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assouptro

My best Rosette to date..

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I believe, as the title states, this is my best capture of the beautiful rosette nebula. 
The nebula in Monoceros is approximately 5200 light years away The Rosette nebula and the open cluster NGC 2244 are about 130ly in diameter, about 5 times the size of a full moon.

I sent this image to my brother who doesn’t really have any interest in astronomy and he replied...

”wow! Is that where god lives!”

😂

Although I am pleased with this image, there are a few points that I would like to improve on, mainly the  clarity and colour of the stars, they are a bit bloated and were magenta at the end of integration so I ended up just desaturating them. The nebula was low in the sky when I started imaging and there was a wind so I lost a few subs and the sii wasn’t as sharp as I would have liked. 
 
it’s 17.5 hours in total, 5.5 hours Sii and Oiii and 6.5 hours Ha, all 30min subs shot over moonless nights with a revelation Astro ed100 f6 doublet with an atik 460ex and astrodon 5nm filters captured with Artemis capture, calibrated and integrated with APP than transferred to ps6 where I basically tried loads of things that I probably couldn’t reproduce in the same order again!! (Need to start keeping notes!) It’s a mixture of SHO with an HSO added in Lum, just a bit.

Anyway, thanks for looking I hope you like it. 

Bryan 
 

63703EAE-1286-4A4E-82FF-4852AFEC903F.jpeg

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1 minute ago, Brian Maurer said:

Fantastic image! Great detail and I really like the color.

Thanks Brian

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Just now, alan potts said:

Your hard to please, it is a superb image that I feel anyone would be happy with.

Alan

 

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It seems quite staggering that images like this and many, many others that I see on SGL can be accomplished by dedicated amateur astronomers without the aid of space ships, statelites and probes.

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3 hours ago, Nikolas74 said:

Yes !!! it's excellent !!!!!!! 

Thanks Nikolas! 
I am encouraged by your use of exclamation marks!! 
 

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3 hours ago, alan potts said:

You hard to please, it is a superb image that I feel anyone would be happy with.

Alan

Thanks for your kind words Alan, I am happy with the image, it’s probably is my best to date, I just know there is some loss in definition in the stars in NGC2244, and the stars have no colour, but it was time well spent. 

Cheers 

Bryan 

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3 hours ago, JOC said:

It seems quite staggering that images like this and many, many others that I see on SGL can be accomplished by dedicated amateur astronomers without the aid of space ships, statelites and probes.

Thanks JOC for your kind comment, you made me laugh out loud! (Where did I park my probe!) 

 I remember wondering how on Earth could you produce an image like that! And I still do, there are some amazingly talented people on this forum that produce images of exquisite quality and subtlety. 
 

Thanks again 

Bryan 

Edited by assouptro

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How is the colour in such images obtained?  Is it the application of coloured filters to generate an artificial colour range with a little 'poetic licence', or if you were close enough to the object and could look at it for long enough would those actual colours be present in 'real life' as it were.

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17 minutes ago, JOC said:

How is the colour in such images obtained?  Is it the application of coloured filters to generate an artificial colour range with a little 'poetic licence', or if you were close enough to the object and could look at it for long enough would those actual colours be present in 'real life' as it were.

Hi JOC

You are absolutely right, there is definitely more than a sprinkling of poetic license.

The image is a mixture of three separate filters, each filter isolates particular gas emissions, you can then assign a colour to that particular gas omission to achieve the desired result.

By the way, each individual stacked filtered  image is greyscale as the camera I use is a mono camera

So in conclusion, it is a false colour image but nevertheless the colours chosen help to isolate each gas emissions and enhances the contrast showing more detail and a “pretty picture” too

I hope that helps to explain.

Bryan

Edited by assouptro

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1 hour ago, assouptro said:

The image is a mixture of three separate filters, each filter isolates particular gas emissions, you can then assign a colour to that particular gas omission to achieve the desired result.

By the way, each individual stacked filtered  image is greyscale as the camera I use is a mono camera

So in conclusion, it is a false colour image but nevertheless the colours chosen help to isolate each gas emissions and enhances the contrast showing more detail and a “pretty picture” too

I hope that helps to explain.

