Jump to content

stargazine_ep46_banner.thumb.jpg.34e6cdd5a0856b006a0b47c6373eb9b1.jpg

Is there anything that can be done to stop this Starlink satellite project?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 25
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Hi folks,   I witnessed the Starlink satellites fly over London last night. It’s so unfair. Who gives them the right to ruin our night sky.   Is there anything that can be done to stop

Even if every stargazer in the UK signed the petition it would make NO difference. Space X answers to US agencies not online petitions and there is alot of money to be made. It will also push advances

This must be stopped. A private corporation for their own profit is destroying astronomy and polluting the night sky which belongs to everyone. This must end right now. How can this be, please do cont

13 minutes ago, pblackwell said:

Hi folks,

 

 

 

I witnessed the Starlink satellites fly over London last night. It’s so unfair. Who gives them the right to ruin our night sky.

 

 

 

Is there anything that can be done to stop this?

 

 

 

Paul

 

Not overly happy about it myself, a view shared by plenty of other I’m sure. I doubt there is very much that can be done to be honest. I’m hoping that they will be less obvious once in their final orbits but am not convinced.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

This must be stopped. A private corporation for their own profit is destroying astronomy and polluting the night sky which belongs to everyone. This must end right now. How can this be, please do contact newspapers and show them the videos how would the sky look like when all the satellites would be put on the orbit. It is literally a catastrophe.

What they are doing is illegal.

 

Edited by runway77
  • Like 3
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I recognise the sentiment, we'll have to wait until they are in their final orbits to really get an idea of the brightness of these satellites. They are in low-Earth orbit, so in theory they should only be visible after sunset or before sunrise (except perhaps maybe in the Summer). The first batch of satellites was invisible to the naked eye quite soon.

There is one Starlink satellite in orbit that has a coating to reduce its brightness (dubbed 'Darksat'). It's just a reduction of about a magnitude if I recall correctly.

No, we can't do much if 'the world' wants fast internet access everywhere and lives in large cities without any noticable night sky. But we can express our concerns, and do what we always do: create awareness and tell people about the wonders of the night sky.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The project has been running since 2015 with the permissions being considered in 2017 and approved towards the end of that year. Worldwide astronomy organisations did raise concerns at the time but the decision was still to go ahead. I believe the project gathered additional impetus when the US military took an interest in it.

By all means sign the petitions etc but in all honesty I don't see any chance whatsoever in stopping this programme now.

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, John said:

The project has been running since 2015 with the permissions being considered in 2017 and approved towards the end of that year. Worldwide astronomy organisations did raise concerns at the time but the decision was still to go ahead. I believe the project gathered additional impetus when the US military took an interest in it.

By all means sign the petitions etc but in all honesty I don't see any chance whatsoever in stopping this programme now.

If like what I saw last night then this is truely  awful and I dread to think what it will be like with 12,000+ of them constantly orbiting 😔

Edited by pblackwell
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

wait till they start failing and a new load get thrown up there, no doubt the old junk will be left floating around and still messing up the views. Surprised NASA and others haven't stepped in as they must reach a point where launching anything to head out of earth orbit will be running even more of a gauntlet of space garbage.

It's a kinda pointless thing to be doing really too. There's only so many areas where internet via satellite is really worth putting into place surely? Most developed regions already have infrastructure that would be far better and more reliable so it only really serves for really remote/under-developed regions. So why not just put a few geo-stationary units up there like they have for telecoms and TV rather than litter the entire sky?

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, John said:

The project has been running since 2015 with the permissions being considered in 2017 and approved towards the end of that year. Worldwide astronomy organisations did raise concerns at the time but the decision was still to go ahead. I believe the project gathered additional impetus when the US military took an interest in it.

By all means sign the petitions etc but in all honesty I don't see any chance whatsoever in stopping this programme now.

I agree with this entirely.

I also thing it is likely that the youtube videos are not based on any actual data so could be very inaccurate.

If they are low earth orbit then like others have said they will have virtually no impact in proper astronomical dark.

