Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_beauty_night_skies.thumb.jpg.2711ade15e31d01524e7dc52d15c4217.jpg

OwO

Astronomy Club at highschool

Recommended Posts

My High school is giving us the option to make our own clubs. I would some opinions on making an astronomy club

 Logically I know such a club should be at night but I still wojld like to give this a shot. What do you think I should do? Thank you!

1500872852003.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being in CA, you might also ask this on Cloudy Nights since it is US centric.  I did a search of their threads from google and turned up a few older posts on the subject that might get you started.

Being in Oakland, I'd contact the UC Berkeley astronomy department for a start.  They probably have an outreach program that could help.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, OwO said:

Logically I know such a club should be at night

Start with the theory at a High School club : how to get started , the basics in observation , etc 

Then , if you get enough interest , move on to practical and arrange a star party at night :hello:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Together with friends I set up an astronomy club at my highschool, after we found out there was a small refractor at school. We organized several evening sessions, kicking off with a total lunar eclipse exactly 39 years ago today. We also organized lectures (I personally gave quite a few on stellar evolution), and we could often be seen with the scope and a solar projection set-up, observing the sun. That drew in quite a few new members.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son's school were gifted an apparently large telescope and one of the physics teachers tried to set up an astronomy club - they had a sufficient amount of interest from the students, but clearly due to scheduling of other school events were required to nominate a scheduled meeting point and time immediately after school hours - coming back in the evening not being an option due to the school being closed and many pupils arriving by bus from out of town locations.  Between the few nights dark enough to use a telescope at that time of days at school during the winter terms and being able to clock for a clear night at that time the club never did get a clear observing night and although they played with setting up their 'scope on local chimney pots and had some talks the lack of being able to actually go observing meant in the finish that the club died a natural death - def. a shame, but no way around it!  Best of luck with the idea, perhaps your weather is more predictable than ours.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OwO: You should contact the head of a local astronomy club; they will guide you along, giving you options of what you'd like to do. They will certainly invite you out to join with them at their stargazing events, public outreach programs, etc. They might even have a loaner scope they can provide you with, after you learn how to use it. Ronald Lewis, Founder & President, Green Mountain Astronomers (Vermont)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with talking to someone at UC Berkeley to help you get started, at least to give you some direction. You've also got 4 great planetariums in the Oakland-San Francisco area. The Charles F. Hagar Planetarium also has an observatory. Morrison Planetarium bills itself as the largest all-digital planetarium in the world.

Obviously, observing would be a nighttime operation, but there's a lot you can do for club activities during daylight.  Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First off - Greetings, OwO, and a warm welcome to SGL - it's great to have you aboard!

For help and questions - you've certainly come to the right place! We LOVE helping to find answers in these many forums.

You could start by finding some local Astronomy Clubs in your area and ask them for advice and ask if they might know of anyone who'd be willing to come and speak to your friends about how to go about forming an astronomy-group, as they've done. Ask about some professors from a local university who'd be interested in coming out - or you going to the university - and give a talk on the subject(s)  you're interested in - Astronomy!

At your school, do you have a science-teacher to sponsor you, and keep informed of what & how you're going about this to establish communications with the faculty & administration within the High School. They should be delighted by this! And setting-up a government for the club itself is a priority to work out. I suggest that every member have an equal voice regards steering the group and deciding what people would like to do: Have night's for outdoor observations together. How to get some equipment and funding to this end - telescope(s), eyepieces, star-charting books & software-programs such as Stellarium (You should all LOVE this! And it's totally free! Each member can have their own copy to set-up personally in a way to reflect their own interests & tastes. I'll leave a 'screenshot' below of my own (highly-advanced) copy of 'Stella' :p)

This should get you going - and keep asking any questions you find!

Starry Skies -

Dave

 

Stellarium hunting for a comet -

stellarium-785.thumb.png.1cb01cdffc48fcbacafb565888c391aa.png

Click on image for larger sizes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 for Stellarium.  http://stellarium.org/en_GB/   There are also several apps. that you can load on a mobile phone or tablet, (I use, the free, SkyPortal), that will show the constellations moving in your view as you point the phone/tablet at different parts of the sky. 

