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steppenwolf

The Orion Nebula - a different processing technique!

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steppenwolf    4,633

This cross-stitch is now almost complete so I thought you might like to see an update. The full cross stitch is completely circular but this photograph has been cropped slightly for another purpose.

stitched_at_the_eyepiece.thumb.png.97b9df7e7dded44e38b14eafbd10c69f.png

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swag72    5,696

WOW!!! There's really  nothing else that can be said for it's sheer quality and the amount of work that Jane must have put into it...... it is FANTASTIC!! Please pass my biggest respect onto Jane for her work :)

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AndyUK    593

An incredible piece of work...  I dread to think how many hours have gone into this!   I'm sure I'd go cross-eyed within 20 minutes...

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tooth_dr    1,265

Wonderful. What a talent! Thanks for sharing. 

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DaveS    2,705

That is astonishing!

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Stub Mandrel    6,364

Belongs in a museum collection as a unique example of the craft!

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Xiga    392

I can spot a bit of vertical banding :tongue:

No easy fix springs to mind, but working in Layers is definitely not recommended, lol.

All joking aside, this is seriously impressive. Hat, tipped. 

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wimvb    2,208

Excellent masterpiece by the Lady with the Sharp Needle.

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MARS1960    1,129

That was well worth the wait, it is utterly stunning, brilliant work.

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Demonperformer    987

Indeed, very impressive.

Now, if you were to spend as many hours collecting data as she has spent producing this ...

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    • By David_L
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