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Found 31 results

  1. I grabbed 3h40m of the Sadr region stretching from the crescent up to NGC6914 (not visible as it's a reflection neb!), in HA light - may add to this in HA, but also would be nice to bring LRGB into it at a later date. QHY163M, Canon 200mm 2.8L II (working at f3.85), Losmandy GM8 - taken 17th Sept 2018, West Oxfordshire. All in 5min subs, guided with a ASI120MM on a 50mm guider. Baader 7nm filter. Processed in PI. Thanks for looking. (ergh - jpg compression artifacts aren't great in this
  2. A couple of firsts for me on this one. Narrowband imaging with a clip in Ha filter in modded 1100D. Also first time that i have reached 15min subs where i have been happy. The following image is just 3 x 15 min subs stacked, exported just the red channel in Nebulosity and a light dusting of levels and curves in Gimp. Also had lots of problems last night getting star allignment - Guess it was just as I was rusty. Last had the scope out in May!!! Cheers John
  3. Unexpected clear evening last night, and with the rich starfield of Cygnus overhead I decided to have a go at a previously untried nebula for me, NGC6888, the Crescent Nebula. Due to the considerable light pollution here in the heart of industrial Tyneside, I've gone for my usual Hydrogen Alpha filtration, in this case a Baader 2" 7nm filter fitted within the adaptive optics unit. Image is 10 stacked lights of 900 second duration giving 2.5 hours of total exposure, and calibrated with bias frames, flats (dark flats) and dark frames. Imaged with SX-VR H36 through a Pentax 75 SDHF scope which gives a 3 arcseconds per pixel resolution giving a massive field of view of 4.16 x 2.78 degrees. Optics mounted on an EQ8, guiding camera was a SX Lodestar activated through a SX-AO unit. Guiding and image collection software was Maxim DL 6, stacking was done usig DSS, image tweaking was through PS CS3 Thanks for looking, Steve
  4. There's a lot wrong with this image! Egg shaped stars because I didn't have the spacing right etc. But great fun to be imaging again for the first time since March - more notes in table below re processing etc. Details Object name Crescent Nebula Object ID NGC 6888 Date(s) 5 Aug 17 Telescope Altair 115mm Camera ASI1600MM Luminance 0 Red 0 Green 0 Blue 0 Ha 19x5 min Oiii 0 Sii 0 Total time 1.5 hours Frames 0 Processing PixInsight / Bias, Flats, no darks / Levels / Curves / ATWT Notes With a full Moon low in the South I couldn’t image this object in colour, but with narrow band filters I was able to get a good set of h-alpha sub frames to process. As this was the first imaging session of the year it was inevitable that things were not going to go perfectly. Thankfully the guiding with PhD 2 worked perfectly and I was quickly capturing subs. However, I didn’t have the spacing right between the camera and the field flattener and this resulted in egg shaped stars at the four corners of the image. I figured out that I had included a 50mm nose piece adapter where I should’ve just screwed the filter wheel directly to the flattener. A large note has been made :-) Amazing that I’m able to image in the light of a full Moon and get some results to practice with.
  5. I had a quick session with my new to me 20x80 Opticron, Japanese made binos tonight. I have them tripod mounted using a trigger grip ball head which works very well. Lovely views of M42, trapezium split nicely and surprisingly a gentle green tint to the nebula. Anyway, the crescent moon was also looking lovely with prominent earthshine. There was a fair amount of CA as is to be expected, but still a nice sharp view along the terminator. Three shots here, all hand held at the binos. I made sure I focused the binos using my glasses first, otherwise the images are obviously out of focus! First one was exposed for the earthshine, the second is converted to mono to get rid of the CA and the third is exposed for the terminator. All tweaked on the phone using PS Express. Quite pleased with the results, given the inappropriateness for imaging of the kit used
  6. Just thought I would post these single frame shots of the Moon with Earthshine. I took them whilst I was waiting to see if I could catch a glimps of C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS), but no luck! Taken with a Canon 1100D on a Slick 88 camera tripod. Settings: 70mm & 210mm focal lengths, F/4, 2/5", 400 ISO. I believe the comet should have been directly below the Moon by about 5-7 degs, but there was some cloud along the horizon with haze above that, which I think is where the comet was!
  7. From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece with Moon Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  8. Dan Watts

    Moon

    From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece with Moon Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  9. Dan Watts

