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Found 150 results

  1. Like the lunatic that I am, I decided to get the scope out last week during that storm that was passing through. The skies were clear and there was no moon about, so I figured why not! Only problem was the 17-20 mph winds, lol. I got 2 hrs of subs but had to throw away half of them due to guiding problems more so than the wind, amazingly. This was the 2nd time in a row i'd had Dec guiding problems, and that's after about 2 years of not having a single problem guiding. After the 1st hr of wasted subs, I turned off Fast Switching in Dec and chose to only Dither in RA, and the Dec problems mostly went away, at least to allow me to capture 1 hr of 'still dodgy but just about useable' subs. Once M42 disappeared behind the neighbour's roof, I then re-calibrated on the Celestial Equator (Dec 0) and when I switched to the Pinwheel Galaxy I was able to guide as normal again (with Fast Switching and Dithering in both RA and Dec both turned on again) and didn't lose any subs, despite the wind, so I've decided that from now on I won't be calibrating at the target itself, i'm always going to do it at Dec 0. I decided to throw this in with another 1 hr of subs (plus 10 x 30s for the core) that I took back in Jan 2017 (has it really been that long?!). That hr also had issues, with some weird streaking in the lower left that I could never work out what caused it. The D5300 hadn't been modified at that stage either. So I fired it all in to APP and decided to stack it anyway, and give it a quick process. Then chose to crank it up to 11 on the colour front, just for laughs. It won't be going on the wall anytime soon, lol, but I suppose it came out a bit better than I was expecting, all things considered. 20 x 360s with an IDAS-D1 D5300, 80ED, HEQ5-Pro. Stacked in APP, processed in PS. CS! edit - I forgot to downscale it - so no pixel peeping allowed
  2. heyyyyy its meeeee, kronosss and today there is a full moon(i missed out on the eclipse because of clouds... huh i guess i gotta wait another 19 years...)and i went out in the b ackyard with my 3" reflector telescope the celestron firstscope! The seeing was kinda bad... the full moon had less detail than the quarter.... anyway i figured i could see something else then i turned left and i saw orion(book-pun -intended) and the stars were quite faint(bad seeing full moon and light pollution.) i tried locating the orion nebula, after some time i stumbled across a small extremely faint smudge just barely distinguishable, then i turned and zoomed in,(75x) i saw 2 small kind of blurry spots of light (focusing wasnt great andi have the worst 4mm eyepiece in history...) with a very faint dark grey light around them keep in mind i saw that light when not looking directly at the nebula(read that it makes light appear brighter somewhere, it works lol) sooo is what i am seeing indeed it? or are my eyes playing tricks on me? Cheers Kronos
  3. Update: 3rd June Re-processed to remove slight magenta tint caused by the non-uniform removal of light pollution by the DBE process ( it was being fooled by the very bright image centre ). The globular star cluster Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) A full size image can be found here. original below ..... A newly captured ( May 2018 ) image of the great southern globular star cluster, Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus - ( please click / tap image to see larger and sharper ) A full size ( ~ 6000 x 4000 ) image can be found here ....... This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the colours of the stars, including in the core. Image details: Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( up is North ) Focal ............. 1375.99 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 20.9" x 38' 55.1" Image center ...... RA: 13 26 45.065 Dec: -47 28 27.26 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher Eq8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)\ Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( May 2018 ) 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  4. Hi Guys, I thought I would share with you my first DSO taken with my new Orion 8" Ritchey Chretien F8 Telescope. The frame is made up of 12 x 4min shots, no light or dark frames, using my Sony A7Rii camera. The camera had the long exposure noise reduction switched on, which does help to reduce the total number of stars captured by the camera, as the Sony A7Rii does tend to overdo the number of stars captured. The telescope was mounted on my trusty skywatcher NEQ6 mount and the guiding was via PHD 'of course' via my skywatcher ED50 guide scope. The shots were taken from my back garden in Stowmarket, Suffolk where I believe I am a Bortie 4 location, so the skies are mostly dark, with just a little light pollution from the main town, no filters used. My normal telescope is a Skywatcher ED100 Pro Esprit F5.5, which is an incredibly sharp scope, but with a wide 550mm field of view, great for capturing the whole of Andromeda but a struggle with smaller images like the Iris Nebula. I will say the Orion RC scope did need to be collimated out of the box, which was a little disappointing, and it was not just a little out of collimation, it was a long way out, but with the use of a collimating tool, I soon had it dialled in. First impressions of the Orion Ritchey Chretien 8" Telescope are fair, not super impressed, as it is nowhere near as sharp as my ED100 Esprit, but then this is to be expected based on price and telescope type, however, the pictures it has produced are pretty good, if you downscale the full 42MP from the Sony A7Rii camera, as can be seen in this picture. I purchased this 8" Orion Ritchey Chretien OTA mainly for Planetary work, but as yet I have not had a chance to 'get onto' a planet, fingers crossed some clear nights will arrive soon, so I can try. I welcome comments, many thanks Jamie
