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Found 69 results

  1. Hi, this is my first time using my new Esprit 100ED, my first time processing using Pixinsight, and it's my first image using a Mono + filters. I loved them, can't wait to try on more targets. here's the result: Equipments: SkyWatcher Esprit 100ED SkyWatcher EQ6-R SkyWatcher EvoGuide 50ED Guidescope Imaging cam ZWO ASI1600MM Cool Pro ZWO EFW ZWO LRGB+NB 36mm filters Guiding cam ZWO ASI290MM Mini Seeing was avarage Location was in a Green Zone Exposures: Ha 11x1800sec L 39x300sec R 13x300sec G 15x300sec B 15x300sec Darks: 24x300sec 10x1800sec Bias: 70 Thanks
  2. Reprocessed to try to better balance the colours ... (previous version: http://stargazerslounge.com/topic/239687-eta-carinae-nebula/ )
  3. Conditions have been very poor down in Sydney for the last month (rain, clouds or 'darn' moon every night ) so no new images but at least I have plenty of time for lots of reprocessing ... This one was captured back at the beginning of the year and I'm still playing with it. Here I have been trying to get to grips with the HDR composition function in PixInsight. It is built up from four sets of around 20 images each at 4sec, 8sec, 30sec and 120sec all at ISO800 with my unmodified Nikon D5300. And this is the previous attempt. I think I prefer the composition, colours and contrast of the new version.
  4. Hi everyone, I've been spending some time processing over cloudy christmas and realised the thing I find most daunting, difficult and annoying is creating star masks. So my question is - is there a way of creating star masks (in Pixinsight preferably, but open to other ways!) which is (a) always accurate (b) relatively quick (c) repeatable? I've worked through LVA tutorials and looked at David Ault's technique. I also have the Bracken book to go through. Main techniques seem to be: 1. Stretch extracted lightness, clip low, bring down highlights, then use Star Mask process - very inconsistent results I get with this approach 2. Similar to above, but use MMT/MLT to remove nebulosity to create support image, then use different star scale Star Masks to capture all stars and then use pixelmath to put them all onto one image - very time consuming I find, also lots of noise setting fiddling I am very interested to see how people go about this and whether there are any neat tips and tricks to help the process! Thanks!
  5. Can someone please give me some guidance on processing a luminance stack in PixInsight. I've looked at a number of web resources and Keller's book but I'm still a bit confused about what I might expect to achieve - what should the end result look like. Apologies for this being M101 again and the quality of the image but it was high in the sky and convenient for a short night with non-optimal seeing. The image comprises 19x300s subs (you know I don't know why I didn't take 20 with my OCD and all that) which I've calibrated with 50 each dark, bias and flats, registered and stacked in PixInsight. I've used STF to pull the image from the background and then saved as a jpg so you can view the image. It's taken with an Atik428ex mono on a SW80ED DS-Pro + NEQ6-Pro using SGP and PHD - focussed as best I could recognising the seeing conditions. I think I am getting the hang of processing osc rgb images in PI but I'm not sure of the best approach with a luminance image and what I might expect to achieve. I've included the fit and xsif file if somone wouldn't mind having a go and showing me what is achievable and what I should typically aim for - and how! I am keen to try to get to grips with the mechanics before those long dark nights set in - whenever that might be! As ever many thanks in anticipation of any help/guidance/advice. Adrian P.S. ImageAnalysis gives me the following stats on the image: Is this good, bad or indifferent? What is 'good' and what is 'bad' or 'in need of improvement'? Thank you M101-luminance.fit M101-Luminance.xisf
  6. File Dirbble 1.4.0 1. This version can see the fits and xisf header information. 2. You can edit the fits file header. 3. You can use full automatic file moving function by clicking the button. It uses fits and xisf's header info. FileDribble_setup_v1.4.0.zip
  7. Update 16th June: I could not wait to tell people that I was just notified that my image of Omega Centauri will be published as a future NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day ( APOD ) - my first ever I will update the thread when they publish. ................................. A deep look at Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) This image is an attempt to look deeply into the the Omega Centauri globular cluster by using HDR techniques to record as many faint stars as I can whilst retaining colour and detail in the bright stars, including at the core ... ............. Reprocessed to bring out more faint stars and to produce a smother transition between brightness levels. New version ( 12 June 2017 ): Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see lager and sharper ) .......... Old version: Omega Centauri ( NGC 5129 ) ( please click / tap on image to see full size and sharper ) Image details: from www.nova.astrometry.net: Size: 58.6 x 39 arcmins, Centre: 13h 26 min 50.4 sec, -47deg 28' 39.1''. Orientation: up is -89.9 East of North ( ie. E^ N> ). Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7. Mount: Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT. Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 . Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels). No filter Long Exposure noise reduction off Location:. Blue Mountains, Australia. Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ). Capture: 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO800. Processing:. Calibration: master bias, master flat and no darks. Integration in 9 sets. HDR combination. Pixinsight May 2017