That's an excellent explanation - thank you.  So part of the skill in this sort of thing is choosing colours that are complimentary to the desired effect of the artist.  Here you have an image that predominates in Umber/apricot/blue, but if I understand correctly you could just as easily chosen pink and purple or any other combination.  Thus, a number of images of the same area of space by different artists whilst all being of the same objects can all look different!  I think that makes it a lot of fun as a concept - You could almost imagine something like those pop-art image where you have a montage of the same image, but all done in different colours!

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37 minutes ago, JOC said:

That's an excellent explanation - thank you.  So part of the skill in this sort of thing is choosing colours that are complimentary to the desired effect of the artist.  Here you have an image that predominates in Umber/apricot/blue, but if I understand correctly you could just as easily chosen pink and purple or any other combination.  Thus, a number of images of the same area of space by different artists whilst all being of the same objects can all look different!  I think that makes it a lot of fun as a concept - You could almost imagine something like those pop-art image where you have a montage of the same image, but all done in different colours!

The pop art idea could be great fun! 
The colour palette often used is referred to as the Hubble palette as it was the colours used with many of the stunning images produced by the team at NASA as it helps enhance the gas distribution, this is often referred to as SHO, S = Sii H = Ha O = Oiii gas emissions in that order for Red, Green and Blue, but the colour green isn’t favoured for some reason and is often changed to a golden orange red colour that people find more pleasing. 

I’m glad you like it 

Bryan 

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nicely done !

There's a couple of cool features in there that don't often make it into Rosette pics:

Capture.PNG.63fb2088b4dd6008d992027dfb82c850.PNG

 

the smaller circled is a Herbig Haro object, Rosette HH1, they only discovered it in 2004 (https://www.noao.edu/outreach/press/pr04/pr0403.html).  You can see one jet but not the other.

The larger one is a so-called elephant's trunk - they are caused when a knot of heavy density gas is able to withstand the strong solar winds from the stars in the centre of the nebula better than the lower density gas around it and protects the gas behind it in its shadow, causing the pillar.  However, what's special about this one is the helical nature - magnetic field lines and electrical current flowing along the axis of the pillar have cause the material to swirl around it, creating those 4 or more intertwined helixes that you can just about make out

 

edit: you seem to have mirror-imaged it though, I knew there was something bugging me  😉

Edited by glowingturnip
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6 hours ago, glowingturnip said:

nicely done !

There's a couple of cool features in there that don't often make it into Rosette pics:

Capture.PNG.63fb2088b4dd6008d992027dfb82c850.PNG

 

the smaller circled is a Herbig Haro object, Rosette HH1, they only discovered it in 2004 (https://www.noao.edu/outreach/press/pr04/pr0403.html).  You can see one jet but not the other.

The larger one is a so-called elephant's trunk - they are caused when a knot of heavy density gas is able to withstand the strong solar winds from the stars in the centre of the nebula better than the lower density gas around it and protects the gas behind it in its shadow, causing the pillar.  However, what's special about this one is the helical nature - magnetic field lines and electrical current flowing along the axis of the pillar have cause the material to swirl around it, creating those 4 or more intertwined helixes that you can just about make out

 

edit: you seem to have mirror-imaged it though, I knew there was something bugging me  😉

Thanks for the information glowingturnip! 
That’s fascinating! And to think 2004! Wow! there is still stuff to discover!! 
oh, and yeah, sorry about the Mirrored image...6E444744-87E7-496D-B3D2-E9851AEFE93A.thumb.jpeg.78003c07920982eba03636ff6930eebf.jpeg

is that better? 
thanks again 

Bryan 

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34 minutes ago, celestron8g8 said:

Fantastic capture !

Thank you Celestron8g8

I’m glad you like it 😊

Bryan 

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6 hours ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Bryan,

Superb image, absolutely nothing about it I do not like, colour and detail are just great 🙂 

Steve

Steve, 

Thank you for your kind words and taking the time to comment. 😊

Bryan 

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This image certainly has the wow factor; someday in the distant future  I hope to be at this level. 

Nice work. 

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23 hours ago, steppenwolf said:

This is a wonderfully detailed image - very nice indeed!

Thanks steppenwolf for your kind words.

 I think if I process it again sometime, maybe if it stops raining and I can finally get more data, I think I would probably tone it down a tad to make it look a bit more natural. 

there are some fantastic subtle images on here that I find inspirational

Thanks again 

Bryan 

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