If you want to start with a little daytime observing, that does not require an expensive, complex, telescope setup, you have the Sun and Moon. I was looking at the half-Moon, yesterday, mid-afternoon, with a small refractor on a tripod, and was able to see a lot of detail on the light/dark boundary. Provided that you are very, very, careful with safety; again, using the same small refractor, but now fitted with a solar filter over its objective lens (sheet of the silvered film material similar to that used in the cardboard-frame glasses used for observing solar eclipses), I was able to get a good view of the Sun, and look for sunspots; it's a quiet period in the solar cycle, so I did not spot any yesterday.

Geoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Wavseeker
      Ladies and gentleman, 
      Thank you for helping me in advance. 
      As a kid I've always been fascinated with the sky and what was in it. The nights sky is filled with beautiful stars and nebulae and I want to see them for myself and be amazed how insignificant we really are compared to this vast open space. So let me adress some of the key points that I want for a first scope.
      1. Around €1000
      2. Big aperture, I want to see as much as possible and as far as possible while not losing a clear image
      3. I would like to have a push to or go to system
      4. Beginner friendly
      5. Size is not a problem 
      8. I prefer reflectors since it seems they give more aperture for the money but if you know a better scope that sees more with less aperture let me know
      9. I have a Canon 550D and maybe I could use this for a bit of astrophotography. This is last on the list tho and can be scrapped if the first 3 points aren't met
      Of course build quality is very important when making my choice so keep that in mind as well.
      I'm looking forward to you guys advice. 
       Happy stargazing and clear skies! 
    • By stardude07
      Hello,
      I am wanting (not really 😪) to sell my Stellarvue SV105-3SV with tube rings [not shown in pictures]. The telescope is in great condition with very little dust and no scratches. There is one very small ding in the dew shield paint but it is not dented and it is almost not even noticeable. It happened when I took the telescope out of the saddle and it lightly hit the saddle. The telescope has never been dropped or had any issues and is optically perfect with a strehl of .95 or higher (claimed by Stellarvue).
      I've only used this telescope for imaging however I've once or twice thrown an eyepiece in it during a star party or two and it's VERY crisp with no false color.
      Currently I live in Italy so that's where it can be picked up or shipped from. Price is negotiable however Stellarvue says it is worth around $1200-$1500 USD. The nice thing is you wouldn't have any VAT from Stellarvue . Please let me know if you have any questions, comments or are interested.
      Lastly, here is a link to some images that I've taken with it and what it looks like mounted up: https://www.astrobin.com/users/chriscorkill/
      SV105-3SV Specifications
      Aperture: 105mm Apochromatic Precision Triplet Focuser: 3" Dual Speed Focuser with 2" and 1.25" eye piece adapters F Ratio: f/7 Focal Length: 735mm Color Correction: Excellent Minimum Tube Length: 16" in travel mode Tube Diameter: ~ 4-1/8" (105mm) Dew Shield Diameter: ~ 5-3/8" (137mm) OTA Weight: ~12lbs (5.4kg) Retractable Dewshield: Yes


    • By MikeODay
      The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy (  NGC 1365 ) in the Constellation Fornax

      ……………………….
      ( edit - star chart added )

