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Found 11 results

  1. In my moderately light-polluted skies, I've been hunting for this galaxy for several nights in a row. Was starting to doubt I'd ever see it. Finally, guided by Stellarium (double-flipped so it matches what I see in the finderscope), I managed to find the right patch of sky. Absolutely no trace of the galaxy in either finderscope, or main scope, but in a 30 second exposure of the DSLR, I finally made out a fuzzy blob. Thrilling moment, I have to say! (I guess that's why we do what we do...). Sadly, I had to rush to get just 10 x 2 minute subs before the clouds came in, but I'm totally inspired and waiting for the next clear night to do a better job. (Skywatcher 200P, EQ5 GoTo mount unguided, Canon 450D ISO 800, 10 x 2min subs, 8 x darks, no flats) Seeing the spiral arms emerge in the longer subs was a first for me - I'm convinced with 32 subs (maybe pushing out to 3 minute exposures) - I'll get a lot more detail and colour. Any suggestions for my next session? The vignetting was something crazy, so I'm certainly taking flats next time.
  2. Having started capturing data for this in Feb, I was beginning to think I'd never finish it with the awful weather of the last 2 months. However, this week has finally yielded some clear nights so I've managed to cobble enough together for an image, and in time for the end date of this challenge. Optics: MN190 Camera: 460ex Guiding: Orion mini guidescope + QHY5L-ii L: 21x600s RGB: 3x7x600s Ha: 10x500s
  3. Left the scope running over night on his one when we had that cold snap, managed 42x10min luminance subs, added to some old 2x2 binned RGB data. This is a crop of the centre of the image to show off the galaxy detail a bit better. Pleased with this, although I might try a re-process when I’m not so tired. Atik 383L+ mono, 190MN, LRGB Baader filters thanks for looking.
  4. Had a good night last night: M101 Pinwheel Galaxy and M66 Leo Triplet Both 20 x 180s Light, 20 Flats, PHD2 guiding using Altair GP-CAM, Nikon D3200 prime focus I didn't notice the cover wasn't fully on so the darks were spoiled, so will have to do them again once the temp is down to -1C tonight. This will help the re-processing to reduce the noise and there are hot pixels in there. But I'm happy with the light frames.
  5. Aenima

    M33 2nd Try

    From the album: The next step.

    I wanted to try again on this for a while now, a gap in the clouds recently gave me the chance although it was literally twenty minutes: 19 x 60sec subs with calibration frames taken indoors. Quite surprised with the image for such a short exposure time.

    © Aenima

  6. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    Messier 101 - Pinwheel Galaxy Taken with reasonable seeing and the best guiding I have managed to date. I still need to get the guiding better but we are getting there. This is in monochrome only as I used a Skywatcher Clear Sky filter to deal with the light pollution. I'm very pleased with the end result all things considered. If you wnat more detail, the astrobin link is: http:// http://www.astrobin.com/247272/
  7. The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy ( Messier 83, NGC 5236 ) in the constellation Hydra. ( click on image to see fuill size ) Messier 83 is a relatively large and bright spiral galaxy visible from southern and mid latitudes. Clearly visible is the central bar with its bright central bulge as well as multiple dark dust lanes and areas of nebulosity in the sweeping arms. At a distance of 15 Million light years, the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, whilst close in astronomical terms, is too far away and hence way too small for my backyard telescope to resolve individual stars; so all of the stars that can be seen are in fact in the near foreground of the image and reside, like us, in the Milkyway Galaxy. Much harder to see are the many far more distant galaxies that look like tiny fuzzy stars in the image. The easiest of which are PGC 724536 and PGC 48132 that appear close together in the centre of the image just to the right of Messier 83. Both are edge on and look like tiny flying saucers. Details: Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2 software. Nikon D5300 (unmodified) Hutech IDAS D1 filter, 14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on. 25 June 2016. 17 x 4min ISO400 Pixinsight and photoshop. Links: https://500px.com/mikeoday http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay
  8. Jonk

    M101 Pinwheel Galaxy

    From the album: Jon's images

    M101 Pinwheel Galaxy, 2h25m total, 47 lights mostly 180s each, 47 darks, 10 flats, 10 dark flats, 10 bias, EOS 1100D Baader modified, Astronomik CLS filter, Skywatcher 150P on an HEQ5 Pro mount, PHD guiding. Taken from my back garden in Southsea on Thursday the 26th of March 2015, waxing crescent moon, about 25% illuminated. Quite windy too!
  9. From the album: Deep Sky Objects