    Crescent of Moon

    From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  10. Typically, my first light image with my new 3nm Astrodon Ha filter took place under almost full Moon conditions but in some ways, this was quite a useful test in its own right as clear skies and full Moons seem to attract one another! There isn't much in the way of available nebulae around this time of the year so an early riser like the Crescent Nebula seemed as good a choice as any but I had to wait until 00:20 before I could get started. Nice to see the Soap Bubble Nebula in there as well. Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: William Optics FLT98 CCD Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Guiding: OAG/LodeStar Filter: Astrodon 3nm Ha Exposure: 13 x 1200 sec Date: 09/05/17 + 10/05/17 Calibration: Bias, Darks & Flats I think I'm going to like this filter .....
  11. Shibby

    Crescent Close-Up

    From the album: Deep Sky

    17x600s 450D + 7nm Ha Filter

    © Lewis (Shibby)

  12. Dan Watts

    Surface of Moon

    From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece with Moon Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  13. One shot (live photo) with iPhone 8+, not sure which EP I used... 32mm Plossl? 10" Dob, processed to enhance details on the phone with Photoshop Mix (adjusted contrast, clarity and saturation up, shadows down) and crop.
  14. Whilst out earlier i had my camera with me and took a shot of the Moon at around 26% crescent, but forgot my tripod.....D'oh But considering its handheld, i'm more than pleased with the sharpness, most were blurred though lol I've had worse shots with the tripod
  15. After a month of chasing the Moon, not always successfully, I have finished my Moon Phase chart for November. Original fullsize, 6800 x 4337px, 2.7MB image here - http://www.sacarr.co.uk/astro/moon/2016_moon_phases.jpg Across the month, I've missed a weeks worth of phases, mainly due to weather. Unfortunately after twelve consecutive days of capture, the weather again let me down for the last two tiny crescents which I'd hoped to catch at Moonrise. So I've managed twenty phases captured, plus of course the New Moon which is too close to the Sun to see. The phases I missed have been ghosted in behind the clouds with Stellarium screen grabs. My previous best was February 2015, when I caught seventeen phases, and thirteen consecutively.
  16. The Crescent Nebula NGC 6888 The Crescent Nebula rides on the Swan’s neck in Cygnus in a dense swathe of Milky Way stars - an ideal target for my first bi-colour image with my new Astrodon 3nm Ha and OIII filters and Esprit 150 telescope. The nebula was discovered by William Herschel on 15th September, 1792 and he described it as ‘A double star of the 8th magnitude with a faint south preceding milky ray joining to it.8’ long by 1.5’ broad’. This double star is not the prominent star with an apparent companion close to the heart of the nebula, rather, it is ADS13515 at the 2 o’clock position on the nebula’s bright periphery. The bright star off-centre of the nebula is particularly significant as this is the star that is powering the emissions from the surrounding gas cloud. This magnitude +7.5 star, HD192163, is of the Wolf-Rayet type and is also designated WR-136. Charles Wolf and Georges Rayet first described wolf-Rayet stars in 1867 following detection of their broad emission lines. The Wolf-Rayet stage applies to stars with an original mass in excess of 30 times our own Sun’s mass. This stage comes late in the star's evolution when a rapidly expanding shell of hot gas is powered outwards by the stellar wind only to collide with the much slower-moving gas clouds that were ejected thousands of years previously when the star entered its Red Giant phase. These forceful collisions produce a shock wave that generates an enormous amount of energy including wavelengths within the light spectrum, allowing us to observe them. This complex process displays as an arc of bright nebulosity that we identify as the Crescent Nebula. Long exposure images fill in this arc producing a crab-shell shaped nebulous region rich in Hydrogen Alpha and doubly ionised Oxygen emissions. WR-136 is fated to go supernova at some time in the future – watch this space! Image Stats Mount: Mesu 200 Telescope: Sky-Watcher Esprit 150 ED Pro CCD Camera: QSI 683 WSG-8 Sampling: 1.04”/pixel Guiding: OAG/LodeStar Filters: Astrodon 3nm Ha and 3nm OIII Exposure: 30 x 1800 sec Ha, 15 x 1800 sec OIII Date: 11/06/17 + 19/06/17 – much of which was under Lunar illumination Calibration: Bias, Darks & Flats Object Stats RA: 20° 12’ 04.6” Dec: 38° 30’ 46.0” Magnitude: +10.0 Distance: 4700 light years The Crescent Nebula – NGC 6888 Comparison of Ha and OIII data We imagers (well me anyway!) tend to think that Ha is the all-powerful emission line in nebulous objects but it is interesting to compare the Ha and OIII data for this structure as there is an enormous amount of OIII emission present in The Crescent Nebula.
  17. From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece + Baader Neodymium Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  18. From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece + Baader Neodymium Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  19. Just a short note on last nights observing under exceptional skies. I started out using the 15" Astrosystems and finished using the eyes. Needless to say the views through the scope were fantastic with the 20mm Lunt/UHC/OIII revealing the Little Veil segment in direct vision. Two things about this- first the extra wide FOV is not your friend on this one, its better to keep 12 Cygni out of view if possible and second- a filter slide is a huge asset. Last night I flicked back and forth between the OIII/UHC and this seemed to pop it out in the UHC. Actually, doing this seems to help the eye get more "contrast". The Crescent was filled with nebulosity- this is a stunning object under the right conditions. Not much more to say except to keep viewing it often... The scope observing lasted not very long.. as the naked eye Milky Way took over the viewing. I recognized new to me structure up in Cepheus with a spur jutting into the Aldermin area almost obliterating any chance I had to navigate there. The stars and MW structure had me "lost" again- zero chance to find NGC 6946 and its companion. Over in Cass the bright jagged spur enveloped the area but up "above" Caph there was a large "hole" - an area of dust" ?, not many stars visible in it. My new description for portions of the Milky Way is now "jagged", man our galaxy gives superb views. It was so good I forgot the scope and layed back in the lawn chair (again). Gotta love the coming cold weather, last night was -3c, I can't wait for winter!
  20. Dan Watts