  5. Dear all, After tinkering around several nights, i finally got around getting the Orion starshoot Autoguider (also called SSAG) into focus using a small 50mm guidescope. I want to share the info as i have received a ton of great advice from SGL users, and maybe there's a noob like me out there with the same problem? The biggest problem for me was that i expected the combination of the 50mm guidescope and the SSAG to be balanced to each other... but they are not. In other words, if you completey insert the SSAG into the guidescope, you will not be able to achieve focus. The distance between the foremost frontend of the guidscope to the back end of the SSAG should be around 21.8 cm. If you take a look at the photo below, you can see that the SSAG is not completely inserted into the guidescope; in my case, there is a space of 1.25 cm between the SSAG and the inmost position and about the frontend of the scope is about 0.3cm screwed out. These positions should get you very close to the optimal focus position. Getting the driver and installing PHD2 is straight forward. I suggest setting camera gain to 95, and exposure to auto. For final focusing, fire up PHD2 and select a star- PHD2 will show you the SNR (signal to noise ratio- the higher it is, the better). The do quarter turns of the scope's front lens, always checking the SNR after each turn, repeating the process until you reach the point of maximum SNR. Congratulations- you are on focus! To make all this more repeatable, you could get T2 adapters and adjustment rings so that you need no guessing around where the focus point is. That is left as an exercise to the reader
  6. HI All, I have an entertaining video to share with you which is perfect for those just starting out and wanting to taste a bit of astrophotography without spending a lot of money. I image from London and managed to get a pretty good shot of Orion for just £150. This video runs through where I bought the equipment, why I bought it and how I used it to capture a Orion and some of the trials and tribulations I had to deal with on the way. Any questions please ask! Enjoy! FYI I shot this last year but with Orion now beginning to rise over the rooftops of London I thought this would be a good time to share it.
  7. Can anyone identify this Orion camera and perhaps provide me with a digital copy (or link) for the user guide? I got this and it has no part number or any unique identifier to help me locate the documentation. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  8. The Cat's Paw Nebula ( NGC 6334 ) in Scorpius updated ( slight tweak to colour balance, a little brighter and tad more contrast ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here ) ...... original: ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here ) ……………………... Also known as the Bear Claw Nebula, NGC 6334 is an emission nebula near the scorpion's tail in the Scorpius constellation. Image details: Image centre ...... RA: 17 20 08.185 Dec: -35 52 30.91 Field of view ..... 57' 37.8" x 38' 51.8" Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( July 2018 ) 6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 168 x 4 min frames plus ~10 frames each for the shorter exposures Processing: Calibration: bias, dark and flat Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight July 2018
  9. Greetings to you all, I am begging some expertise and assistance (again!!) I managed to get 35 minutes on orion last night and have successfully stacked in DSS. My issues seem to start in processing. I was hoping to see a 'flame' coloured flame nebula but it stubbornly stays red which may simply be down to not enough time at the camera....dew was the issue (late autumn here) and i haven't figured out how to process images from different nights imaging) Anyhow, i have posted here my attempt at processing (gimp) and also the original DSS file in the hope that some of you may be able to apply your expertise and see if you can't make it look more pleasing......and also help me by explaining how you did it! Also, I would really like to know where you think I've gone wrong on my processing.....have I over/under cooked it etc. As ever I am most grateful for any assistance.......processing is a tough nut to crack! Thanks in advance all of you and below are the technicals. Seeing was a bit misty and orion was low to the western horizon. yes, its upside down.....i'm down under! canon 40D modified, 135mm, f5, ISO 1600 skywatcher star adventurer 18x120seconds lights 18x120seconds darks 20x8000/sec bias stacked in DSS Ok.....strike this one.....after spending an hour and a half uploading 61mb files.....it's somehow totally failed to post them permission to swear loudly !!