  8. The Silver Coin Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) in the Sculptor constellation - updated. 24th March 2017: New version that was reprocessed ( again ) to improve colour balance ... original version below ( colours are a little too yellow ) ( click on image to see full size ) The Silver Coin Galaxy ( NGC 253 ) in the Sculptor constellation ( aka the Silver Dollar or Sculptor Galaxy ). Caroline Herschel in 1783 was the first to recordthis bright ‘nebula’ in an area of the southern sky that Nicolas de Lacaille had called the “Apparatus Sculptoris” or “the sculptor’s studio”. Whilst relatively close to us compared to the billions of far more distant galaxies in the Universe, the great size of the “Sculptor Galaxy” and the huge distances involved are still hard to comprehend. To put this into some perspective, the light that is just now reaching one edge of the great disc left the opposite edge when the Earth was in the grip of last great Ice Age 70,000 years ago and the light we now see has been travelling towards us for over 11 million years. Details: NGC 253 - "Silver Coin" or "Sculptor" galaxy. RA 00 48 23, DEC -25 11 52. Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & no filter. Nikon D5300 (unmodified). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 20 x 180 sec ISO 800, long exp noise reduction on. Pixinsight & Photoshop. 4th November 2016 updated version 17 March 2017
  9. Hi guys I've looked and looked for an answer to this but following tutorials has got me no nearer I've a stack of shots processed in dss and then taken the image to pixinsight when I do the stf it's pretty good but for the life of me I can't get it to save like this can any one shed some light on what I'm doing wrong I'm tearing my hair out with this one Regards Baz
  10. I had another good night recovering my imaging skills on 28th with M42 as the subject. Equinox 80, Canon 1000D, 20 frames each from 2sec to 300sec at ISO 800. I used the HDR tool in PixInsight using this tutorial. I like it. I am not sure I believe all that brown stuff near the Running Man, but this is definitely the best image I have created of M42. Not what it looks like through the eyepiece, but revealing a lot more detail than previous attempts. What does everyone else think? Good, bad, meh? I have kept the processing to the minimum steps so it is possible I might be able to do more with this, but happy the way it is. Happy New Year all!
  11. Carina Nebula with the bright unstable star Eta Carinae in the centre of the image. edit ( 27 March ): Tweak to shadow levels to bring out more detail and also a slight reduction in the brightness of the highlights. A much larger version ( 4562 x 3072 6062 x 4082) is available on my Flickr page. previous version: Carinae Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) From Wikipedia ... "Eta Carinae is a highly luminous hypergiant star. Estimates of its mass range from 100 to 150 times the mass of the Sun, and its luminosity is about four million times that of the Sun." This HDR image is constructed from 12 sets of exposures ranging from 1/8 sec ( to capture the bright centre of Eta Carinae ) through to 240 seconds. Total exposure time around 13 hours 17-19 March 2018 Image details: Objects in image: Hypergiant, Eta Carinae ( HD 93308 ) in the centre of the Homunculus Nebula Carina Nebula ( NGC 3372 ) Keyhole Nebula Open Star Clusters: - Trumpler 14, 15, 16 - Collinder 232 Field of view ..... 59' 18.2" x 39' 56.0" Image centre ...... RA: 10 45 01.762 Dec: -59 40 52.87 Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 17, 18 & 19 March 2018 ): 12 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/8s to 240s ) all at ISO250. ( 181 x 240sec + 10 to 20 each for the other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 12 sets HDR combination Pixinsight March 2018
  12. Hi, I have been plucking away with PI at this data I have of the Leo Triplet for a few days now, and I just can't get it right. Particularly color is causing me problems.. It seems to come out either very red, or really low on color. I am hoping someone would give it a whirl and see wha they can get, and maybe point me in the right direction (maybe @wimvb pretty please! :)). As I use PI it would be preferable if someone with PI would try, but anyone is more than welcome to try. The data was captured with a modified EOS 600D and an Optolong CLS-CCD filter. Stack consists of 37x240s frames at ISO1600 - calibrated with Bias, Flats and Darks in PI (Total integration: 148 minutes) https://www.dropbox.com/s/n3nerojediicz7x/integration.tif?dl=0 This is where I am at currently: Is it a matter of an 80mm refractor + DSLR not beign up to the task of capturing something like this? Clear skies! //Johannes
  13. Update: 3rd June Re-processed to remove slight magenta tint caused by the non-uniform removal of light pollution by the DBE process ( it was being fooled by the very bright image centre ). The globular star cluster Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) A full size image can be found here. original below ..... A newly captured ( May 2018 ) image of the great southern globular star cluster, Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) Omega Centauri ( NGC 5139 ) in Centaurus - ( please click / tap image to see larger and sharper ) A full size ( ~ 6000 x 4000 ) image can be found here ....... This image is an attempt to look deeply into the mighty Omega Centauri star cluster and, by using HDR techniques, record as many of its faint members as possible whilst capturing and bringing out the colours of the stars, including in the core. Image details: Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px ( full size image ) Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( up is North ) Focal ............. 1375.99 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 58' 20.9" x 38' 55.1" Image center ...... RA: 13 26 45.065 Dec: -47 28 27.26 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher Eq8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)\ Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( May 2018 ) 8 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 2s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 8 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  14. Galaxy NGC 4945 in Centaurus Details: Galaxy NGC 4945 in Centaurus 19 May 2018 Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7\ Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) image Plate Solver script version 5.0 =========== Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px Rotation .......... North is up Focal ............. 1375.43 mm Pixel size ........ 3.91 um Field of view ..... 43' 27.2" x 28' 54.2" Image center ...... RA: 13 04 51.790 Dec: -49 30 37.17 ========== Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 19 May 2018 ): 10 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/2th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 41 x 240sec + ~8 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 10 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  15. From the album: Mike's Images

