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Hi, this is my first time using my new Esprit 100ED, my first time processing using Pixinsight, and it's my first image using a Mono + filters.

 

I loved them, can't wait to try on more targets.

 

here's the result:

spacer.png

 

 

Equipments:

SkyWatcher Esprit 100ED

SkyWatcher EQ6-R

SkyWatcher EvoGuide 50ED Guidescope

Imaging cam ZWO ASI1600MM Cool Pro

ZWO EFW

ZWO LRGB+NB 36mm filters

Guiding cam ZWO ASI290MM Mini

 

Seeing was avarage

Location was in a Green Zone

 

Exposures:

Ha 11x1800sec

L 39x300sec

R 13x300sec

G 15x300sec

B 15x300sec

Darks:

24x300sec

10x1800sec

Bias:

70

 

 

Thanks

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  • 4 months later...

Hi,  I know this is oldish thread but I am looking at buying a Sky-Watcher Esprit 100 ED PRO but was worried that I would need to upgrade to 2" filters. I say this because it states that when imaging this scope gives a 40mm diameter imaging circle when used with the flattener. So forgive my ignorance but does this mean I need bigger than 40mm filters. I too have only 36mm unmounted filters and filter wheel similar to you.

Nice image by the way that really makes me want to get one of these.

Steve

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 19/09/2019 at 18:40, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Hi,  I know this is oldish thread but I am looking at buying a Sky-Watcher Esprit 100 ED PRO but was worried that I would need to upgrade to 2" filters. I say this because it states that when imaging this scope gives a 40mm diameter imaging circle when used with the flattener. So forgive my ignorance but does this mean I need bigger than 40mm filters. I too have only 36mm unmounted filters and filter wheel similar to you.

Nice image by the way that really makes me want to get one of these.

Steve

Sorry it took me a long time to notice your reply, I think (and I'm not an expert) you only need to upgrade your filters when you have a large camera sensor.

the Esprit 100 ED allows you to reach 40mm (which is good) but you are not required to upgrade unless your camera sensor is huge.

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