Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_christmas_presents.thumb.jpg.587637e0d01baf4b6d21b73610610bbb.jpg

Recommended Posts

Greetings stargazers,

 I'm considering buying a new telescope (my first telescope) for astrophotography, and some visual astronomy. 

 But I can't decide which type should I get. I mainly want to photograph deep sky objects. After testing some variations in Stellarium I am worried that some deep sky objects won't fit into the aperture of an 8" reflector.

I'm wondering which type should I get. And also I'm worried that I won't be able to photograph anything with a small refractor because I live near a city. 

I am also open to any suggestions for a beginner astrophotography telescope. (around 800$ would be perfect)

Thank you:)

I apologise if I made any writing mistakes.

Edit: I'm considering buying a Bresser Messier 203/800 or a William Optics Zenithstar 61 but I'm still open to any suggestions.

 

 

 

Edited by Ardoamros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For most DSO imaging a short frac is better. I live in the suburbs of a city, and with an APM 80mm F/6 with Tele-Vue 0.8x reducer and modified Canon EOS 550D I could get things like this:

M42USM3expcropsat2curves.thumb.jpg.13932e16535b78ba0a86f3bc04665276.jpg

after a total of 7 h of exposure time in fairly short subs (still not enough ;) )

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aperture is only important for visual....well apart from the resolution large aperture also gives you for planetary imaging.

For deep sky imaging a small apochromatic refractor will be much easier to use when learning the astrophotography ropes. The aperture isn't important here because the camera sensor is a lot more sensitive the the human eye, and you leave the sensor open to collect the star light and build up a picture over time. The key is to have a mount accurate enough to track with the stars whilst this light is collected, and this is easier to achieve with a short focal length scope like the WO61. 

if you want to do a spot of visual as well you can combine a bit of aperture with short focal length by getting something like the skywatcher 130pds, this only costs about £170 and is a great little imager. Or maybe a slightly larger refractor such as the Skywatcher ED80, there you get the ease of use of a refractor but with a bit more light grasp for visual.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Lockie said:

if you want to do a spot of visual as well you can combine a bit of aperture with short focal length by getting something like the skywatcher 130pds, this only costs about £170 and is a great little imager.

I just suggested the same scope to another new member who wanted to do visual and imaging! Great minds.....

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should I also get a light pollution filter?

A field flattener?

Edit: I'm considering buying a Bresser EXOS-2 Go-To Mount.

Edited by Ardoamros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, RobertI said:

I just suggested the same scope to another new member who wanted to do visual and imaging! Great minds.....

 

Haha, we know it makes sense :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Ardoamros said:

Should I also get a light pollution filter?

A field flattener?

Edit: I'm considering buying a Bresser EXOS-2 Go-To Mount.

Probably the best thing to start with is to buy this book and read it cover to cover at least once:

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/all-books-software/making-every-photon-count-steve-richards.html

This is old stock advice for this forum, lots of us here have passed this right of passage and it was the right advice given to us at the time. Me on the other hand bought all the wrong kit, learned through reading threads and trial and error, then bought the book a few years later which confirmed to me that  should have bought the book in the first place 🙄😄

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Lockie said:

Probably the best thing to start with is to buy this book and read it cover to cover at least once:

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/all-books-software/making-every-photon-count-steve-richards.html

This is old stock advice for this forum, lots of us here have passed this right of passage and it was the right advice given to us at the time. Me on the other hand bought all the wrong kit, learned through reading threads and trial and error, then bought the book a few years later which confirmed to me that  should have bought the book in the first place 🙄😄

is there an online version for that book?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all welcome from land down under

Suggest that you rock up to an astronomy club in your area

Members there only too happy to show you their set-up, and you get an opportunity to view through different scopes

Also astronomy clubs run workshops on AP

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ardoamros said:

is there an online version for that book?

I wonder if @steppenwolf could do you a PDF in exchange for the necessary?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/07/2018 at 22:41, Ardoamros said:

Is there an online version for that book?

