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Hawksmoor

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About Hawksmoor

  • Rank
    Proto Star
  • Birthday 28/11/49

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://george-artcabinedujardin.blogspot.co.uk/

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Travel, art, astronomy, photography, music, the theatre, chess and mathematics.
  • Location
    East Anglia UK

Recent Profile Visitors

7,832 profile views
  1. Started preparatory work on my fixed pier and spectrometer mark3. I like a nice 'slow burn' project or two.  Night sky over Lowestoft not conducive to observational astronomy other than in radio frequencies. If all else fails I've lots of meteor radar ping data to analyse from last year.

    And so off to bed and dream land.

  2. Nice clear night in the early hours of Valentine's Day.  Tried to find the two comets in and around Bootes. Sadly my trials and tribulations with binoculars and small refractor came to no avail. I might have got away with it, if it had not been for that pesky moonlight!  Cloud in Lowestoft tonight so in my warm  bed with March edition of Astronomy Now.

    Nighty night stargazers.

  3. Light snow and cloud in Lowestoft, so no chance of viewing the fast moving Comet in Hercules or penumbral lunar eclipse tonight.

     

    1. JimT

      JimT

      Been waiting and hoping for a little bit of clear sky all day George but no chance, grey skies all over.  Got on with resurrecting the garden observatory, coming along well, still lots to do   :)

      Jim

  4. Today  Suffolk County Council swapped an all new LED lamp for the old high pressure sodium lamp outside our house. Looks very bright but luckily our house is in between the lamp and our backyard from which I stargaze. Let's hope in my lifetime, the Council continues to turn the street lights off at midnight.  I will let you know how I and the new lamp get on!

    George from Lumenstoft.

    1. Show previous comments  8 more
    2. Hawksmoor

      Hawksmoor

      Yes Jim,  I'm a bit worried  as they have left a lot of sodiums all around me but changed the one outside my house to LEDs.  As LED lamps are cheaper to run I'm hoping they dont leave mine on over night whilst turning out the rest. It did go out at midnight last night but you never know what they have planned.  I dont think it would affect my astrophotography much but it would stop my wife from getting a good nights sleep. The  lamp is virtually in line with our bedroom window.  She  is a very poor sleeper anyway and  is very light sensitive.  Keeping my fingers crossed that after midnight it will remain astronomically dark in our bit of  Oulton Broad.

      George

    3. JimT

      JimT

      You should be okay George, all the minor road lights are going off, I think it was a one off over the Christmas period.  This changeover will take awhile as it seems to be a bit haphazard, one on each street every month or so   lol

      Jim

    4. Hawksmoor

      Hawksmoor

      Hooray it's just gone off!:hello2::hello2::hello2:

      So I'm off to bed.

      George

  5. Really nice image. I like looking at the double cluster through my bins and although I've imaged it I've never thought that I did it justice. Your photograph does - well done ! Regards George
  6. Oh dear! old age and chubby fingers on a small screen have caused me to repeat myself repeatedly ! Embarrassed of Lowestoft.
  7. Generally from our backyard on the edge of Lowestoft we can see the Milky Way summer and winter after astronomical darkness and before the street lights are turned off at midnight. When the street lights are extinguished observing closer to the horizon becomes much improved and widefield imaging becomes significantly easier. With no moon I have been able to see M31 with the naked eye and M33 with binoculars. The double cluster is easy to spot and some stars are visible within the square of Pegasus. Generally, I consider my location reasonably darkish. Not as good as the Sahara but better than Greater London. George
  8. Generally from our backyard on the edge of Lowestoft we can see the Milky Way summer and winter after astronomical darkness and before the street lights are turned off at midnight. When the street lights are extinguished observing closer to the horizon becomes much improved and widefield imaging becomes significantly easier. With no moon I have been able to see M31 with the naked eye and M33 with binoculars. The double cluster is easy to spot and some stars are visible within the square of Pegasus. Generally, I consider my location reasonably darkish. Not as good as the Sahara but better than Greater London. George
  9. No stars tonight in Lowestoft. So off to bed.

    Nighty night space cadets.

  10. Thank you very much for your kind comment. I was quite pleased to find my first asteroid amongst all the very many stars. Regards George
  11. VESTA20012017anno.png

    From the album Comets, Meteors and Asteroids

    My first attempt at imaging an asteroid on the 20th January 2017 using my Canon 600D DSLR with EOS 18-55mm lens at f=45mm and ISO800 - all mounted on a Star Adventurer. The Asteroid Vesta on the border between Cancer and Gemini. Image created from a stack of 11x 2min lights in DeepSkyStacker. Jim T on SGL used his imaging rig to image Vesta and kindly confirmed that the speck of light on my widefield image was probably Vesta. Finally, I checked that I had identified the asteroid correctly by imaging the same area of sky on the 24th Jan and determined that the small dot had moved against the fixed backdrop of stars. I put together a GIF using the image from the 20th and 24th. All round quite pleased with this first for me.
  12. Vesta-on-the-move.gif

    From the album Comets, Meteors and Asteroids

    Vesta on the 20th of Jan and 24th Jan 2017. Very small and a long way away but moving at considerable speed!
  13. Would have made a proper mess of our backyard and put the wind up our neighbour's cat! George
  14. 5888f37e29940-AurigaBestWiderfield.png

    From the album Backyard Astronomy

    It was a bit misty last night (24-01-2017) but decided it was worth a go with my quick to set up Canon 600D DSLR on the Star Adventurer - 18-55mm EOS lens at about f=45mm . 15x 4min lights at ISO800, 5xdarks and 20xflats . 4mins exposure seemed to push the Star-Adventurer to its limit as there was some star trailing that I removed in FITS Work freeware. Could be my short-comings in Polaris alignment? Anyway I reckon you can see M36, M37, M38 and IC405 without too much trouble.
  15. Another clear night until  23.00 when according to Lowestoft BBC Weather "The Fog" will come rolling in off the sea by 'Spivey Point'.:happy7:

    1. JimT

      JimT

      Nice one George, I decided not to open up when I seen the beginning of a foggy night here on the estate, gave me a rest anyway and an evening the better half :)

      Jim