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7 posts in this topic

Thanks for this, I generally follow this workflow in Startools but there are some tweaks in there that I will try out.

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I'm a big startools fan but I still got some new ideas from reading that.  Thanks for posting!

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Thanks for the info. Knew nothing about binning and this has really speed up processing for me. Really has pushed me in the right direction.

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Thanks for that link. :thumbsup:

was just looking at startools and wondering what would be involved

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I like Guy's single function explanations in the startools forum goes that little bit deeper. The more I use it the easier I understand it.

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      --------------
       
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    • By mike005
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      ( please click / tap on image to see it larger and sharper )
      ....
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      ( click on image to see larger and clearer ( grrr... image compression in version above  ))
      ----------
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      ---------
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      ( click tap on image to see larger and sharper )
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      NGC 2014    ( upper right, pink) size 30 x 20 arcmin   Mag +8.
      NGC 2020    size 2.0 arcmin   
      NGC 2030    ( lower right, blue ).
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      NGC 2035   size 3.0 x 3.0   arcmin   
      NGC 2040   size 3.0 x 3.0   arcmin   
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      NGC 2006   size 1    arcmin   Mag +11.5
      NGC 2011   size 1    arcmin   Mag +10.6
      NGC 2021   size 0.9    arcmin   Mag +12.1
      NGC 2027   size 0.7    arcmin   Mag +11.9
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      NGC 2041   size 0.7    arcmin   Mag +10.4
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      link: 500px.com/MikeODay