  10. Captured back in early October, I didn't pay quite enough attention to the framing - I should have moved the camera up and right a bit and I could have gotten the whole belt in the picture... the headline stuff is in there though, M42/M43, Horsehead and Flame etc 10x 200 second subs taken with a modified Canon 650D through a Borg 55 f/3.6 (focal length 200mm). There's a load of red stuff in there that needs more exposures (or slightly longer ones) to show more off so I will redo this one and frame it correctly... or do a mosaic of Orion or... well, it'll depend on the number (or lack) of clear nights!! Unfortunately there are haloes on Alnitak and Alnilam, I may have a solution for the next time I cover this area Processing wise I'm going to have to sort out shorter exposures for the Orion Nebula and longer for the rest... James
  11. Nadine2704

    Orion Nebula

    From the album: Astrophotography

    Taken with my iOptron Skytracker and Canon 70d with 300mm lens.
  12. From the album: Wide-field (not barn-door)

    Alternately developped version where some gamma stretching was used rather than brightness stretching. Hence most saturated values are pale or grey/white. Shows a bit more contrast though.

    © Fabien COUTANT

  13. Good evening, I thought I would try to take a photo of Orion tonight, but using the instructions in a magazine I can't seem to get the thing in focus. Image has been resized, so it looks a little sharper than it is! I have a Nikon D80, with a 50mm 1.8 lens attached. (I don't really have any great lenses - [18-105mm], [55-200mm]) Settings for this photo were ISO 400, F1.8 for 15 seconds. I focused on Jupiter with auto then went to Manual for the shot. Thanks for any tips!!!
  14. Hey everyone ! I am new to this site , don't know how to properly use it , but hope someone will help me As the topic says , I am trying to buy my first telescope , and am quite excited for it. I have been reading wuite a lot about astronomy , so I know most of the basics , but have many many unanswered questions ... xD I was originally looking for a scope for viewing the planets , but well , after learning more , I thought that maybe a scope that can show only planets will eventually get a BIT boring , and will not be used much (although I still admire the planets and still will want to observe them). Just a quick info on me : I live in a city , have no place to go / or car to transport my scope to a darker place , live in a building , hope to observe from the rooftop. My ONLY CONCERN about this is that from my balcony I can see Vega at night , and as depressing as it may sound , nothing more .It may be because there are buildings covering my view (I at least hope so that's the case) or light pollution , although the place I live is in the orange to red zone in many light pollution maps. So originally I stumbled upon the Orion Starseeker IV 80mm GoTo refractor. http://www.telescope.com/Telescopes/GoTo-Computerized-Telescopes/Orion-StarSeeker-IV-80mm-GoTo-Refractor-Telescope/c/1/sc/15/p/113919.uts Thought it was good for the GoTo and stuff , but after doing some research , got concerned about the sturdyness of the mount.Some said it was too shaky (I have almost constant winds of about 10mph at night here) . Plus after some while I discovered DeepSpace and got even more interested in it than the planets . So I started to seek for reflectors. After a while I discarded Dobsonians as an option , cause I do want to do astrophotography ( just amateur , not gonna spend money on expensive DSLR s or sth) . And maybe in the future I will want to do some more serious astrophotography , so it will be very sad , if I have to change the scope later , if I want to... So after doing some research I am currently watching these scopes . 1. Orion 9827 AstroView 6 Equatorial Reflector Telescope . https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000XMSR0/ref=psdc_499154_t1_B01N2HJBQC 2. SkyWatcher Explorer-150P EQ3-2 Reflector. https://www.firstlightoptics.com/reflectors/skywatcher-explorer-150p-eq3-2.html The only downside of these is that they're not GoTo (The second one has an option , but it's out of my price range) , but I think an additional RA motor drive will do the thing. At lease if I will be able to find anything in my sky ... That's it ! If you own/have used any of these scopes tell me more about them ! What you like/dont like etc. ANY GENERAL ADVICE IS APPERCIATED . Thanks !
