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lukebl

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lukebl last won the day on December 29 2017

lukebl had the most liked content!

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About lukebl

  • Rank
    Red Dwarf

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Norfolk Astronomer, bread-maker, bug and wine enthusiast. Come to Attleborough. At least it's not Watton.
  • Location
    Central Norfolk-ish somewhere, UK, 52°N 1°E ish
  1. Stunning. I've seen noctilucent clouds and they are spooky, but these days I just can't stay up late enough to see them!
  2. Nor me. I don't even do astronomy groups. Apart from this one. Something I've learnt is to embrace my innate introversion, and look on it as a positive and constructive thing. I'm now very comfortable in my own skin.
  3. lukebl

    It's Asteroid Day

    Has anyone noticed that today is Asteroid Day, on the 110th anniversary of the Tunguska event. Get out there and look at some asteroids!
  4. Hi folks, I thought I'd try a bit of lunar imaging this evening with my QHY IMG132e colour cam. It seems to work fine, managing about 20 fps at full-frame for a while, then suddenly plummets to 0.2 fps. Even if I change the ROI to something really small, like 400 x 400 pixels, it does the same. Why would this happen?
  5. lukebl

    A Sad Find

    Me and my first telescope, c. 1968!
  6. lukebl

    First mars image!

    Ha ha. Nice try.
  7. I haven't done any planetary imaging for ages (they're too low anyway), but here's a quick wide field view of Jupiter from last night. 1000 frames. 250mm f/4.8 Newtonian, QHY IMG132e cam, no barlow. Satellites from left to right: Callisto, Europa, Io, and Ganymede.
  8. lukebl

    Never owned a Newt.

    As has been said, 2k is a lot for a newt. Personally, if I had that sort of budget I'd stick with your current gear for imaging, and get a big 18" dobsonian like the Stargate 450p. It's collapsible so relatively easy to transport. A bit more than your budget new, but the things you'll see with that aperture.....
  9. If that was one of the stacked images, I rescaled it in Registax by 200%. So the size in arcmin will be the same, but the Pixel Scale will be double.
  10. No focal reducer. Not really needed as it's a Newt, not a Cass. I'm not sure of the status of the frame integration. Need a bit more practice.
  11. Hi folks, This is meant as a quick preliminary review of the RunCam Night Eagle Astro video camera, which I've acquired from the USA courtesy of Furrysocks2, with the intention of using it for asteroidal occultation measurements. It was originally developed for night time drone flying, and having a very sensitive sensor someone from the astronomy field noticed and the result is this slightly modified version. IOTA (International Occultation Timing Association) are suggesting that it can be used for occultations. It captures at a rate of 25 fps. The sensor is only 720 x 576 pixels, so you won't get high-quality images, but it's good for real live viewing. I used it with my 250mm f/4.7 Newtonian. I also bought a GPS Video time inserter for accurate occultation measurements. Here's some preliminary results. Being June, it doesn't get really dark and I don't like staying up late, but I made an exception yesterday! Firstly, it's absolutely TINY. Like a toy from a Christmas Cracker. Here it is next to Lego Chewbacca. I tried it on M57, The Ring Nebula. This is an animated GIF to show roughly what the live view looks like. When you consider these are just 1/25 second exposures from what looks like a cracker toy, it's quite remarkable. The brighter star on the left-hand side is about 10th magnitude, and stars down to 14th magnitude are also clearly visible when you stretch the image. I have an occultation of a 10th magnitude star next week, so this looks promising. This is a stack of 200 x 1/25 sec frames in Registax. OK, it's not going to win any prizes, but the depth is good, and the central star is visible. This is a single frame of M13 And a stack of 200 frames. Not so good as a single frame. So, a potentially interesting and affordable piece of kit (c £100 including shipping and taxes) for certain aspects of our hobby.
  12. lukebl

    Pedants' corner

    I regularly lounge. Usually with a glass of Shiraz.
  13. lukebl

    Alan Bean, 4th man on the Moon dies

    Who can name the remining 4? Here they are: Buzz Aldrin (88). David Scott (85), Charlie Duke (82) and Jack Schmitt (82)
  14. lukebl

    Pic du Midi Observatory, Pyrenees

    Sorry, I didn't mean to rude about it! It is a magnificent place, and I'm sure a night-time visit would be completely different. Just noting that it is very busy during the day with 'ordinary' folk!
  15. lukebl

    Asteroid 2010 WC9 close approach

    True, it's moving quite slowly now, but at closest approach it'll be travelling at 12 degrees per hour and out of view in the southern hemisphere!
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