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Andyb90

Rosette Nebula possible in 10 inch Dob?

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Hi Everyone,

Just wondering if viewing the Rosette nebula would be possible in my 10 inch Dob?

I can get to a good dark sky location.

Also I've got a UHC and OIII filter, but I'm not sure if they would help.

Andy.

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What you need is a dark sky, an OIII filter and a large exit pupil (e.g. 4-5mm).

With the conditions above you can see it with a pair of bins 15x70.

It's a large object though and I fear you won't be able to frame it even with the largest eyepiece usable with your scope.

Lovely target :)

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The Rosette is about 1.3° in diameter, which is about the same as the maximum FOV in my C8, at 2030mm focal length with a 2" EP. A 10" F/4.7 Dob has a 1200mm focal length so should be able to frame it with a really wide EP

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Hi Andy,

I observed Rosette nebula in 10 inch dob last year. Absolutely outstanding object.

Ethos 13 mm + OIII and I had the feeling like I was sitting in the spaceship looking through a window. Three dimensional effect of nebulosity around the bright cluster NGC 2244 was breathtaking. Size of 1.3 degree could not fit into my field of view.

Though! This year I observed it with 20 inch dob and it was not impressive at all due to poor transparency and 90% humidity.

So you probably need a good seeing and transparency to appreciate this object.

All the best and clear skies,

Tatyana

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I have seen it in my 200p from the dark skies of Galloway.

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I'm hoping to get out to a dark site in Shropshire near the Welsh border this week. Fingers crossed I'll get the chance to try for the Rosette.

Andy.

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Andy, its going to work! It seems to grow under dark skies, try both the filters. I was viewing it with great success the other night in my 90mm,120mm with a low power widefield, in this case a 42mm Vixen lvw.

Great advice above, the 25mm will work well, look for the edges first and while your in the neighborhood look at the Monkey Head neb, straight up from the Rosette, just off the top  tip of Gemini, another good one.

Looking forward to the report!

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It looks great in my 10" with a 31mm Nagler and O-III filter as the whole thing fits in nicely. 

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Yup, I managed it in my 10" dob last year - 28mm Maxvision and an Astronomik O-III filter. I found it bigger than the field of view, and that I first spotted it by 'scanning' over where it should be. You could see the stars background get brighter, then dimmer, with a slightly darker patch in the middle. I tried again a few days later and it was much more obvious - and a few days after that I couldn't see it at all.

As noted, it needs a good clear sky (which there has been a shortage of around here for the last few months...)

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This was very nice in my 106mm apo a couple of years back. With a 21mm Ethos and OIII it was beautifully framed and so possibly easier than having to find the edges in a narrower fov. Should still be possible to fit in your scope with a 28mm or 31mm 82 degree eyepiece.

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BTW, I found the dust lanes in the centre the easiest parts to pick up with the C8. They have the most prominent edges and are much clearer than the rather diffuse boundaries of the nebula

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I'm gonna try for this target next time I'm out...

On a scale of M42 to Veil, how hard would you say it is? I've managed the eastern and western veil with my OIII filter.

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Looking at the surface brightness, I would say it's harder than the Veil, hard to remember a direct comparison.

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Looking at the surface brightness, I would say it's harder than the Veil, 

I would agree Stu. 

From the UK it doesn't get so high in the sky which probably doesn't help it either.

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Its puffier, the edges are not as well defined and it loves a large TFOV. The interior shows very nicely with some structure in there. With a narrow TFOV it is easy to look right through it and from dark, transparent skies with the OIII and a good widefield this object is visually great. As mentioned above the low placement of the object does not help.

This object grows and grows in dark skies with a UHC...

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Thanks for the suggestion to also look at the Monkey Head nebula jetstream.

I've also got the following on my list:

M42 - as I've only ever seen it from the back garden with a fair bit of light pollution.

M1 - not seen yet.

M81 and M82 - would like to re-visit them as its been a while.

M33 - again just about made this out from my garden, but would like to compare with a dark site.

I think from reading other posts the HH would be pretty much out of the question, but maybe the flame neb would be possible?

Any other suggestions would be very welcome.

Andy.

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The Eskimo nebula is a fantastic sight, NGC 2392 in Gemini and M97, the Owl nebula in UMA take high mag well and from dark sites no filter is needed, again crank up the magnification. In Cass, NGC 281, the Pacman neb can be hard to see, but get the OIII and your low power widefield and give it a try, in dark skies the inner lane will stand out, from lighter skies look for a grey, moderate size cloud.

Happy hunting!

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Monkey head and rosette seen with the 80mm tonight, risking frostbite! Pretty good transparency, but the flame was not so visible as it can be. Orion Nebula lovely and puffy as always.

Can we have clear and a wee but warmer please!

PEterW

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Any other suggestions would be very welcome.

Ghost of Jupiter Nebula?

Messier 46, and the planetary nebula NGC2438 within it?

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I was using my 200p for imaging last night and I had my Heritage-100p out to do some observing with it. I used my 20 mm EP and an OIII filter and, sure enough, the Rosette was clearly visible. This is the first time I've really seen it so clearly as the FOV of the F5 200p isn't quite large enough to allow the Rosette to be seen to be picked out well beyond the edges. It was very obvious withe the little 200p at F4. I was very pleased with the view as this is the first time that I've seen the Rosette so clearly. I later used the 200p with a 32 mm EP and the OIII filter. The centre hole in the Rosette was clear bu tthe outer edges, which were almost touching the edges of the FOV, weren't nearly as distinctive. I think that the wider viewing field really helps with this object. The OIII certainly makes a dramatic difference.

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Thanks for the suggestion to also look at the Monkey Head nebula jetstream.

I've also got the following on my list:

M42 - as I've only ever seen it from the back garden with a fair bit of light pollution.

M1 - not seen yet.

M81 and M82 - would like to re-visit them as its been a while.

M33 - again just about made this out from my garden, but would like to compare with a dark site.

I think from reading other posts the HH would be pretty much out of the question, but maybe the flame neb would be possible?

Any other suggestions would be very welcome.

Andy.

Flame Nebula will be possible from the location you are planning to go to, from an aperture of 8 inches upwards. It will be a fine sight, too.   :)

M42 will look stunning!! There's just more of it...  and more detail...

M1 rough outer edges can be seen and hints of filaments within the nebula

M81 and M82 - M82's central rift can be clearly seen

M33's spiral arms can be discerned with an 8" telescope and averted vision, resolves more clearly with larger apertures.

Have a crack at the Cone Nebula too: NGC 2264...a sweet find and a strange object when it suddenly and discretely pops into view...

And the Eskimo Nebula..under larger apertures, the outer fuzzy shell can be easily discerned.

With regard to the Rosette Nebula...I simply have not got round to finding it yet, so I can't say whether you will find it, but it's worth a go and more than possible in the Shropshire/Welsh borders (used to live there)...

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Have a crack at the Cone Nebula too: NGC 2264...a sweet find and a strange object when it suddenly and discretely pops into view...

This is an extremely tough target that requires excellent transparency and dark skies, Good luck :)

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This is an extremely tough target that requires excellent transparency and dark skies, Good luck :)

This was a target I acquired regularly in the dark skies of South Shropshire...

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