  15. Here's my first attempt at bi-colour HOO narrowband, using the OIII filter I got for Christmas Please do click through to Flickr and have a look at it with the magnifying glass, there's loads of detail in there. 23x600s Ha, 20x60s Ha, 10x600s OIII, 8x60s OIII, darks, flats and bias, equipment as per sig, Pixinsight. It was an absolute joy to process this, it was singing to me from the very first trial combination of stacks. I had lots of fun playing with colour balances (actually it's more like HOo, and then I let the red grow a bit, looks like a watermelon to me). Had fun with the HDR too. I've done some HaLRGB before, and I have the skies for it, but I'm finding HaLRGB to be quite frustrating - takes ages to process to get the balance right, and even then it seems to be a compromise between the detail of the Ha and the colours of the RGB, and all too often, it comes out like a big red smudge. I've got a Pacman in processing that might just end up left on the cutting room floor. It seems I've finally tamed my collimation and coma demons, but on this occasion, my guiding was surprisingly shocking. I normally get something like 0.45" rms error, but this time was as much as 2.5". We'd had near-gales the few days before I took this, and while it was calm at ground level on the nights I was capturing, I guess it was still hurtling around in the upper atmosphere - pretty twinkling stars, and a rather less pretty guide star bouncing around all over the place in PHD. I had to throw away nearly half of my OIII because the stars were too fat, as you can tell from the capture details above. Just for a laugh, here is my first attempt, taken 6 years ago with an unmodded DSLR - a shamefully small set of data (ahem, 13x10s !) and processed within an inch of its life (I think this was about the 4th reprocess), but not a bad attempt I suppose. Anyway, hope you enjoy, comments and cc welcome ! Cheers, Stuart
  16. So I know Orion has been down now for a while, but I just wanted to share this one. For me, it was a literal labour of love. Orion took on a more personal meaning for me at the tale end of last year, much more than just a target in the night sky. I won't bore you all with details, other than it was all very Romeo and Juliet. Anyway, the one night we went for a drive the other side of Hereford (this was mid February), took a firepit, hot chocolate, jacket potatoes and some very warm coats! It was a blustery night, the intervalometer was acting up and Orion was still in Hereford's light dome kinda. But, still managed to get some images with the 18-55 kit lens on the trusty Nikon 5300 despite all of that. Had all but given up on the stacking and processing 2 months later but decided to run it thru Sequator as DSS wasn't working for me. Was 2am, I was dead tired from work and my good old thyroid in full on flare. Happened to yawn, rub my eyes and momentarily refocus them on the laptop screen...to realise I could just very faintly make out Barnard's Loop. Spent the next couple of days rerunning the stack thru Sequator with different parameters to finally produce the attached image. It's messy, it's noisy as hell, it's nowhere near technically correct, but for ME it's a very bittersweet image (two days later Romeo and Juliet parted ways) and a reminder of what happy is. Anyway, I just wanted to share it.
