star Nebula’) located around 13000 light years away. The gorgeous shapes within the nebula are sculpted from immense stellar winds from radiation developed by the large, hot young stars in the embedded open star cluster, NGC 1893. The two immense, dense structures radiating away from the centre of the nebula give it its common name ‘The Tadpoles’. These are the remnants of vast pillars of dust and gas left over from the formation of the star cluster itself. My main imaging focus recently has been to capture Ha data for B33 (‘The Horsehead Nebula’) but this object only rises above my local horizon after 22.00 so to fill the time while I wait for the Horse to arrive, I decided to capture IC 410 but the clear nights have – of course – coincided with the presence of the Moon ......... thank goodness for 3nm filters! I added my most recent data to that captured in October, 2017 to complete this phase of the image. Image Stats Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150 Flattener: Sky-Watcher Esprit specific Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Filter: Astrodon 3nm Ha Subframes: 22 x 1800 sec Ha Integration: 11 hours Control: CCD Commander Capture: MaxIM DL Calibration and Stacking: PixInsight Post-Processing: PhotoShop PS3 The Tadpoles
  25. Heres my version of NGC 7000 and the Pelican nebula, taken back in 2015, through my William optics zenithstar 70ED with focal reducer. To fit it all in I did a 4 pane mosaic. Think the subs where 15 x 6 mins for each pane..........hope you like.
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