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Found 9 results

  1. I'm trying to take pics with my Pentax camera and have a "C" mount and a 40mm extension tube........what else do I need for to take photos with this lens? Relatively new to all of this. Thanks for any replies
  2. Due to an upgrade it's time to put my Hyperion 8mm eyepiece up for sale. It's in great condition and comes with both end caps, leather pouch and original box. The box is slightly damaged as you can see in the photo, but the eyepiece was kept in a case. Comes with both 14 and 28mm tuning rings, meaning you can also use this eyepiece as 6, 5 or 4.3mm eyepiece. I'm asking £60. Ideally cash and collection from Derby/ Notts area, happy to meet up locally, but could post for an extra £5 and paypal friends and family. Thanks for looking. Please note this item is listed elsewhere.
  3. Hello people, First of all I'm kind of new around here, so be gentle... I've recently bought a sky-watcher 150P DS on an HEQ5 Pro with the future intention to buy coma corrector and guiding system to image with this setup however, for the time being since I've burnt my bank account almost to the ground with scope and mount I'm sticking to visual observations. Having said that, the scope came with a 28mm (2'') eyepice and it's fairly nice to look through, so I'm not thinking of upgrading that for now. I do intend to buy a shorter focal length eyepiece (around 8 or 9mm) and a 2x or 2,5x Barlow. Since I don't have much funding straight away I was looking at cheaper new eyepices as well as used ones and found a used Baader Hyperion 8mm for about the same price tag as the Celestron X-Cel LX 9mm new. And wanted to know if the Hyperion used is a good investment or if I should go with the new Celestron eyepiece. Thanks a lot, your help is greatly appreciated...
  4. I have had my Hyperion Zoom Mk.III for quite a while now and I was wondering, if I should review it here, because what there is to say about an eyepiece, really? You just shove it into your focuser and look down the glass end, right? Well, since the Hyperion Zoom is effectively 5 eyepieces in 1 (I don’t really think it’s that big of a deal), it is not really a “static” piece of equipment, and there is lot of “accessory” for it, I thought I’d give it a try. Optics Optically, the eyepiece is a “seven element eyepiece, with multi-coated optics for remarkable sharpness, contrast and colour correction.” I am in no way an expert in optics, but I have to say that the quality of the image outperforms my pervious eyepieces, primarily in sharpness and contrast. I even had a 12mm Hyperion normal eyepiece for some time, and when compared, the views through the two were pretty much the same. Even in my F/5 dobsonian, the image distortion at the edge of the field of view is really not bad - though there, I do not really notice it that much; it is only when I zoom out to 24mm focal length that the distortions become really noticeable. There is a shaft, sticking out of the body of the eyepiece, in which the movable part of the zoom mechanism moves in and out, and I simply never get tired of the action-packed zoom action. One problem can arise though, and that is that any imperfections on the surface of the lenses inside the eyepiece can get, due to its zoom nature, visible at some point - that way, I once noticed a quite large piece of dirt inside the optics, which came into focus in 12mm position - this was really bothering me, because it was extremely disturbing, especially when observing the Sun or the Moon. Luckily, somehow, the piece of dirt disappeared (after bumping the EP gently on the table), so there is no need for returning it to the supplier. The piece of dirt did not appear again ever since. It is said that normal eyepieces outperform zoom eyepieces, but I am not so sure. Well, on one hand, you get a narrower field of view, that is true, but the quality of the image delivered (with Hyperion Zoom in particular) is really very good and if you are not traditionalist, or fond of ultra-wide fields of view, this age-old paradigm suddenly gets null and void and a concept of having half a dozen eyepieces suddenly gets, well, stupid. Having one decent Zoom eyepiece just seems more practical. Personally, since I have bought my Hyperion Zoom, I have not felt any need of buying a new eyepiece (for the particular range of magnifications), because it embodies everything I do (and will) need at the moment. Furthermore, the edges of the lenses are apparently blackened, and the EP’s construction allows very little or practically no reflections of brighter objects. Accessory The Hyperion Zoom comes with a wide range of “accessory”, if that is the right word; basically you get two different rubber eye cups (I even got a rubber eye shield, but I am not sure if that was part of the package, or a gift from the supplier), and both allow you to use the eyepiece comfortably, even when you are a glasses wearer; the eye relief is generous enough to allow that, though I am sure there are EPs with better eye relief than Hyperion Zoom. Furthermore, you get adapters for both 2” and 1.25” focusers. I personally prefer to use the 2” one with my 300P, because it feels more firm and solid, and the inside of the 2” adapter is “baffled”, which seems nice. One thing that I do not really get is that when you use 2” adapter, you can’t use 1.25” colour filters at the same time. The shaft, in which the movable part of the eyepiece moves in, is of just the right diameter, and it even has a thread on the end of it; but somehow, the boffins at Baader did not think to make it standard 1.25” filter thread, and that is a pity. I think it would be wonderful to have a freedom of filter choice, but that way, you can only use 2” filters with the 2” adapter and 1.25” filters with the 1.25” adapter; too bad. Perhaps, they will address that on Mk.IV. Furthermore, you get a wash of dust covers, just in case you use any of the possible combinations of eye cups and adapters, which means you can easily lose one if you are not careful. The eyepiece also comes with rather elegant leather-ish bag for you to store it in, which I, think is a rather nice touch. Usage The most prominent feature of this Zoom eyepiece is its…well…zoom capability. The eyepiece has click stops at 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 mm focal lengths, which means that it can deliver a wide range of magnifications, depending on your telescope’s focal length. I for instance have a 305/1500 dobsonian, which means that I get 62x, 75x, 94x, 125x and 187x