  17. This is a very wide angle image of the Night Sky looking east toward Norwich (hence the orange glow) Unfortunately i forgot to take it in RAW so there is a bit of noise evident I used the wide end of a Sigma 10-20mm EX lens on a Canon EOS 60D
  18. Congrats Olly and Tom for this stunning image of Orion region with more than 400h exposure!!! Awarded by today's EAPOD
  19. Hello all, I'm starting a new thread for this since the hydrogen data is rather old and it has been reprocessed since I posted a while ago. Now I finished the acquisition of O[III] too. Or sort of, I planned more, but clear nights were so rare that I decided to process what I had. The image was done in "3 pass" data over the area. That means that I acquired 3 sets of images covering the same area and combined in the end. First 2 in hydrogen, the last in oxygen. First set consisted of 3 panels in portrait mode for the top area and then I wanted to extend them to the bottom so I shot another 2 panels in landscape mode. I knew that I could get a higher SNR so I shot 4 more panels in landscape mode. Each panel consists of 30-31 subs, each sub 300s. Then I started the acquisition of O[III] which needed light pollution and moonlight conditions than the Ha required. Top panels contain 30 subs, but the bottom ones, only 20-22. Each 300s. Luckily there's not much oxygen in that area so I could get away with less subs. I also took some 10s-30s frames for M42's core. For the framing, I created a quick mosaic of the same area. For the final alignment I shot an image somewhere close to the center of this area. I can't remember if the initial register was done in APP or Registar - for the first pass, but for the next ones it was done in Registar. I removed the gradient manually in each stack with APP and then I created the mosaics for each pass same with APP. The 2 Ha passes I then blended manually 50%-50%. For the processing, I tried to stretch both Ha and O[III] to the same levels and I combined them manually in some 60-40/70-30 ratio for a layer which I used as lum. The colours were Ha - reddish, O[III] - cyan-blue. I spent a lot of time trying to control the big stars, the O[III] filter has poor coatings and, together with the ASI1600s non AR coated sensor, I had much brighter reflections than with the Ha filter. And I tried to raise the oxygen levels selectively around the flame and NGC2023, but the flame is really dim in O[III]. Don't know what other details in the story I forgot, this project drained me a lot of energy. Camera was ASI1600MMC, cooled to -15C for the first pass and to -25C for the ones following. Gain 139. Canon 300 F4 L IS lens with a lot of aberrations towards the edges. AZ-EQ5 mount guided with a 200mm lens and an ASI120MM, with varying seeing. 1.5-2.5" RMS guiding error usually. APT for capture, PHD2 for guiding, Registar for each night initial alignment. DSS, APP, Registar, StarTools, GIMP for processing. I started shooting early in October and I wanted much more, but Orion already becomes less and less visible from where I image and hides beyond the house. Ah, yes, I image from a yellow-pink light polluted area. Thanks for reading, thanks for looking! Comments and suggestions are appreciated. Links to original image and acquisition details: https://drive.google.com/open?id=17tr8lqagQAJg8maojtHZPbM-f67gSBTv https://drive.google.com/open?id=12gjGEgeR7FxR1Tow0e64JczeeUIqKojK https://www.astrobin.com/330284/ Alex
  20. 9th/10th November 2015 Equipment: 80x500mm refractor Time: 22:46 - 00:40 47 Tucanae: showed a fuzzy patch with a distinctly denser/brighter core through a 40mm eyepiece (13X magnified). The 11mm (45X) eyepiece started to show granulation through out the globular cluster. The view was quite faint but noticeable and distinct. The very obviously brighter core gradually became fainter and more disperse toward the edges of the globular disc. The edges were noticibly irregular. NGC265 in Hydrus, dense star field just above beta Hydrus near east of 47 Tucanae. Heaps of faint stars but no nebulosity. The orange star that reminded me of the Sagittarius supernova during last binocular observation is in constellation Reticulum, quite possibly alpha reticulum, right place and brightness, note that gamma reticulum seems orange on star maps. Cluster in Sirius that I spotted last time I was observing is M41. A open cluster of stars, quite sparse and spread out cluster. Easily visible in binoculars and the 80mm refractor. The Pleiades are looking awesome as usual, about a hundred stars visible, and the whole constellation visible in the 40mm eyepiece FOV. This is one object that I usually spend a fair bit of time observing. This view is one that needs the least possible magnification with the highest possible light gathering power, so the 80mm scope at 13X through the 40mm eyepiece is ideal... Atleast in my tool box. Orion Nebula shows the whole Orion's sword in the 40mm eyepiece at 13X. This is definitely a view worth spending a bit of time observing. The running man nebula is very faintly showing through, but not anywhere near as obvious as the Orion Nebula. Increasing the power to 45X with the 11mm TV Nagler reveals more nebulosity and the trapezium is very obvious. Filters: Celestron OIII and Lumicon UHC filters seem to cut away too much light in the 80mm scope. There is more contrast through both but I preferred the view