No there is no online version and currently no plan to produce one 😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/07/2018 at 21:40, Ardoamros said:

Should I also get a light pollution filter?

A field flattener?

Edit: I'm considering buying a Bresser EXOS-2 Go-To Mount.

For your situation I would aim for a Heq5 mount or better if budget can stretch. Then a small apo like a wo61 or the 130pds reflector. You will find that rhe mount will give you more flexibility in the future. I personally wouldn't get a EXOS. Make it easier for yourself :) 

Yes you will need a field flattener for astrophotography and light pollution. Astronomik CLS are good all rounders. 

Edited by Gerry Casa Christiana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/07/2018 at 16:35, Gerry Casa Christiana said:

For your situation I would aim for a Heq5 mount or better if budget can stretch. Then a small apo like a wo61 or the 130pds reflector. You will find that rhe mount will give you more flexibility in the future. I personally wouldn't get a EXOS. Make it easier for yourself :) 

Yes you will need a field flattener for astrophotography and light pollution. Astronomik CLS are good all rounders. 

I'm buying a field flattener and a 2" CLS filter. But sadly my budget is not stretchy enough for a HEQ-5 mount. 

Edit: That mount is my entire budget. Wow.

Edited by Ardoamros

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ardoamros said:

I'm buying a field flattener and a 2" CLS filter. But sadly my budget is not stretchy enough for a HEQ-5 mount. 

Edit: That mount is my entire budget. Wow.

What about second hand? Lots out there 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/07/2018 at 04:51, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

For most DSO imaging a short frac is better. I live in the suburbs of a city, and with an APM 80mm F/6 with Tele-Vue 0.8x reducer and modified Canon EOS 550D I could get things like this:

M42USM3expcropsat2curves.thumb.jpg.13932e16535b78ba0a86f3bc04665276.jpg

after a total of 7 h of exposure time in fairly short subs (still not enough ;) )

This is a stunning rendition of M42, Michael. Well done!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/07/2018 at 22:36, steppenwolf said:

No there is no online version and currently no plan to produce one 😎

Not to hijack this thread, but Steve, is there a way of ordering both of your books in the one order please (delivery to Australia)? 

Cheers,

Aaron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/07/2018 at 13:36, steppenwolf said:

No there is no online version and currently no plan to produce one 😎

Good to hear! I just ordered the book from FLO for 23 euros. Looking forward to learning from it.

I'm a subtitling software developer and my program was cracked nine years ago, so I applaud your resolve!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/07/2018 at 11:35, Joves said:

Not to hijack this thread, but Steve, is there a way of ordering both of your books in the one order please (delivery to Australia)? 

Cheers,

Aaron

@JovesHi Aaron,

Sorry, I have only just seen this question!!  I have to send the books as two packets (Large Letter as far as the Post Office is concerned) to get adequate insurance from the Post Office, I'm afraid so you would need to order both books and pay the carriage charge. I *could* send these in one parcel as a 'small parcel' but I would have to use a more expensive postal service to get adequate insurance which would negate any saving!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a comment on the mount. In my opinion, for astrophotography, your biggest single investment should be on this item of equipment. You can take good astro images with a variety of optics and cameras, but for DSOs, you do need to track reliably and reasonably accurately.

I'm sure some folks will disagree with this view and the more recent camera technology is perhaps making good tracking lees important, but you will get frustrated with a wibbly wobbly mount.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wholeheartedly agree with the above about the mount. Forget about the field flattener and CLS filter for now and just get a strong mount! I’ve been where you are and cheaped out on the mount (went for a Celestron CG5) and had to sell that in order to get a EQ6 R Pro to support my scope. Just wait until there is an heq5 or eq6 second hand and you will thank us later. You can do with a CG5 or eq5 with a small refractor but once you start adding guiding equipment (and other accessories) and maybe a big Newton or SCG later on in life you’ll need to switch again).

save up, get a heq5. The scope doesn’t matter (an ED80 or WO61 are great to start).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Obi Wan Ken00bi said:

I wholeheartedly agree with the above about the mount. Forget about the field flattener and CLS filter for now and just get a strong mount! I’ve been where you are and cheaped out on the mount (went for a Celestron CG5) and had to sell that in order to get a EQ6 R Pro to support my scope. Just wait until there is an heq5 or eq6 second hand and you will thank us later. You can do with a CG5 or eq5 with a small refractor but once you start adding guiding equipment (and other accessories) and maybe a big Newton or SCG later on in life you’ll need to switch again).

save up, get a heq5. The scope doesn’t matter (an ED80 or WO61 are great to start).

