Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_30_second_exp_2_winners.thumb.jpg.b5430b40547c40d344fd4493776ab99f.jpg

Thalestris24

3D Printers

Recommended Posts

I have decided it is time to resurrect my weather station, for which I need to build a new Stevenson screen.  I was considering 3d-printing the walls, but in the end decided it was actually easier, cheaper and quicker to make them out of air vents.  I haven't decided if the front will fold down or open outwards yet, but I think I'm going to try 3d-printing the hinges.  Assuming they work, at least they won't corrode :)

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, JamesF said:

I have decided it is time to resurrect my weather station, for which I need to build a new Stevenson screen.  I was considering 3d-printing the walls, but in the end decided it was actually easier, cheaper and quicker to make them out of air vents.  I haven't decided if the front will fold down or open outwards yet, but I think I'm going to try 3d-printing the hinges.  Assuming they work, at least they won't corrode :)

James

You might need to consider what filament material you might use, James (Just a gut feeling - I know nothing!)

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have printed hinges successfully.  Simple ones though.  I made a Stevenson screen from wood many years ago well before 3D printing came along.  A new weather station is on my list of projects. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Gina said:

I have printed hinges successfully.  Simple ones though.  I made a Stevenson screen from wood many years ago well before 3D printing came along.  A new weather station is on my list of projects. 

I was  just wondering about which filament material would be ok out in all weathers?

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Thalestris24 said:

I was  just wondering about which filament material would be ok out in all weathers?

Louise

I don't think any plastic is 100% resistant to outdoor life, most will become brittle and faded in time (if colour was an issue) but I would choose PET for outdoor use personally. I think ABS is also fine but I just find PET easier to print than ABS.

PLA although nice and easy to print is not really suitable for prolonged outdoor use as it is not UV resistant, although could be painted I guess.

 

Steve

Edited by teoria_del_big_bang

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Thalestris24 said:

I was  just wondering about which filament material would be ok out in all weathers?

Louise

I also vote for PETG, as I had nasty PLA experience during a summer time....

Edited by RolandKol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the first instance I shall use PLA.  The door(s) of the screen will face north east so the hinges should never be in direct sunlight which might help.  If it turns out that they still degrade then I can replace them with something better.

James

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, RolandKol said:

I also vote for PETG, as I had nasty PLA experience in a summer time....

My question was more of a rhetorical one directed @JamesF but it's still interesting to hear the replies! Has anyone tried any of the mixed material filaments like carbon fibre? There is a US list of filament types here

Thanks

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Thalestris24 said:

My question was more of a rhetorical one directed @JamesF but it's still interesting to hear the replies! Has anyone tried any of the mixed material filaments like carbon fibre? There is a US list of filament types here

Thanks

Louise

For every used reel of carbon filled filament, you need about one new brass nozzle...🤨

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Chriske said:

For every used reel of carbon filled filament, you need about one new brass nozzle...🤨

You can get hardened steel nozzles :) 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Chriske said:

For every used reel of carbon filled filament, you need about one new brass nozzle...🤨

One thing that has stopped me trying carbon filled filaments. I have read some good reports of those who have used it and it is as strong as the proverbial ox but as you say a brass nozzle will not cut it and so on top of the expense of the filament you have to buy a Olsson Ruby Nozzle or at least a hardened steel nozzle.

A good guide to using it here:

Using Carbon Fibre Filled Filament

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't need much strength for hinges for a Stevenson screen so any plain filament will do.  White is best for outdoor use.

Edited by Gina
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do wonder how much of the PLA is unsuitable for outdoor use idea is perpetrated from misreading datasheets somewhere in history. Eg, did a chart show that PLA was the least stable under UV so its assumed that its unsuitable despite the variance being minor and it just being graded as the least stable. I confess to not looking up the data myself so cant say for sure.

I have now tried PLA, PLA+, ABS, PETG, CF & Wood and out of all of them PLA has been the simplest to print on all printers, for stuff that doesnt require absolute dimensional stability. It also has the added bonus of being the cheapest.

I try not to set opinions in stone unless I try something and have done enough outdoor PLA stuff now to really not be concerned about it at all. If I lived in a mediteranean climate then I might reconsider that but alas I do not :( My 3D printed pier adapter held up for over a year outdoors, no change in P.A, still going strong now if I wanted to use it again and only 30% infill. Thats with 20kg hanging of it.

 

I still think that 3D printing is for me geaered more toward rapid protyping than an actual production method, so if my use criteria demands long term outdoor use I have to consider that 3D printing isn't the best option for durability regardless of the material. Once you offset the practicality of a full production part vs "ill just reprint it if its ever an issue" its hardly worth bothering about. Just print in whatever you've got.

Of course if you have PET etc in stock, and you can print it then great - spec the best material for the job, im just saying if I was printing a weather station/outdoor mount/hinges etc I wouldnt be considering buying in a specific material just for that job if I had PLA to hand.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Gina said:

You don't need much strength for hinges for a Stevenson screen so any plain filament will do.  White is best for outdoor use.