    The Lagoon Nebula ( Messier 8, NGC 6523 ) in the constellation Sagittarius - by Mike O'Day ( https://500px.com/mikeoday ) The Laboon Nebula ( M8 ) is visible to the naked eye under dark skies from most latitudes except the far north. Seemingly covering an area about three times that of the full Moon, M8 actually covers an area somewhat greater than 110 light years and is around 4300 light years from Earth in the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm of the Milkyway galaxy. Links: https://500px.com/MikeODay http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Details: Messier 8, NGC 6523 - Lagoon Nebula. also contains: NGC 6526 NGC 6530 NGC 6533 IC 1271 IC 4678 7SGR 9SGR Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount. Orion auto guider - PHD2. Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector, UHC-S 'nebula' filter. Nikon D300 (unmodified) (14bit NEF). Field of view (deg) ~ 1.35 x 0.90. 20 x 120 sec ISO400. 26 x 30 sec ISO 1600. 23 x 240 sec ISO 200. PixInsight and Photoshop. 2 August 14 . re-processed 24 April 2016 to include the additional subs ( the first version only made use of the 23 x 240 sec ISO 200 subs ) and putting use the processing lessons I have learnt over the past year.

    © Copyright Mike O'Day 2016 - all rights reserved

  16. wimvb

    Messier 88

    From the album: Liverpool Telescope

    Messier 88 galaxy 9 x 90 s Blue 7 x 90 s Green 19 x 90 s Red Some of the frames are 120 s exposures Processed in PixInsight

