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CJ77

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About CJ77

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    South Yorks
  1. I'm impressed with this, as I have the same scope, and I'm looking to have a bash at some astrophotography with my existing kit at some point. It gives me an idea of the kind of results that I might eventually be able to achieve. I've also seen your M81 and M82 on a separate post, and I can't wait to get started! Thanks for sharing!
  2. I think that a different approach can almost be taken here - rather than looking for "wow" targets, you could spend sessions looking around a particular constellation just to see what you can find, then identifying them (either from memory and a good reference book/star atlas), or by sketching? Might be particularly suitable for a Dob, and that way you might find your own wonders of the sky? I'm thinking in particular of the amateur astronomer Father Lucien Kemble who identified Kemble's Cascade among other things during his lifetime?
  3. I've split it with my 127 Mak at both 60x and 167x (see attached for a sketch at 167x) Should be more than achievable with your kit - and the colours are spectacular.....
  4. Thanks Carl, It is the standard Alt/Az mount, so I wasn't expecting to get brilliant results at this stage, particularly the long exposure stuff..... Its as much a case of get some passable results so that I can convince the Mrs that I need to upgrade the mount and/or scope.... I'll have a look at the 700d though. Thanks again
  5. Hi All, I'm tentatively looking to make a DSLR purchase with a view to hooking it up to my 127 Mak. I do not currently have a camera, so I feel that a DSLR for general use as well as Astro use would be the best option, however, I'm unsure as to which is the best one to look at. If I were to set a maximum budget of £500, (to include T-ring and adaptors, and support for the camera), which would be the best buy? I've seen elsewhere that Canon seem to be the recommended manufacturer, with the 600d being good, but I'm open to other suggestions? Also, with my scope having a speed of f/11.8, what would be the likely problems I would experience? Ideally, I would like to photograph a general mixture of items, planetary, lunar and deep-sky, but I am aware that DSLR may not give the best results, so I'm just curious as to what people recommend? Thanks, CJ
  6. At present, I'm strictly a back garden viewer, dodging next door's security light. However, being in suburbia, I have mixed conditions - to the west, I have quite severe light pollution; to the north, the skies are quite clear, but obstructed by the houses behind: the east isn't too bad, and the south is completely obscured by my house (If I go to the end of the garden, I set several security lights off......) Despite this, I get some lovely planetary views if they're high enough up, and I get reasonable views of clusters.....
  7. I love the composition of this! Thanks for sharing, and I look forward to seeing any refinements that you make......
  8. Hi Ruud, Glad to have you aboard. CJ
  9. CJ77

    Hello Everyone

    I live in Doncaster - we don't have the darkest of skies here, but I've managed to see Jupiter, Saturn, Mars and Uranus easily from the back garden (planets aren't too affected by light pollution), and I'm on 3 galaxies and counting. Later in the year, the Orion Nebula is stunning even with moonlight washing part of it out. The double Cluster in Perseus is probably my favourite object at the moment, and if you can manage to split Albeiro (easy enough with the 127), you'll clearly see a blue star and a yellow star, which blew me away (I never realised that you could actually discern the colours of stars with your eyes......)
  10. CJ77

    Hello Everyone

    Not a problem John. I have seen Jupiter and 4 moons with it, Saturn's rings and several moons, lunar craters, galaxies, open star clusters and much more, so there is plenty to see once you get it going. I think that someone has mentioned Turn Left At Orion above, but if they haven't it's a cracking book for identifying targets and how to find them in three different sizes of scope (available from on-line bookstores and probably through astronomy retailers). Stellarium is also good to have on a lap-top, or the mobile version, while not being as comprehensive is still useful for those "What am I looking at?" moments when you're actually out there. The scope was recommended to me by Rother Valley Optics (I actually went in with the aim of buying a bigger Dobsonian reflector, but I made the mistake of going in with the girlfriend, who took one look at the size of the Dob and said that we weren't having THAT in the house......) I haven't regretted the choice either.... CJ
  11. CJ77

    Hello Everyone

    Hi John and welcome to SGL. I also have the Celestron 127 Mak, and early on, I had one or two issues with the GOTO. You probably have already done all of these, so please forgive me if you have, but things I always check: Is the longitude setting correct? the closest default to Doncaster (where I live) is Leeds, if I remember correctly, but it may be better to use actual Lat/Long if you know them? Is the time setting correct? Its quite easy to get either the date or time settings wrong due to the date being in the US format or being in GMT instead of Daylight Saving? Is the power supply adequate? I found that batteries run out very quickly, so for back-yard observing I use a 12V power cable connected to the mains. Is the scope level using the spirit level bubble on the mount? Anyway, I hope that your problem is as easily solved as mine were. Its a cracking little scope, and as someone has mentioned above, I only ever use the 9mm (or 6mm that I've purchased) eyepiece on planetary work. For everything else, the 25mm is as powerful as you'll need really, and I'm considering a 40mm to catch some of the wider objects. Happy hunting! CJ
  12. When I was young (maybe 3/4), my mum wrote to NASA, asking if they had any info on the Voyager missions, which were all over the news at the time. They wrote back with an envelope full of technical data on the missions and glossy photos of some of the pictures taken (including the famous false colour ones of Saturn's rings) and so an obsession was born. I imagine that the NASA website will have all sorts of images aimed at younger budding astronomers now.....? If not, email them and see what they respond with?
  13. Making Every Photon Count ordered..... toe well and truly dipped into the murky waters now
  14. I have the Celestron 127 SLT Mak from the link in PeterCPC's post above, and through this in the last 12 months I have seen (in no particular order): Craters on the moon, Mars, Jupiter and its moons, Saturn, Uranus. Open star clusters Galaxies An emission nebula Double stars with different colours, Sunspots on the sun (Never ever look at the sun without a proper solar filter - see elsewhere on this site for details) And the best thing is, that there are countless other objects to see. So in summary: I can't speak for the Skywatcher, but I imagine it will be similar to the Celestron. It was my first scope, and I have found it easy to use, and it has kept my enthusiasm up. It was recommended to me by a member of staff at my local Astronomical supplier, and I haven't regretted it at all. But as mentioned above, I have picked up some additional bits and bobs (eyepiece, solar filter, moon filter and books - Turn Left At Orion is a great investment too, as is a pair of binoculars.) So all the best with your choice, and hopefully it will be many happy evenings spent with your daughter fighting over the eyepiece! CJ
  15. Once again, Thanks all for your time and patience. First step is to get "Making Every Photon Count", and then to set myself a budget. My feeling is, though that if I'm going to do it, then I will try and do it piecemeal, but properly, so expect more newbie daft questions going forwards!
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