Jump to content

NLC-Banner.thumb.jpg.acb5ba835b9e8bf0718b90539633017d.jpg

JUPITER & SATURN


DAVE AMENDALL
 Share

Recommended Posts

10 hours ago, DAVE AMENDALL said:

On the evening of the 21st December Jupiter and Saturn will be at their closest for 800 years (only about a 10th of a degree apart. This will not occur again until 2080.  Let's hope it's cloud free in the UK for a change.....Dave

Seems to me that the more momentous the event the more likely it is to cloud over.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couple of poor but real.phone images via my FS128 earlier this evening..I was straining to get a view this early evening, and the different orientations are due to moving the diagonal to get a clearer view..in the 2nd image Jupiter is literally cut in half by the roofline of our house!

John Huntley's very interesting thread in the Planetary Observing forum is well worth a read👍..

Just search for "19th December 16:25 hrs: Jupiter & Saturn 1/4 degree apart" in the forum shown above..

Dave

IMG_20201219_165347688.jpg

IMG_20201219_164934061.jpg

Edited by F15Rules
Additional text info
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Moonshed said:

Funny hobby isn’t it? One minute we are admiring a really splendid image of Andromeda, the next a wobbly, blurred image of a couple of planets, and appreciate them equally.

Yep, I guess it's because the event is something we haven't/can observe in such a long time that makes the wobbly image's significant. The moment of being there and seeing it with our own eye's, a bit like total solar eclipses.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nigella Bryant said:

Yep, I guess it's because the event is something we haven't/can observe in such a long time that makes the wobbly image's significant. The moment of being there and seeing it with our own eye's, a bit like total solar eclipses.

Talking of solar eclipses... I went down to Cornwall in 1999 to watch it and remembered good advice I was given, forget about your camera and instead enjoy the moment! I enjoyed the moment.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Nigella Bryant said:

Yep, I guess it's because the event is something we haven't/can observe in such a long time that makes the wobbly image's significant. The moment of being there and seeing it with our own eye's, a bit like total solar eclipses.

Seeing it with our own eyes, that is what I try to impress to all my friends.

And when it is possibly something that truly will happen only once in a lifetime, then it's even more special to actually witness it yourself!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, Sky-searcher said:

Got a few pics in daylight at 4pm before they disappeared behind the roof top of the house opposite. Easily viewed with 14mm Morpheus & Mak 150 between the clouds. Not a good forecast for tomorrow though.

DC2C479B-A004-4E97-AC3B-29C72B79E425.jpeg

Such luck with weather. Very nice, almost as good as my drawing 🤣

  • Like 4
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Moonshed said:

Funny hobby isn’t it? One minute we are admiring a really splendid image of Andromeda, the next a wobbly, blurred image of a couple of planets, and appreciate them equally.

It’s not the hobby, it’s us 😁

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Dantooine said:

A terrible drawing quickly scribbled on a scrap of paper.. but hey I’ve got to see this in a cloud gap so all is well. 71685350-A0EB-464A-9104-85B82B98AA63.thumb.jpeg.8c972b89cf9594c5b732a11d608de163.jpeg

Love the delicate way you have shaded the Cassini Division!  😂

Edited by Moonshed
Called it Cassini Ring instead of Division
  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, for a wonder the clouds parted at about 5pm on 20th and there they both were. Very low down up here in North Wales and heading for the hilly horizon, but clear to the naked eye.

I quickly hauled my Dob out and had a happy few minutes admiring both planets in one field of view. Good view of the Galilean moons of Jupiter, and I sort of convinced myself I could make out Titan. Visual only, but it was way too low for any astrophotography rig I had to hand. I am looking forward to some splendid images from astronomers luckier and more organised than I am!

Definitely one for the album.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Totally clouded out here in Cornwall, too, with rain expected to last for the next few hours.

Yesterday evening was mostly cloudy, though with a few clear patches overhead - not much good for attempting to view the conjunction just above the horizon. In any case I would have had to set up away from home for an adequately low horizon, and was expecting visitors from 4pm, so I'm afraid I didn't even try! Maybe next time :D .

Regards, Mike.

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nigella Bryant said:

Clouded out with heavy rain here for next few days. Still I managed yesterday and hopefully on Thursday and Friday. Christmas Eve and Christmas Day supposed to be clear here. I don't mind that much as I got it yesterday. These are the sequences so far. 16th to 20th December.

719729585_GreatCojunction-20201216-1715UT.thumb.jpg.cb932360b39471327d110856e987cf89.jpg

181085680_GreatCojunction-20201219-1705UT.thumb.jpg.3a081a1bb8b2cb0e758dc4c09577fe18.jpg

1816103831_GreatCojunction-20201220-1655UT.thumb.jpg.c77de38596ace4046976658cbf87cac0.jpg

That’s a nice record

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.