    Moon

    From the album: My Astro Pics

    Taken with my Panasonic Lumix through a Baader Zoom Eyepiece with Moon Filter using my Orion XT8.

    © ©DanielJamesWatts

  21. From the album: Images

    Lunar mosaic made up of 13 ish panels. 200p f/5 with point grey firefly mono. I've spent far too long trying to get the background how I like it so I've given up whilst I'm reasonably happy with it.

    © Daniel Robb

  22. So this was more of a refresher exercise than anything - checking kit, software, operator (!), etc.... 12 x 900 Baader 7nm Ha, ED80 + 0.85 reducer/flattener + AtikOne 6.0 Something is askew somewhere as there is definite smearing - most visible top right of the image - so that needs to be tracked down and sorted. Not a patch on whipdry's that I've just seen, but it's my first image in I-dont-know-how-long - just pleased everything was more-or-less working and I 'sort-of' remembered how to use PixInsight!!
  23. From the album: Deep Sky

    2x17x600s 450D + 7nm Ha Filter

    © Lewis (Shibby)

  24. Well it was a good night, weather-wise, last night (12-Nov-2017) in this part of Oxfordshire. Cool (3 degrees) but amazingly dry, really (85%.) And so, for once, everything wasn't covered in dew by the end of the night. After an earlier debacle with coma-corrector spacing, I've shaved off a further 0.5mm to try and tweak it a bit better, but I've also (for my sins) started a trial period with PI. I've so far eschewed this box of tools in favour of simpler, and some home-grown, things. But I'm interested in finding out more about what so many people use... even if only to understand the PI-speak language a bit better. As a result of all this, I want to try things out on some smallish datasets, and ended up with: Crescent, 12 x 300s (60 min) Pelican, 17 x 300s (85 min) Iris, 12 x 300s (60 min) Horsehead, 6 x 300s (30 min) Quattro 8" on Avalon M-Uno, QHY8L OSC, captured, guided, and dithered, by Nebulosity, pretty poorly processed in PI (my fault, not its) including bias, darks, and flats. Some observations about the images: Crescent... a difficult RGB target, I've tried but failed to reduce the background stars Pelican... just a bit too big for the frame, but the extra data (more than 60 mins) helps with noise Iris... real problems with the background. The APS-C sensor is just a bit too big for this scope? Horsehead... my first ever attempt at this. Pleased to have resolved the Alnitak double. Sad to have framed it so poorly for the Flame. No doubt the processing is very ham-fisted for my first use of PI, so any C&C is positively encouraged! Thanks for looking.
  25. From the album: Jon's images

    10 shots taken with a DSLR, stacked and fiddled with in Registax, then in Lightroom.
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