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dob 200p


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As far as I know this is the most recommended all-round telescope around here...

I think you probably need two things as extras: a telrad and a right angled finder scope. They'll make your life much easier.

Edited by emadmoussa
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A number of 200p Dob users like to sit down for observing (drum stool or adjustable ironing seat). So far I prefer standing up at the eyepiece so I mount the scope on a water butt stand. I also tend to have to relocate the scope to access various parts of the sky. This often means being on grass rather than flag stones or gravel. The plastic water butt stand keeps the melamine coated chipboard Dob mount well away from the damp grass, which can only be good for the long term to avoid swelling and then distortion of the Alt and Az bearing surfaces. The raised position also makes the straight through finderscope (and Telrad if you buy one) easier to use without contorting your back/neck. I have replaced the finderscope with the RACI version, but don't find this change essential since the Telrad is a straight through design anyway.

A number of 200p Dob owners like to 'pimp' their scopes. I personally have added a setting circle and Wixey for surprisingly accurate 'PushTo' object location. I have also modified the Azimuth bearing with a Lazy Susan one, but replacing the three pieces of teflon with three or preferably six furniture sliders is much more critical to the smooth feel of the mount than the actual bearing. In my opinion you could just as well use a slightly longer centre bolt and retain the original plastic sleeve (I've tried both methods).

Others have flocked the inside of the tube to maximise contrast, and I may one day.

Of course the other accessories you may consider will be better EPs!

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Whilst I agree with both of the above (great idea with the water butt by the way), the simple answer for getting started is NOTHING. The 200p comes with all the accessories you'll need to start stargazing... After you've spent a couple of months getting to know your scope you can start to think about any upgrades/improvements you'd like to make. For example, personally I hate right angled finders whilst others love them; but you wont get to know until you've had to live with your telescope for a while.

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Hi James (Beardy30),

and welcome to SGL from me to. The dobsonian is a great bit of kit and 8" aperture will give great views over a wide range of objects and is not too big to be impracticable. Lots of room for modifications, but as other members have said its best to keep things simple to start with and get used to the kit. Somewhat contradicting this advice, I would recommend getting a long tube cheshire collimator so that you can get/keep the scope in collimation and I've also found the RDF (Telrad or Rigel) make it a lot simpler/more intuitive to find your way around. The other oft quoted essential reading for starting off is Turn Left at Orion, which provides a lot of info to help get you started and finding your way around.

Good luck and clear skies - Jake

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I sometimes wonder if a 127mm Mak would have been better choice than a 200P Dob for it's portability and longer focus. But each and every time, I come to a conclusion I am glad having chosen the 200P Dob. If had to have one scope, this is the one.

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A 200p "Dob" really seems to be the entry-point scope these days for most. It offers the biggest bang for buck. If you ever think you will want to do imaging...................then get it on an EQ mount. It will be known as a newtonian reflector.

Great all-rounder. Great aperture. Will serve you well for many years.

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My first scope was an ETX 80 refractor, which is a great for portability, but I soon wanted something a bit bigger and decided on the 200p Dobsonian. I have not been disappointed and am well on my way through the Messier objects. I no longer crave aperture....eyepieces though, are another matter....

So yes, the 200p is a great choice. Don't get anything else to start with, just spend a bit of time learning to recognise some of the constellations with your naked eye and then train the scope on them to see what extra it shows. Once you are a bit more used to the night sky you'll soon decide which accessories you need.

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