    Equipment Celestron AVX with Polar Scope Celestron Evolution 8 OTA with 0.63 Focal Reducer ZWO Off Axis Guider with ZWO ASI185mc Guidecam ZWO Mini Electronic Filter Wheel ZWO ASI1600mm-c Acquisition Software - Sequence Generator Pro 30 x 120s (1 Hours) Luminance 1x1 - Unity Gain / 0 offset 10 x 120s (20 mins) Red 2x2 - Unity Gain / 0 offset 10 x 120s (20 mins) Green 2x2 - Unity Gain / 0 offset 10 x 120s (20 mins) Blue 2x2 - Unity Gain / 0 offset Total exposure time 2 hours. Stacking Pixinsight Post-Processing Pixinsight

    © Jason Brookbanks

  10. The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy ( Messier 83, NGC 5236 ) in the constellation Hydra. Additional sub-images added ( 9 x 3 min @ ISO 200, no filter ) and colour balance tweaked to remove slight yellow/green tinge. The lower ISO and removal of the LP pollution filter has made it easier to bring out the subtle colours in the stars. ( click on image to see fuill size ) Messier 83 is a relatively large and bright spiral galaxy visible from southern and mid latitudes. Clearly visible is the central bar with its bright central bulge as well as multiple dark dust lanes and areas of nebulosity in the sweeping arms. At a distance of 15 Million light years, the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, whilst close in astronomical terms, is too far away and hence way too small for my backyard telescope to resolve individual stars; so all of the stars that can be seen are in fact in the near foreground of the image and reside, like us, in the Milkyway Galaxy. Much harder to see are the many far more distant galaxies that look like tiny fuzzy stars in the image. The easiest of which are PGC 724536 and PGC 48132 that appear close together in the centre of the image just to the right of Messier 83. Both are edge on and look like tiny flying saucers. Details: Skywatcher Quattro 10" f4 Newtonian. Skywatcher AZ Eq6 GT Mount Orion 80mm f5 guide scope and auto guider - PHD2 software. Nikon D5300 (unmodified) 14bit NEF, Long Exp. NR on. 25 June 2016 - Hutech IDAS D1 filter, 17 x 4 min @ ISO 400 28 June 2016 - no filter, 9 x 3 min @ ISO 200 Pixinsight and photoshop. Links: https://500px.com/mikeoday http://photo.net/photos/MikeODay Edited June 27 by mike005
  11. Here's my homage to galaxy season: 13x600s lum plus 12x900s lum, 24x180s each of R, G and B and 12x180s Ha used for chrominance only. Taken over 2 nights on 21st and 22nd March. Equipment as per sig, processed in Pixinsight (Cross-posted to the Galaxy competition forum). Capturing was a little fraught. On the first night things were fine, found a nice guide-star with the galaxy right in the middle of the frame and good guiding all night. However, the second night, with the galaxy in almost exactly the same position and orientation, but I just could not find a guide-star in my OAG. By the time I found one, the galaxy was way off centre, and I had to do some fancy footwork in processing to merge the two sets. Thankfully, I don't think you can see the join... I was amazed at the number of faint fuzzies in the background, so I made this collage taken from the uncropped image. I don't think I got them all either, there are loads of very faint objects in the pic that don't quite look like star profiles: This was my first attempt at this target. Which one do you prefer ? The Pinwheel Galaxy (M101) is a face-on spiral galaxy 21 million light-years away from earth in the constellation Ursa Major. M101 is a large galaxy, comparable in size to the Milky Way with a diameter of 170,000 light-years. It has a disk mass on the order of 100 billion solar masses, along with a small central bulge of about 3 billion solar masses. M101 is noted for its high population of H II regions, the pinkish areas in this image, many of which are very large and bright. H II regions usually accompany the enormous clouds of high density molecular hydrogen gas contracting under their own gravitational force where stars form. H II regions are ionized by large numbers of extremely bright and hot young stars, those in M101 are capable of creating hot superbubbles. M101 is asymmetrical due to the tidal forces from interactions with its companion galaxies. These gravitational interactions compress interstellar hydrogen gas, which then triggers strong star formation activity in M101's spiral arms. It is in the M101 group of galaxies, distinct from our own Local Group, but also a member of the Virgo Supercluster of galaxies. The Virgo Supercluster contains at least 100 galaxy groups including our own, and is one of about 10 million superclusters in the observable universe. Comments and cc welcome, hope you enjoy ! Stuart
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