       
      The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy ( NGC 1365 ) - Chart   ( please click/tap on image see larger and sharper version )
      A full size ( 6200 x 4407px ) image can be downloaded from here.
      ……………………….
      Details:
      Below the equator, not seen from much of the Northern hemisphere, NGC 1365 passes very nearly directly overhead an observer situated near Cape Town, as Sir John Herschel was in November of 1837 when he discovered this “remarkable nebula” that is numbered 2552 in his book of observations from the Cape.
      Not called a “nebula” now, of course, this striking object is one of the nearest and most studied examples of a barred spiral ( SB ) galaxy that also has an active galactic nuclei resulting in its designation as a Seyfert galaxy.
      At around 60 M light years from Earth, NGC 1365 is still seen to occupy a relatively large area ( 12 by 6 arc minutes ) due to its great size; at some 200,000 light years or so across, NGC 1365 is nearly twice as wide as the Milky Way and considerably wider than both the Sculptor and Andromeda galaxies.
      This High Dynamic Range ( HDR ) image is built up from multiple exposures ranging from 4 to 240 seconds with the aim of capturing the faint detail in the spiral arms of the galaxy whilst also retaining colour in the brightest star ( the orange-red 7th magnitude giant, HD 22425 ).  Also, scattered throughout the image, and somewhat more difficult to see, are numerous and far more distant galaxies.
      .................
      Identification:
      The Great Barred Spiral Galaxy
      New General Catalogue -  NGC 1365
      General Catalogue -  GC 731
      John Herschel ( Cape of Good Hope ) # 2552 - Nov 28, 29 1837
      Principal Galaxy Catlogue - PCG 13179
      ESO 358-17
      IRAS 03317-3618
      RA (2000.0) 3h 33m 37.2 s
      DEC (2000.0) -36 deg 8' 36.5"
      10th magnitude Seyfert-type galaxy in the Fornaux cluster of galaxies
      200 Kly diameter
      60 Mly distance
      ..................
      Capture Details:
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
      Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1375mm f4.7
      Mount: Skywatcher EQ8
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera:
      Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)
      Location:
      Blue Mountains, Australia 
      Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )
      Capture ( 3, 7 & 8 Dec 2018 )
      7 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at unity gain ( ISO 250).
      140 x 240s + 10 each @ 4s to 120s
      total around 9.7 hrs 
      Processing ( Pixinsight )
      Calibration: master bias, master flat , master dark
      Integration in 7 sets
      HDR combination 
      Links:
      500px.com/MikeODay
      photo.net/photos/MikeODay
      <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mike-oday">www.flickr.com/photos/mike-oday</a>
      Image Plate Solution
      ===================================
      Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image )
      Rotation .......... -0.003 deg  ( North is up )
      Field of view ..... 58' 37" x 38' 55"
      Image center ...... RA: 03 33 36  Dec: -36 08 27
      ===================================
       
       
    • By MikeODay
      The Cat's Paw Nebula ( NGC 6334 ) in Scorpius 
      updated ( slight tweak to colour balance, a little brighter and tad more contrast )  

      ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here )
      ......
      original:

      ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here )
      ……………………...
      Also known as the Bear Claw Nebula, NGC 6334 is an emission nebula near the scorpion's tail in the Scorpius constellation. 
      Image details:
      Image centre ...... RA: 17 20 08.185  Dec: -35 52 30.91
      Field of view ..... 57' 37.8" x 38' 51.8"
      Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up )
      Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
      Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7
      Mount: Skywatcher EQ8
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera:
      Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)
      Location:
      Blue Mountains, Australia 
      Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )
      Capture ( July 2018 )
      6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO 250.
      168 x 4 min frames plus ~10 frames each for the shorter exposures  
      Processing:
      Calibration: bias, dark and flat
      Integration in 8 sets
      HDR combination 
      Pixinsight July 2018
    • By MikeODay
      Update: 3rd June
      Re-processed to remove slight magenta tint caused by the non-uniform removal of light pollution by the DBE process ( it was being fooled by the very bright image centre ).

      The globular star cluster Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper )
      A full size image can be found  here.
       
      original below
      .....
      A newly captured ( May 2018 ) image of the great southern globular star cluster, Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 )

      Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus - ( please click / tap image to see larger and sharper )
      A full size ( ~ 6000 x 4000 ) image can be found here 
      ....... 
      This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the colours of the stars, including in the core.
      Image details:
      Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image )
      Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( up is North )
      Focal ............. 1375.99 mm
      Pixel size ........ 3.91 um
      Field of view ..... 58' 20.9" x 38' 55.1"
      Image center ...... RA: 13 26 45.065 Dec: -47 28 27.26
      Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
      Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
      Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7
      Mount: Skywatcher Eq8
      Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 
      Camera:
      Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)\
      Location:
      Blue Mountains, Australia 
      Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )
      Capture ( May 2018 )
      8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO 250.
      Processing:
      Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark
      Integration in 8 sets
      HDR combination 
      Pixinsight May 2018
       
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.