without either filter. The Celestron UHC/LPR and Seben CLR filters did a better job in showing more nebulosity as well as increasing the contrast. Both had their advantages so it's hard to say which did a better job, but if I had to choose, I'd say the UHC/LPR had slightly the edge on the darker parts of the nebula. The OIII and UHC filters are both too aggressive for the 80mm. Equipment: NexStar 8SE Time: 02:00 - 03:40 From approximately 2am, when the 80mm frac was setup to image the Orion's Sword, I wanted to compare the view in the 8SE to the 80mm refractor. First I framed up on to the Orion Nebula, without the UHC filter the nebula glow was very obvious and the stars with in and around, such as the trapezium, were bright. Looking through the 40mm and 11mm eyepieces with and without the UHC filter, the nebulosity was quite obvious, the "moustache" and the fishes mouth were obvious with detail visible that was not visible in the refractor as expected. That said I do remember a more detailed view of the Orion Nebula in the past... Especially using the UHC filter. The second object I located was the globular 47Tucanae. In the 40mm eyepiece the globular did not look any better than in the refractor so I replaced the eye piece to the 11mm Nagler. In the Nagler the globular was still quite dim but I did start to see granulation within the globular, but I was expecting to see the globular as a brighter object than what I'm seeing. I put the reason to seeing such dim views in the globular and the Orion Nebula to the fact that I had to keep adjusting the autoguide star on the laptop screen, even though the screen was turned down to minimum, I figured that the white light was still bright enough to ruin my night adaption.... Then I thought, have a look at the corrector plate... Sure enough, nearly totally covered in dew. Oh well the observing part of the night is over, next time I'll have to run a RCA cable from the CGEM dew strap controller to the 8SE on alt-az mount and try these objects again. Hopefully in the next week there will be at least one more clear night before the moon lights things up again. MG
  21. This is the result of a stack of images of the core of M42 that I took in February. I'm a new to DSO AP and not experienced at all! I have tried to do all sorts of things with the resulting tiff file from DSS (10 x 30 sec lights + 10 x 30 sec Darks + 5 Bias frames using an unmodified Nikon D7200 at ISO 800 on a Starwave ED80). I'm now being patient and slow and followed a PI workflow and I did a little PS to further reduce noise. Thought I'd risk showing it and hope someone can comment on how to improve my new technique in the future. Thanks for looking, R:)
  22. I found a used Deep Space Explorer 8" for sale online. It comes with a collimator and several lenses, as well as a telrad finder scope. The price is lower than any Dobsonion I've seen before, $75. I am just getting started in the stargazing hobby, especially with telescopes, so I was wondering the opinion of you kind folks. Would this be worth buying? Why or why not? Thank you!
  23. Galaxy NGC 4945 in Centaurus Details: Galaxy NGC 4945 in Centaurus 19 May 2018 Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7\ Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) image Plate Solver script version 5.0 =========== Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Rotation .......... North is up Focal ............. 1375.43 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 43' 27.2" x 28' 54.2" Image center ...... RA: 13 04 51.790 Dec: -49 30 37.17 ========== Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 19 May 2018 ): 10 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/2th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 41 x 240sec + ~8 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 10 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  24. Update 16th June: I could not wait to tell people that I was just notified that my image of Omega Centauri will be published as a future NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day ( APOD ) - my first ever I will update the thread when they publish. ................................. A deep look at Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) This image is an attempt to look deeply into the the Omega Centauri globular cluster by using HDR techniques to record as many faint stars as I can whilst retaining colour and detail in the bright stars, including at the core ... ............. Reprocessed to bring out more faint stars and to produce a smother transition between brightness levels. New version ( 12 June 2017 ): Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see lager and sharper ) .......... Old version: Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see full size and sharper ) Image details: from www.nova.astrometry.net: Size: 58.6 x 39 arcmins, Centre: 13h 26 min 50.4 sec, -47deg 28' 39.1''. Orientation: up is -89.9 East of North ( ie. E^ N> ). Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). No filter Long Exposure noise reduction off Location:. Blue Mountains, Australia. Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture: 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing:. Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 9 sets. HDR combination. Pixinsight May 2017
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