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 It's still a work in progress and incomplete, but I wanted to share my latest observing project.

 In 2016, when Mars was so low from the UK that it was bouncing off the roof tops, I had was able to make around 36 sketches using my then FC100DC, showing the northern hemisphere detail. Some of you may remember the 5" Mars globe that I made depicting the telescopic prism reversed view of that year.  After the more recent apparition with Mars being much larger and better placed for observing, I was able to make many detailed observations of the southern hemisphere using an FC100DZ. Essentially identical telescopes for planetary observing!  Below is the Mars globe I'm working on showing the combined detail from both apparitions, and although not finished, its beginning to take shape. Again, the globe depicts the prism reversed view as seen through the refractor, and so makes an easy reference for use at the telescope.

The globe is made from an 8" stainless steel ball, bought from a garden centre.

IMG_20210412_083015.thumb.jpg.cf680181770ee85cdb82098c520e683c.jpgIMG_20210412_083041.thumb.jpg.68151f658372b4e28d893f3f174c998d.jpgIMG_20210412_083029.thumb.jpg.c89e3dc8be146710bf59181519051664.jpg

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The ingenuity of SGL members never fails to impress me! Do you intend to "finish" it, or will it be an ongoing "work in progress" to be updated at each apparition?

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7 minutes ago, Marki said:

The ingenuity of SGL members never fails to impress me! Do you intend to "finish" it, or will it be an ongoing "work in progress" to be updated at each apparition?

Thankyou Marki!  That's a really good question. I may add to it during future apparitions but I'm not certain. It's probably a better idea than making more globe's as I'm running out of room to display them. 

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Mike that looks amazing! Would you mind explaining how you put this together?

 

It is one thing to sketch on paper but it is an order of magnitude more complex on a spherical surface - especially a steel surface!

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ShrewView said:

Wow that's pretty incredible. 

How do you add the markings to the steel?

Thankyou ShrewView & Mark,

 After drilling the globe to feed a steel rod through to attach the globe to the base, I was able to hang the globe from a wire and spray paint it. Once dried, I simply position the major features from my sketches on their respective meridians, then using a cotton bud to rub graphite onto the paint, giving a soft telescopic appeal. A putty rubber removes excess graphite and sharpens edges. After that, to seal the graphite I spray the globe with clear gloss lacquer.  I've yet to spray on the polar caps and perhaps label the features.

Edited by mikeDnight
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53 minutes ago, MarkRadice said:

Wow, you make it sound so simple! How do you correct for the distortion for the globe or do you simply align by eye?

 

I try to make enough observations during an apperition so as to view all features on or as close as possible to the central meridian. Of course it's not always possible to catch everything so accurately placed from a sketch, but it is relatively easy to link features together if the majority are placed reasonably accurately. 

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Thank you for your quick reply. I can understand those features near the equator but what about those feature near the polar regions?  I do wonder, having admired your globe again, if I am overthinking the problem!

I know what you mean! Mars, was great this season although I can't wait for 2022 when both Mars and Jupiter will be putting on a fine show.

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1 hour ago, MarkRadice said:

Thank you for your quick reply. I can understand those features near the equator but what about those feature near the polar regions?  I do wonder, having admired your globe again, if I am overthinking the problem!

I know what you mean! Mars, was great this season although I can't wait for 2022 when both Mars and Jupiter will be putting on a fine show.

The polar regions are more difficult but by combining the 2016 observations, where the northern hemisphere was tilted toward us, with last year's southern hemisphere display, its just a matter of carefully linking the features. Then there's the variation in the size of the polar caps to consider. I'm still thinking about that one!

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5 hours ago, mikeDnight said:

 It's still a work in progress and incomplete, but I wanted to share my latest observing project.

 In 2016, when Mars was so low from the UK that it was bouncing off the roof tops, I had was able to make around 36 sketches using my then FC100DC, showing the northern hemisphere detail. Some of you may remember the 5" Mars globe that I made depicting the telescopic prism reversed view of that year.  After the more recent apparition with Mars being much larger and better placed for observing, I was able to make many detailed observations of the southern hemisphere using an FC100DZ. Essentially identical telescopes for planetary observing!  Below is the Mars globe I'm working on showing the combined detail from both apparitions, and although not finished, its beginning to take shape. Again, the globe depicts the prism reversed view as seen through the refractor, and so makes an easy reference for use at the telescope.

The globe is made from an 8" stainless steel ball, bought from a garden centre.

IMG_20210412_083015.thumb.jpg.cf680181770ee85cdb82098c520e683c.jpgIMG_20210412_083041.thumb.jpg.68151f658372b4e28d893f3f174c998d.jpgIMG_20210412_083029.thumb.jpg.c89e3dc8be146710bf59181519051664.jpg

Excellent Mike.  Of course, I've seen your previous globes, indeed you were kind enough to make me one from a previous apparition.

Every time I look at mine on my book shelf, it reminds me of being at Lowell Observatory, many years ago.  In the Rotunda building, at least when I went, there was a long line of Lowellian globes he had made at successive oppositions on a shelf running round part of the wall.  It gave me a great thrill to see Lowell's globes that he had made himself.

I have to say, your globes are nearly as impressive, though perhaps you haven't the same kudos that Lowell has (not yet anyway!) - also you tend to have fewer canals on your globes than he had 😄.

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I'm really glad you like your Mars globe so much Paul. But i didnt know Lowell used Kudos. I use the more common place Old Spice. 😀 I don't know how many Mars apparitions I have left, but perhaps I'll see enough to knock out a few more globes. And may be they'll be passed on to other Mars enthusiasts in time. I'd love one of Lowell's globe's, or even just to see them in the flesh. And even though he saw things that weren't actually there in the form of his many canals, I still greatly respect his enthusiasm, and the passion for Mars that he passed on to others. I wonder what the world of astronomy would be like without the influence of Percival Lowell?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Fantastic project Mike, what a wonderful way to bring your observations to life. Please keep away from small children. 🙂

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I agree with everyone else, a very novel record of Mars apparitions. Like Paul, it reminds me of a bygone age of great visual observers, Percival Lowell among others. Well done Mike.

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On 02/05/2021 at 21:26, BRADLEY 1953 said:

I agree with everyone else, a very novel record of Mars apparitions. Like Paul, it reminds me of a bygone age of great visual observers, Percival Lowell among others. Well done Mike.

I think that the globe should be pretty much finished once the polar caps are filled in.

Like you said, it has that look and feel of the bygone era of Lowell and I think,  is all the better for it. 

If I had the space for it, it would take a prominent place for display because I love it. 

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