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assasincz

Baader Hyperion Zoom Mk.III

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OK, as soon as I posted this I plucked up the courage and twisted something and the whole top bit came off, I can see where it would go now, gaaah.

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It's not obvious! Neither is swapping between the 2" and 1.25" nosepieces ;)

Sent from my GT-N7105 using Tapatalk

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Awesome review. Certainly got me thinking........ And saving!

Sent from my SGP321 using Tapatalk

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It's a great bit of kit, even more so when coupled with the zoom barlow. My only slight gripe is that for someone like myself who's just starting out some sort of instructions, or guide to what the numerous extra bits in the box are, would certainly have helped.

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The combined zoom and barlow deal, if you can still find it, is well worth it.

The barlow just threads into other eyepieces as well, so is very versatile. It's of very good optical quality...I am not a big fan of barlows normally but this one does what it's supposed to without degrading the image.

The only other consideration is your focal length of the scope: for short fl scopes the barlow is perfect, as it will give you access to much higher powers than without or with better eye relief than for instance a 4mm plossl or ortho. 

If you scope has a long fl however, like an SCT, Mak or long refractor, you might just not need the barlow to get the high mags you need...for example in my F15 refractor an 8.5mm ep gives x225 which is a high power, and barlowing it to double that would rarely if ever be useable..

HTH

Dave

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Thanks for this great review assasincz.

I bought mine some eight months ago and am very happy with it.

One additional drawback I find though, is that when assembled to my GSO RC8, focus

needs a tube extension which contributes mechanical instabilities to the OTA and

may cause some pretty high sensitivity to winds (in open field).

Other than this, it it a lovely component.

Romi

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After a lot of agonizing over how to upgrade my stock eyepieces for Skymax 127 I opted for Hyperion Zoom. Clouds are bound to clear in the next day or two. Looks nice and hefty.

Bought it with Teleskop Austria, their price is really alright, 215 euros...

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And some first impressions...am not sure that the declared FOV is the real one...or I might give up on twisting up the eyecup up...

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Also, I remember seeing a thread on cloudy nights about FOV being less than advertised, and it is correct. Compared it with stock EPs and it is apparent that 24mm starts at around 40 deg, and not at 50 deg as promoted.

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And some first impressions...am not sure that the declared FOV is the real one...or I might give up on twisting up the eyecup up...

As you have seen, the Hyperion Zoom has an AFoV at the 24mm end of around 42 degrees but you do get nearly 70 degrees at 8mm. Personally I treated it as a 20mm - 8mm zoom when I had one.

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As you have seen, the Hyperion Zoom has an AFoV at the 24mm end of around 42 degrees but you do get nearly 70 degrees at 8mm. Personally I treated it as a 20mm - 8mm zoom when I had one.

Spot on. Checked with my other EPs and that is it.

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You guys are going to make my wife cry, every night when we have had rain I have a read here and spend more money. Being a novice at having a big Newtonian 200pds after keeping myself in check with a small cheap refractor in a month I have bought a new scope, mount and eyepeices. I am now looking at this as an option as the guy I bought my mount off praised this optic no end and his collection of scopes and astrographs made me seek out better eps etc.

Tonight as the sky deposits more rain this thread is reinforcing my want of decent eps and a zoom would be lovely as it will save faffing around in the dark churchyard which has become our astrodome. When the local constabulary don't annoy us asking why we're there, and I respond astronomy homework sir, as my 14yr old son is viewing for his course work project.

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As a temporary measure until we can stump up the dosh for one of theses I have bought a cheap 1.25 zoom as we have so much in our wish list that unless I can find a reasonably cheap second hand oneit will have to wait a few months. However having played with one on a night with others looking at the lovely dark skies this weekend its still on my list of really desperate wants. Why oh why do I live in Sussex where the bonfire season is 3months long tonights been ruined by the light of yet another bonfire societies festivities yesterday I had to go 20miles in search of a clean sky.

Geoff

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Finally had a proper night to put the zoom to work. Here are some thoughts.

First, it is great for star alignment on the GoTo, as it allows zeroing and then defocusing for the maximum precision. This is true even though by using it i sacrifice about 10 deg off my plossl and about 16 deg off my ES 24mm piece.

Very convenient for watching Moon and planets and trying to figure out the proper magnification as the seeing deteriorates or improves during the course of the night.

Unlike ES 24mm, it is a bit clunky getting it past my Lacerta diaelectric diagonal, i always have to give it some extra push.

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This looks promising.. what i like about the zoom approach is that it is easier to frame a pic doing AP. And as i only have two good eyepiecese so far ( doing mosty AP so far), i guess i'll bite the bullet and spend the cash...

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OK... did it. I will post a few comparison pictures when they arrive.

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Hi everyone ... I find this Review awesome assasincz  .

I just bought a SkyWatcher 127mm Maksutov Telescope  and I'm aiming to purchase the  Baader Hyperion Zoom Mark III, 8-24mm eyepiece .

I would like to know if its worth buying the Baader Hyperion Zoom Mark III, 8-24mm eyepiece or individual Baader Hyperion Eyepieces ?

Is the End result in IMAGE QUALITY the same in between the Baader Hyperion Zoom Mark III, 8-24mm eyepiece and individual Baader Hyperion Eyepieces ?

Does the Baader Hyperion Zoom Mark III, 8-24mm eyepiece works great with Maksutov Cassegrain Telescopes ?

Please , I would really appreciate to have your opinions and share your experiences from those who are using or used it on a Maksutov Cassegrain Telescope .

Thank You .

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