Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

Qualia

Mars & Observing the Red Planet

Recommended Posts

Excellent article, I take it the good seeing last night was the exception rather than the rule for Mars then :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish I read this before moaning how rubbish mars was to observe last night on another post guess patience is needed ☺

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure how I missed this until now. This is a most excellent and succinct article, Rob. Many thanks for your time and patience in making this availabel to us all - you are a credit to SGL! This kind of thing is what makes SGL such a fascinating, friendly and amazing place to hang out in!

Clear skies!

Edited by Marki
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks very much for a great read, Qualia! The past two or three months have been an eye-opener and great to get a better understanding of the background of this planet. I'm still amazed by the current magnitude in relation to Jupiter and assume it is well and truly the second brightest object in our sky not counting our moon and the sun, of course. Your recommendation for patience while observing sure is true! This is a very elusive object.............but rewarding.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great guide to that small red dot so many of us like.Its amazing to see how some of us never give up,persist and get what they deserve a good look at a small planet far far away.I have see that red dot in my small telescope this year and I did not get to see any detail,but still i was fascinated by the planet.It is odd that so many people are fascinated by this planet and it is nice also giving the small ones a chance.There are lots of questions answered here on our big blue dot ,but there are million of other questions up there in space.Lets hope mankind persists like we did on this small planet and explores the places we observed.Lets face it there are still loads of questions here,but by time they will be answered and science will have no questions answer.There are already loads of problems here which can be solved up there and questions too that need to be answered.Are we alone?Why does the universe exist?Why are we here for? and countless others that probably wont be answered.Astronomy is the queen of all sciences after math i think and that's what we should focus on.Lets hope one day the planet we were once observing will be in the future a stepping stone to travelling across the universe.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, thanks for the brilliant and informative post.

Secondly, I would like to share my experience of the first (and so far, only) telescopic viewing of Mars.

Having a north-facing garden, it can be quite difficult to get good views of the planets, but I managed to set the scope up at the far end of the garden, and got a view over the top of the house. Now, I'd been out that day to a beer festival with my brother, and as you could imagine, focusing the scope was a little bit of a tricky exercise, and as a consequence, I don't think that it was brilliant. Still, to be able to show my brother one of our planetary neighbours was one of those occasions I'll remember for a very long time. Just to be outside, sitting and talking and musing on life, philosophy and real ale, while looking at something that is millions of kilometers away is a truly awesome experience. So thank you Qualia for reminding me of that occasion with this post!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a great story about Mars related stuff.One day a friend wrote me a message through facebook and he said: Have u heard about the company Marsone? I've decided that i want to go to Mars I'll wright to them tomorrow.I laughed so much I thought he was kidding me turns out he wasn't and he sent me his registration account than i had a look he was positioned 213k place i think. I told him that he has bigger chances getting a girlfriend than being chosen to go to mars.It's fascinating that so many people want to g there,but really It's also fascinating how many people can be tricked so easily.I mean Marsone i think will not take people to mars just imagine how much money they would need.It is possible yes,but they won't do it :) Heh hope u had a good laugh too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great post, very informative thanks!  Ill definately try the patience tip next time I'm observing Mars.  I really hope we will see man on Mars in my lifetime!  :cool:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm only a lurker most of the time but this is great stuff! Really great contribution to the forum!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As stated in the opening post, sketching at the eyepiece trains the observer to see more. Back in 2003 I made over 30 sketches of Mars, each sketch brought to my attention detail that wasn't immediately obvious. This really emphasised to me the importance of sketching even when the conditions at first appear to be less than favourable. There is almost always much more on view than first meets the eye. Attached is a composite drawning / map of the martian albedo features as seen throughout that favourable apparition through a 5" refractor at X120. Bear in mind that Mars was around 25 seconds of arc at its best though the drawings were made throughout the entire apparition. 20 drawings were used in producing the map.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry! Not able to attach file for Mars map for the above post. Apparently its too large. Stupid machines! This is why I prefer using a pencil! Mike :-(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above pencil and wash sketch mapping the Martian surface, was made using a Takahashi FS 128 F8.1 Fluorite Apochromat, and compiled from twenty of the best eyepiece drawings chosen from those Id managed to make during that fine apparition. Mars was around 25 seconds of arc in diameter when at its best. No colour filters were used.

Mike

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to mention the map was drawn on a cylindrical grid, allowing a quite accurate representation of features.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.