I've been searching for a heq5 mount for a while now. Didn't find any second-hand ones so far. It'll be great if you can send me the link of the website that sells that mount second hand, if you know any.

Thanks for your help everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/08/2018 at 09:20, steppenwolf said:

@JovesHi Aaron,

Sorry, I have only just seen this question!!  I have to send the books as two packets (Large Letter as far as the Post Office is concerned) to get adequate insurance from the Post Office, I'm afraid so you would need to order both books and pay the carriage charge. I *could* send these in one parcel as a 'small parcel' but I would have to use a more expensive postal service to get adequate insurance which would negate any saving!

Thanks Steve, makes sense. I’ll order them both separately on your site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/08/2018 at 20:51, Ardoamros said:

I've been searching for a heq5 mount for a while now. Didn't find any second-hand ones so far. It'll be great if you can send me the link of the website that sells that mount second hand, if you know any.

Thanks for your help everyone.

I’m sure you’ve tried http://www.astrobuysell.com/uk/

personally I’m from Holland so I use www.te-les-koop.nl 

also try this forums classifieds :)

I hope we’re not putting you off the hobby, but deep sky astrophotography requires serious kit and we are hoping to help you spend your money wisely. It’s either saving up for a new heq5, waiting for a second hand or even start with a Skywatcher Star adventurer or something and go for DLSR wide field if you already have the camera and lens. Then you might as well start with a second hand cg5/ eq5 goto or equivalent if you find a good deal and a low weight refractor (like the much used ed80 or a 70mm even) and accept that you’ll have to upgrade the mount at one point in your Astro career :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By JBracegirdle
      I'm new to astronomy, I got my first telescope in November (StarMax 90mm f/13), I was really happy with the view of the moon and double stars, but disappointed I could see but barely make out nebula (initially the ring nebula). I also tried to take a photo of the moon with my phone but trying to get a stable shot was too difficult, even with a basic smartphone adapter.
      I did a bit of research, found about about Video Astronomy/Electronically Assisted Astronomy (EAA) and decided I needed a better mount and took the opportunity to get a faster telescope (StarTravel 102 f5/). I really like the Sky-Watcher -102 AZ GTe with the ZWO ASI 224MC. I've only used it for 4 nights as there is so much cloud about but it's allowed me to take images of things my eyeball wouldn't see. Although my setup is below the minimum specification most would consider for imaging and entry level for visual observations I think I've found a setup that seems to work for me. I like that with SharpCap I can get instant results and the day after when it's back to cloudy I can get a bit more out of the images with Deep Sky Stacker and Gimp. I have tried looking through the eyepiece at the Pleiades, that was a pleasure as well. I can see how observing with a big Dobsonian and amazing eyepieces would be great, but many objects seem better with a camera than eyeballs. The Horsehead nebula wasn't found until astrophotography came into being.
       
      The photo above was taken on my first night with the setup. The January 2019 issue of Sky at Night Magazine has a review of the Sky-Watcher StarTravel-102 AZ GTe and they give it 4.5 / 5. Combining it with an Explore Scientific UHC filter seems to reduce most of the chromatic aberration and increases contrast relative to the stars, and light pollution.