    © Wim v Berlo

  17. Also known as the Theta Carinae Cluster, The Southen Pleiades is a very bright open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille during his visit to South Africa in 1752. Containing around 60 stars, IC 2602 shines with an overall magnitude of 1.9 and its brightest member is Theta Carinae with a visual magnitude of 2.7. This cluster of young blue stars is relatively close to us at "only" 479 light years. 5 May 2018 The Southern Pleiades ( IC 2602 ) in Carina ( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper ) ......... Image details: Orientation: North is up Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.91um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 5 May 2018 ): 14 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1/30th sec to 240 sec ) all at ISO250. ( 22 x 240sec + at least 10 each forthe other durations ) Processing: Calibration: master bias, master flat and master dark Integration in 14 sets HDR combination Pixinsight May 2018
  18. “The Blue Bunny Nebula” .......... Edit: 27 Jan 2018 - updated again to try to draw more faint nebulosity out of the background; ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ......... Edit: 24 Jan 2018 - stars a little brighter and tighter with no change to the rest of the image ( NGC 2359 - Thor’s Helmet ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger and without compression artefacts ( and double click on that image if you what to see it as I posted it ! ) ) ................. original: Thor's Helmet ( NGC 2359 ) in the constellation Canis Major Thor’s Helmet ( Duck Nebula, NGC 2359 ) ( please click / tap on image to see larger ) This HDR image shows the bright nebula Thor’s Helmet in a sea of colourful stars against a background of red from dust and HA emissions. The stars in this image range from the brightest ( bottom right, HD 56501 ) at magnitude +7.7 to around +20 or more. HDR capture and processing allows all of the stars to be portrayed in colour without any burnt-out highlights. The colours of the stars and nebula are as close as I can get them to their "true colours" by using a "daylight colour balance" and allowing for the extinction of blue-green due to atmospheric absorption/scattering ( mean altitude during capture ~ 60deg ). The blue star in the centre of the bubble of expanding stellar material is HD 56925 ( WR7 ) - a massive, unstable and short-lived Wolf-Rayet star that one day will detonate in a supernova. Image details: NGC 2359 Thor’s Helmet / Duck Nebula: Magnitude +11.5, RA (2000.0) 7h 15m 37s, Dec -13deg 12' 8", approx. 1800 light years away HD 56925 / Wolf-Rayet 7 ( WR7 ) ( blue 11.5 mag star at centre of “bubble” ) Haffner 6 ( open ster cluster centre left of image ) Plate Solution: Resolution ........ 1.318 arcsec/px Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up ) Focal ............. 1398.41 mm Field of view ..... 57' 40.8" x 38' 29.0" Image center ...... RA: 07 18 36.509 Dec: -13 11 53.38 Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ). Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x. Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1410mm f4.7 Mount: Skywatcher EQ8 Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 Camera: Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels) Location: Blue Mountains, Australia Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map ) Capture ( 18 & 19 Jan 2018 ) 9 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 1s to 240s ) all at ISO 250. 116 x 240s + 5 each @ 1s to 120s Processing ( Pixinsight - 20 Jan 18 ) Calibration: master bias, master dark and master flat Integration in 9 sets HDR combination arcSinH stretch
