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gnomus

Pickering's Triangle Bicolour - PI Only Experiment

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For reasons unknown, we experienced a good night here last night.  Indeed, I managed to get 5 hours of data during 'Astro Dark' - all of it with reasonable guiding.  I had an hour of Ha  from the previous evening.  So this made 9 x 20 mins of Ha and 9 x 20 mins of OIII.  All captured using the Esprit 120 and the QSI 690.  Filters were 3nm Astrodons.

I did my pre-processing in PixInsight.  The stacks looked reasonable and I just 'kept going' in PixInsight.  This is PixInsight with no Photoshop whatsoever, which is a first for me.  It is reasonably clean but my original plan was to get at least 6 hours of Ha and OIII, and I may carry on with that.  As usual, I'd appreciate comments and criticism.

07_HistTrans.png

Edited by gnomus
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Lovely misty 3D quality to that Steve, really like it.

Is that the full FOV of the scope / camera, are you using a reducer ?

Dave

Edited by Davey-T
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13 minutes ago, MattJenko said:

Lovely. Only a bazillion more panels to go :)

Thanks Matt, but this will have to remain just a detail - if I was in my twenties then there may be time....

9 minutes ago, Davey-T said:

Lovely misty quality to that Steve, really like it.

Is that the full FOV of the scope / camera, are you using a reducer ?

Dave

Thanks Dave.  It is the full FOV (just cropping out the rough edges).  I have the Skywatcher flattener for the Esprit.  Not sure if they do a reducer - Barry Wilson suggested that the WO reducer/flattener might work with it.

Thanks also to Michael and Sara.

 

Edited by gnomus

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Excellent Steve.  Nothing to suggest as this is a super image.  All PI too . . . . :icescream:.  Lights blue touch paper and walks away . . .

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2 minutes ago, Barry-Wilson said:

Excellent Steve.  Nothing to suggest as this is a super image.  All PI too . . . . :icescream:.  Lights blue touch paper and walks away . . .

Shhh.  Don't tell Olly....

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Cracking image Gromit - er I mean Gnomus :)  Absolutely beautiful :)

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Thank you Peter and Gina for your kind comments.

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      Edit, final:

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