I was thinking about durability but, yeah, you can just print out another set :)

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm I wonder if a clear UV varnish sprayed on printed parts would add a noticeable amount of protection without the need for different materials or changing the dimensions - its never going to give 100% but could help keep colour and provide some blocking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, upahill said:

Hmm I wonder if a clear UV varnish sprayed on printed parts would add a noticeable amount of protection without the need for different materials or changing the dimensions - its never going to give 100% but could help keep colour and provide some blocking.

Probably would be a good thing to do - varnish works great for other things! :)

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not tried any tests myself but my understanding is essentially PLA is biodegradable and from what I read (I agree no experience)  it is humidity and heat that will hasten the degrading.

But I tend to agree with @upahill to a large degree in that yes in this country the tendency to degrade will be a slow one. I seem to recall it is really temperatures approaching 40 degrees centigrade, and over several days, that are needed to actually biodegrade PLA in months rather than years, which seems unlikely.

Having said that as PET is just as easy to print as PLA (so long as you have a heated bed) and is about the same cost then personally I would choose PET for anything intended for prolonged outdoor use but PLA in the UK will I have no doubt last for several years unless we have a terrific heat wave (and I always live in hope).

So if you already have PLA in abundance and do not want to go down the PET route then I would see no big issue at least for several years to come 🙂 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, CedricTheBrave said:

I am beginning to think I really need a 3D printer!

 

Glad I bought mine last week :) There are lots of things I could use it for that would be difficult to do otherwise. As well as printing out others' designs, I'm looking forward to letting out the designer in me and getting to grips with Autodesk Fusion 360 :) 

Louise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

... as easy to print as PLA (so long as you have a heated bed) and is about the same cost ...

Im a cheapskate so rarely spend more than £10-£12 a kg for my PLA delivered. Would love to find a supplier of PET around that price, if I could I would probably switch over to it completely too.

Perhaps its time to stop scrimping and dial in the printer for PET instead, there are a few brands on Amazon that are around the £18-£24 p/kg mark so not as massive jump. Last time I looked it was hard to find for < £30

 

One of my main struggles was with the heated bed, but I have upgraded to a mains voltage bed heater now so hopefully that will be more consistent and give me better results than last time I tried. Also I think my last PET test was before I had the e3d genuine so that could have been giving me grief too.

7 minutes ago, CedricTheBrave said:

I am beginning to think I really need a 3D printer!

They are great fun, and mesmerizing to watch work - have lost hours in a meditative trance watching designs come to life. 🙂

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Chriske said:

The links shows 2.2 kg reels.
I use it all the time, and I'm not the only one on this forum if I'm not mistaken.

https://colorfabb.com/filaments/pla-filaments/pla-economy

and also

https://colorfabb.com/filaments/co-polyesters-filaments/petg-economy

Oooh do like the idea of an 8kg reel :) And £19 p/kg delivered isnt going to break the bank either.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This talk about PLA being used outdoors has really sent me on a mission to see what causes the degrade as it is now confusing me.

Why is it so unsuitable according to what information is out there?

I had always read on 3D printing forums and websites that if PLA is to be used outside then paint it to protect it. Now I had always thought this was to prevent it degrading due to sunlight (which eventually attacks all plastics to some degree - surely it is not just me that sits on old plastic garden chairs and they shatter throwing me to the ground and everybody else laughing 🙂 ). But the more I read I now think the paint is to prevent moisture ingress. 

I believe all plastics will absorb some moisture (hence why we should store in airtight plastic vacuum bags or similar) but PLA is possibly worse than others. And because PLA is made from natural bio products such as corn, potato and rice that will cause it to decay more rapidly.

So probably the varnish even though clear will work almost as effectively as paint?

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, upahill said:

Im a cheapskate so rarely spend more than £10-£12 a kg for my PLA delivered. Would love to find a supplier of PET around that price, if I could I would probably switch over to it completely too.

Wow where do you get this from? I must admit I have quite a collection of PLA and so not ordered any for sometime but I think the cheapest I found was around £15 on Amazon.

And Cheapskate, don't forget I am a Yorkshireman you don't get more cheapskate than that, we have a reputation to uphold you know 🙂 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chriske said:

The links shows 2.2 kg reels.
I use it all the time, and I'm not the only one on this forum if I'm not mistaken.

https://colorfabb.com/filaments/pla-filaments/pla-economy

and also

https://colorfabb.com/filaments/co-polyesters-filaments/petg-economy

I use the same!  Great filament - I have Chris to thank for putting me onto this supplier.  I even have an 8Kg reel of white PLA to use with my Giant printer.  Takes some lifting, I tell you!! 🤣   Also, every so often colorFabb have sales with 20-25% off - time to stock up.  I seem to get through quite a lot of filament as I prototype and make astro stuff etc. and getting close to finishing a 4.5Kg reel of white PLA in my Concorde printer.

Edited by Gina
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.