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MARS1960

Advanced Members
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About MARS1960

  • Rank
    Proto Star
  • Birthday 29/10/60

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Photography, astrophotography, fast cars, (my Supercharged Aston Martin V8 Vantage roadster) reading, films.
  • Location
    Norfolk

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. Andy, why sacrifice image quality by using the diagonal? would it not be better to achieve balance without the diagonal, image quality is greatly improved.
  2. I may be missing the obvious but why can't you just screw your Hyperion eyepiece into the camera and then slot it into the scope/reducer.
  3. Thanks Sean. I used my Modded 600D and a CGEM mount.
  4. Thanks guys, appreciate the kind words.
  5. Finally got a bit time of out with my new 120ED. I managed only 12 x 240s @ ISO1600 before clouds rolled in, so just 48mins intergration time. A quick mess around in PI as it wasn't worth spending hours on it till i have more data. I also observed some great views of Jupiter with my SW 22mm and 2 x ED Barlow I think i'm going to like this scope, could finally have found a keeper.
  6. I'll take your word for it Dave .
  7. Bummer. I have a 10 year old samsung 17" i5 for outside, i certainly wouldn't dream of taking the Dell out, IMO it's best to have one for outside, one for inside, unless your an armchair Aper.
  8. I bought this for processing, it's darn fast and copes with whatever i throw at it. http://www.dell.com/uk/p/xps-15-9560-laptop/pd?oc=cnx95606&model_id=xps-15-9560-laptop
  9. Exactly and it also helps keep dust off the sensor datalord.
  10. Lol, thank you Paddy, for some reason it just seems more real now, but i am a bit weird anyway .
  11. That is absolutely fantastic Paddy, the best i have ever seen. BUT, i'm going to be very brave and say it, i wish the ratio of sky to galaxy was larger if you get what i mean.
  12. The full moon is a killer, i'm lucky if i can go above ISO 100 and even at that i'm hard pressed to get even a 4 min sub and that is with a good quality LP filter. When there is no moon however and i use the ASP-C equivalent of this, it works brilliantly. http://www.365astronomy.com/Astronomik-EOS-XL-CLS-Visual-Clip-Filter-for-Canon-FULL-FRAME-Cameras.html
  13. Ok, i see your point, you can train with any camera providing the software is adequate, a free trial of BYEOS should do the job, substitute the eyepiece for your camera and use BYEOS, hope this helps. Training. During this phase you use the control panel or menus to say "Hey! Pay attention to this!" to the mount, then you manually keep a star perfectly centred for several worm periods. You do this by centering a star with a high-magnification eyepiece that includes a cross-hair reticle. You then stare at the star for 10 to 15 minutes and use the mount's hand controller to manually make the small adjustments necessary to keep it perfectly centred on the cross hair. The mount records the error corrections you supply, remembering where in the worm position each one was needed. By training through more than one worm cycle, the mount can record an average correction, in case you reacted slowly or over-reacted. Playback. Once you have trained the mount, you can turn on PEC. The mount will "play back" the recorded error correction information by slightly changing the speed of the Right Ascension drive to move ahead or back each time your manual error corrections did the same. This will cancel the periodic error, resulting in a smoother track. Training. During this phase you use the control panel or menus to say "Hey! Pay attention to this!" to the mount, then you manually keep a star perfectly centred for several worm periods. You do this by centering a star with a high-magnification eyepiece that includes a cross-hair reticle. You then stare at the star for 10 to 15 minutes and use the mount's hand controller to manually make the small adjustments necessary to keep it perfectly centred on the cross hair. The mount records the error corrections you supply, remembering where in the worm position each one was needed. By training through more than one worm cycle, the mount can record an average correction, in case you reacted slowly or over-reacted. Playback. Once you have trained the mount, you can turn on PEC. The mount will "play back" the recorded error correction information by slightly changing the speed of the Right Ascension drive to move ahead or back each time your manual error corrections did the same. This will cancel the periodic error, resulting in a smoother track.
  14. I'm new to this but are you sure you have good balance? a (good) AVX mount shouldn't do that, even my 10 year old CG5 GT would do 2min subs all night with maybe half a dozen throw aways.