magnifications, which is a range good enough for most objects up there. It should be said that the EP’s field of view varies with focal length - basically, the shorter the focal length, the wider the field of view; the longer the focal length, the narrower the field of view (it’s actually 68° FOV with 8mm and 50° FOV with 24mm). Of course you can use any focal length between the click-stop position as well. Furthermore, though advertised, the eyepiece is not perfectly parfocal (meaning that it holds focus at all focal lengths), which means you have to refocus every time you change the EP’s focal length. I know that there are eyepieces with better FOV that are perfectly parfocal, but these can get way more expensive than the Hyperion Zoom. It is fair to say that I have heard that some people find their zoomy Hyperions stuck when it’s freezing out there, and thus the eyepiece needs regreasing. However, I have used mine in temperature below -7°C all night, and although the zoom action felt more stiff, it did not get stuck even a bit, so if there really is a problem with it freezing solid, I reckon it is an effect prominent overtime. However, the Hyperion Zoom is not that cheap - it costs roughly the same as two fixed focal length Hyperion eyepieces, which is quite a lot, but then, you get a variety of magnifying power in one eyepiece, and it is just great not having to change the eyepieces all the time, every time you want to try different power. One of the best things on this eyepiece comes with it zoom capability - without having to change the eyepieces, you can toy around with magnifications to see which magnification delivers the best contrast on the object you are looking at - this is due to the fact that the contrast of the background often changes with magnification (e.g. when you zoom in, the background gets darker), which means that some dim objects can miraculously pop up, or seem more distinct. There is a slight issue with having to refocus all the time but when you concentrate on some fuzzy blob, you see the change in contrast when you change magnifications, even though the image is not perfectly focused. This gives you an ability of very quickly and easily changing the views through your telescope to see which one fits the situation the best, and I think this is one of the main advantages of any zoom eyepiece. The eyepiece itself is quite bulky and heavy (when compared to standard 1.25” eyepieces), which on its own is ok - you get a good sense of its build quality and heftiness - but it becomes a problem when you want to use the eyepiece with some more basic, entry level telescopes. For instance, I have a Skywatcher 114/900 with a plastic 1.25” rack-and-pinion focuser and it really struggles with the Hyperion Zoom. The eyepiece is so heavy that it bends the focuser tube this way and that way and upsets the balance of the whole setup considerably. This means that perfect collimation, is, at this point, really unimportant. I have yet to try the eyepiece in my Firstscope 76, but I reckon it will handle the eyepiece a bit better, because its focuser feels slightly more robust. Upsides “5-in-1” zoom concept No need for eyepiece swapping Zoom ability lets you find the ideal contrast magnification Decent build-quality, big and robust Wide range of accessory (adaptors, eye cups) Good contrast and sharpness, comparable to fixed focal-length Hyperions Smooth zoom action, even in low temperatures Good eye relief Good for afocal projection No inside reflections Downsides Narrower field of view with low magnifications Inability to use 1.25” filters with 2” adapter More expensive than regular eyepieces Dirt inside the optics can get into focus, which is really annoying Apparently can freeze solid in sub-zero temperatures (not proven) Heavy Not suitable for entry-level telescopes
  5. Hi there, I was about to pull the trigger on a nice Hyperion modular 8mm with both fine tuning rings, to cover the 5ish focal length as well (6-5-4.3mm). Although the reviews are quite good, I'm not so sure that the optical quality with the fine tuning rings will be good. On the other hand, for the same price could acquire something like the 5 and 8 BST Starguiders or similar (any suggestions) So how does the Hyperion modular 8mm compares to the 8mm BST Starguider? How does the 8mm Hyperion finetuned to 5mm compares to the 5mm BST Starguider? Is the view from the 8mm Hyperion with both fine tuning acceptable, good, or bad? Is the view from the 8mm Hyperion without the nosepiece(barlow) at 21.8mm acceptable, good, or bad, or completely distorted as opposed to my 26mm meade super plossl? My scope is a slow 5", F/10 refractor, eyepieces intended for lunar and planetary high-power yielding at 150x(8mm) & 240x(5mm) Your thoughts please... P.S. : The Hyperion finetuned to 6mm covers the gap between 150x-240x with a nice 200x, that's another thing to consider
  6. Hi guys, It has been a while (a couple of months) since I have had my new Baader Hyperion Zoom Mk.III eyepiece but today, when obseving the Sun, I have noticed quite a prominent piece of dirt in the FOV. A bit of investigating later, it seems, that the dirt is stuck somewhere inside the mechanics of the eyepiece, bringing it into focus somewhere between 16mm focal length. Looking through the eyepiece against the bright background, I have notice at least two other smaller pieces of dirt, but the one large in question is the one that is really bugging me. I know there is a way to disassemble the eyepiece and clean it, but I'm positive that cleaning it DIY will only make it worse. My question is - is the piece of dirt reason enough to send it back under the warranty? Thanks
  7. A table of Mount payload ratings and a spreadsheet for Baader Hyperion variations and your Scope & Barlow / PowerMate / Amplifier. Might be of use to a few =) Mount Payloads.xlsx Mount Payloads.csv Baader Hyperion Varsiations.xlsx Baader Hyperion Varsiations a.xls
  8. Todays quick snapshot of the Sun. I waited a long while for a gap in the clouds by which time the Sun was skimming the rooftops which didn't aid the seeing. 66mm ED Apo Baader Solar Film Baader Hyperion Zoom Sigma DP3M Single shot, processed in LR5 / ACDsee Pro 6 / Gimp I now have a simple 52mm - 43mm reducer ring to attach the camera to the Hyperion zoom. Again glimpses of detail but the conditions today were against me
  9. Can anyone confirm do the fine-tuning rings for Baader Hyperion eyepieces work with Baader MPCC for visual use? Are they the same 14 and 28 mm pieces of metal, in short?
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