  19. Hello all, I am trying to process data captured on friday during almost full moon, and I'm having a hell of a time of it.. Due to the full moon doing it's best sun impression my target was an open cluster (NGC 225 in Cassiopea), thinking it would be doable. I was using my 2" Explore Scientific CLS filter, my unmodded Nikon D7100 and captured 92 usable 45 second subs at ISO 400. Calibrated with bias and flat frames and stacked with linear fit clipping as the pixel rejection algorith. The mission for the night was not getting particularly good data, but getting decent tracking and round stars, something I have had lots of trouble with! Now that I am trying to process it, I find im dealing with some very nasty gradients / casts and I can't seem to get any good colors. An initial strech reveals a strong blue color cast/gradient that I can deal with in a number of ways. Linear fit DBE ABE followed by the usual: SCNR (green) Color Calibration No matter what I do I end up with the whole image being either really green or really red and not much else for color in any of the stars. I also think i burned out all the major stars by over saturation.. I know the CLS filter is going to wreak havoc on colors because it completely blocks parts of the spectrum, so maybe the CLS filter is just the wrong tool for the job? If anyone would like to show me what they can get from this data, and how (so preferably with PI) I would be really grateful. At the moment im thinking maybe the data is just really bad and not useable? Linked is the final integrated xisf (only xopped slightly): https://www.dropbox.com/s/nmxds87toc7vz51/integration.xisf?dl=0
  20. Presenting my first attempt at Bi colour imaging. This is the Rosette Nebula (NGC2244), which is located in the constellation of Monoceros. Telescope: Orion 80ED Mount: Sky Watcher HEQ5PRO Camera: QHY9s Mono Filter wheel: QHYFW2 Filters: Baader 7nm Ha, 8.5nm OIII Exposure: 300sX30Ha, 300sX22 OIII captured on the nights of 1st and 8th January 2019 Stacked in Deep sky stacker, proceed in Pixinsight, finished in Photoshop
  21. Hi, Hoping for some help here.. Im trying to learn some basic processing in PixInsight, including the PreProcessing (calibration, registrering, stacking, etc.) Im using the only data I have, from my very first lights of M13, calibrated with a SUPER BIAS, no darks and flats yet. When doing it in DSS I get 7 images stacked and the stacked file looks OK. Switching to PixInsight it goes horribly wrong after stacking, and the stacked picture looks like the attached. I have done the whole process in two different ways, but get the same basic result. 1. Doing all the steps manually: Calibration, Debayering, SubFrameSelection, StarAlignment, Stacking. 2. Doing everyting with the BatchPreprocessing script I yield the same result, its like the subs aren't properly aligned, even though the process has eliminated A LOT of bad frames (from 26 to 5). Link to zip with the 5 registered light: https://www.dropbox.com/s/sj2ytaa00u5qlap/GREAT CLUSTER_LIGHT_45s_400iso.zip?dl=0 Hope someone can give me some pointers, none of the tutorials I have been following explains why this can happen. Thanks in advance stargazers!
  22. Hi All, I usually image at 1x binning and thought i'd try some 2x binning and i'm a little confused about the calibration process. So i created some new 2x binned flats and then tried calibrating them with my SuperBias and Master Dark in Pixinsight which then winged about incompatible geometry. So do i need to create my darks or Superbias as 2x binning to allow me to calibrate my 2x flats ? cheers, Rich.
  23. The Great Nebula in Orion ( Messier 42, NGC 1976 ) ( tap on image to see larger ) Scrapbook page ... Details: The Great Orion Nebula (Messier 42, Messier 43, NGC 1976 ) in the Orion Constellation RA 5 36 15, DEC -5 26 31 ( 2016.9 ) Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian telescope Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion Short Tube 80mm guide scope & auto guider - PHD2 Baader MPCC Mark 3 Coma Corrector & no filter Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Field of view (deg) < ~ 1.35 x 0.90 long exp noise reduction on 45 x 120 sec ISO 400, 15 x 60 sec ISO 100, +various short exposures 3 to 15 sec to extend dynamic range for bright stars Pixinsight & Photoshop 28th November 2016
  24. FYI Just found this on the PixInsight forum: http://pixinsight.com/forum/index.php?topic=10042.0 I haven't been able to check it out yet, but as it is from one of the experts on PI, it looks promising.
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