      Video Astronomy/EAA seems to offer a great window into both the visual and imaging worlds of astronomy. As First Light Optics say "Your first telescope is arguably the most important because if the views do not amaze and delight, your interest in astronomy will crash and burn on the runway!" I understand cost could be an issue, but if the beginner had a suitable camera Video Astronomy could be as accessible as a Go-To visual setup, and seems more likely to amaze (especially in the skies of a typical house).
      My question is why is video astronomy not the first suggestion for beginners interested in both visual and imaging?
    • By wavydavy
      For sale a skywatcher startravel 4 inch scope, has end caps and dovetail bar/rings. Would make a great guidescope, retail is £165, asking £100 with postage (ono), excellent condition throughout. Message me if interested...……..



    • By Kronos831
      Probably a stupid question...
      Heyyy soo i am a begginer and about to buy my first telescope.A Skywatcher 200 
      p. I ve just though of something , Since i know filters can be stacked i ve been wondering if i could take visual RGB filters and stack them.Specifically blue green and red in order to create a visual full colour image ,like photography. I know its probably a stupid question because people all over the world would have done this by now .But i m just curious. 
       
      -Kronos
    • By SirHarveyXXI
      Hello all, my name is Harvey and I'm very new to astronomy. After countless hours of reading beforehand, I'd like to start off by saying I know I'm not expecting to see anything close to the pictures seen on the internet from telescopes like Hubble, but something doesn't seem to be right. I have a Celestron AstroMaster 76eq, this is quite a budget telescope due to the fact my budget is less than small. These are the specs:
      700mm Focal Length 76mm Aperture Focal Ratio of 9.21  2 lenses of focal length 10mm and 20mm I'm quite young, and I've been super interested in any and all things space, so obviously getting into astronomy was a definite for me. This is hopefully going to be a life long hobby I'm gonna take up, so any tips for the future are well and truly appreciated (alongside any tips at all to help me get started). Please bare with me, I'm trying to condense this down as much as I can. 😂
      I've done a lot of research into the telescope that I have, and I've read about many people being able to see deep space objects such as Andromeda's core. I have been able to see this (at least, I'm 99% sure) however, attempting to view other deep space objects (such as M1) proves to be difficult. I'm not entirely sure if this is due to me being unable to navigate the night sky effectively, if I'm doing something wrong or I'm expecting too much. I live in a fairly rural area in England with little light pollution, and when observing these deep space objects I make sure that I'm as far away from the light pollution as I can get. This leads on to my first question...
      How much of a difference does the humidity make? England generally has VERY high levels of humidity, and I'm wondering if this is going to make a huge difference to what I can see? I've never really seen the humidity to be less than 75%, so if it makes a huge difference I presume that I won't be able to view any deep space objects? That being said, should my telescope be able to see deep space object with this level of humidity amongst other viewing problems? I try my best to ensure (like I said earlier) that I can make the viewing conditions as optimal as possible where I can (i.e. not viewing objects in the direction of light pollution, making sure that I go out in low levels of cloud, making sure I observe objects as high up in the sky as I can etc). On the subject of the telescope itself... 
      How much of a difference does collimation make? Will it be the difference between seeing an object or not if the collimation of my mirrors isn't very good? Should a telescope of my calibre be able to make out the major details of planets? e.g. the ring of Saturn and the bands of Jupiter? Or am I expecting too much of my telescope? I have just ordered a 2x Barlow lens to bring me close up to the maximum magnification my telescope can realistically handle (140x), so I'm wondering if this will help me see these finer details or if Jupiter will still be merely a bright light? How much of a difference do filters make at lower magnifications such as 70-140x on planets such as Jupiter, Saturn or Mars? Are they worth the investment this early on or are they more of an investment to make later on? How important are high quality eyepieces? Are they worth the investment early on or later on? The problem with this is that eyepieces can get quite pricey and as I said before, I'm on a very low budget.  That being said, is the level of astronomy I'm after even possible on my budget? Will I be able to see deep space objects like M1 and other nebulae? By seeing them, I mean as blurry blobs, not detailed objects.  Terribly sorry for the masses of questions (of which I'm sure most of you will have seen a thousand times!), but I've been searching for a long time and haven't found many answers relevant to my situation. As I said, I'm very open to any suggestions, tips and recommendations! Thank you for reading! If there's any more information you need, ask me and I'll try my best to give you it! 
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.