Dont get me wrong, I really dont like them and if I thought I could do anything to stop them, I would.

I really hope their impact is minimal

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The weather forecaster tonight on BBC South even suggested people should look up tonight at around 10pm to see the spectacular display of satellites passing over.  Great! People are going to start liking these monstrous things. More! More! More!  😪

Edited by Ouroboros
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, miguel87 said:

if I thought I could do anything to stop them, I would.

 

well with not many planes flying at the moment... anyone got a decent carbon laser handy... ;) 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sadly, I think that 99% of the public couldn't care less about the skies becoming more cluttered, and even embrace it.

On my village community Facebook page (very busy with the lockdown), someone has excitedly posted updates on viewing them and loads of locals are out watching them. No interest in protecting our natural environment whatsoever, and we should consider the skies above our heads as an integral part of the wider natural environment.

Edited by lukebl
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, lukebl said:

Sadly, I think that 99% of the public couldn't care less about the skies becoming more cluttered, and even embrace it.

On my village community Facebook page (very busy with the lockdown), someone has excitedly posted updates on viewing them and loads of locals are out watching them. No interest in protecting our natural environment whatsoever. 

I was thinking something similar but regarding LP last night.

In a way I am quite lucky and live on the very outskirts of our town, with a long rear garden with really very little else at the rear but still on an estate. Most neighbours have rear flood lights that come on and off but next door but one has upgraded theirs to what must be 1KW of lighting, maybe it is only 500W but it is like daylight for almost as far as you can see when it comes on (and that's whenever a cat goes past). I was just wondering what makes anyone need to make it daylight again in the wee hours of the night. I do have a rear light that I can permanently turn off when imaging but it is 20W led and illuminates my 50M long garden amply to see what I am doing.

For domestic use I just wish there was a limit on the wattage of these things at least. Mind you somebody would then just put more than one of them up.

Steve

Edited by teoria_del_big_bang
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. So sad to read about this. As usual it's all about money, so nothing will stop them all going up. I hate humanity at times. Lord help the rest of the solar system, and beyond, if we manage to venture outwards in the future seeing as we pollute and destroy everything we come across. Seems like my new hobby will be very short lived.... :(

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

99% of the public don't even look at the nightsky so wouldn't care one bit if it was full of satalites. When all 12,000 or even 42,000 which is the ultimate goal are in orbit that will be the end of astronomy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 20/04/2020 at 20:40, DaveL59 said:

wait till they start failing and a new load get thrown up there, no doubt the old junk will be left floating around and still messing up the views. Surprised NASA and others haven't stepped in as they must reach a point where launching anything to head out of earth orbit will be running even more of a gauntlet of space garbage.

It's a kinda pointless thing to be doing really too. There's only so many areas where internet via satellite is really worth putting into place surely? Most developed regions already have infrastructure that would be far better and more reliable so it only really serves for really remote/under-developed regions. So why not just put a few geo-stationary units up there like they have for telecoms and TV rather than litter the entire sky?

Failed satellites will deorbit automatically.


It's not pointless, it will give people who either don't have internet or who has crappy internet service like from geostationary satellites the possibility to get fast internet with low ping times.
Internet from geostationary satellites usually has a ping of 500-1500ms, browsing on it is a bad experience because of the slow response, the slowness is caused by their large distance from the earth.
Starlink will have a low ping time of around 10-20ms from what i've read, this will of course rise with distance like with regular internet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Xplode said:

Failed satellites will deorbit automatically.


It's not pointless, it will give people who either don't have internet or who has crappy internet service like from geostationary satellites the possibility to get fast internet with low ping times.
Internet from geostationary satellites usually has a ping of 500-1500ms, browsing on it is a bad experience because of the slow response, the slowness is caused by their large distance from the earth.
Starlink will have a low ping time of around 10-20ms from what i've read, this will of course rise with distance like with regular internet.

And at the same time it will turn the planet into some kind of Coruscant. Insane project.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.