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The Cat's Paw Nebula ( NGC 6334 ) in Scorpius 

updated ( slight tweak to colour balance, a little brighter and tad more contrast )  

EFF0DE9F-B3B8-4DB9-B893-3B42F22F1932.thumb.jpeg.7623bdad86af26989ed5a4453e0bc4c1.jpeg

please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here )

......

original:

991242490_NGC6334-CatsPawNebula(2732x1857px)-compressed.thumb.jpg.dc78de62313119ceab07df14d5a71e34.jpg

( please click / tap on image to see larger and sharper - a full size image can be seen here )

……………………...

Also known as the Bear Claw Nebula, NGC 6334 is an emission nebula near the scorpion's tail in the Scorpius constellation. 

Image details:

Image centre ...... RA: 17 20 08.185  Dec: -35 52 30.91
Field of view ..... 57' 37.8" x 38' 51.8"
Rotation .......... 0.00 deg ( North is up )
Resolution ........ 0.586 arcsec/px

Telescope: Orion Optics CT12 Newtonian ( mirror 300mm, fl 1200mm, f4 ).
Corrector: ASA 2" Coma Corrector Quattro 1.175x.
Effective Focal Length / Aperture : 1470mm f4.7

Mount: Skywatcher EQ8
Guiding: TSOAG9 Off-Axis-Guider, Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2, PHD2 

Camera:
Nikon D5300 (unmodified) (sensor 23.5 x 15.6mm, 6016x4016 3.9um pixels)

Location:
Blue Mountains, Australia 
Moderate light pollution ( pale green zone on darksitefinder.com map )

Capture ( July 2018 )
6 sets of sub-images with exposure duration for each set doubling ( 4s to 240s ) all at ISO 250.
168 x 4 min frames plus ~10 frames each for the shorter exposures  

Processing:
Calibration: bias, dark and flat
Integration in 8 sets
HDR combination 

Pixinsight July 2018

Edited by MikeODay
Image updated
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Very nice.  For obvious reasons am not intimately acquainted with this target.

Carole 

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Cheers Carole - yes I imagine that it is quite low in the sky for you!

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Wonderful.  I am wondering if a slight drop in black point would bring out the details a bit.  Its great as is though.

Rodd

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On 26/07/2018 at 01:30, Rodd said:

Wonderful.  I am wondering if a slight drop in black point would bring out the details a bit.  Its great as is though.

Rodd

Thanks Rodd

Here is a further tweak.  What do you think, better or have I over done it?

E27746AC-9EE4-4021-861E-D6328CB0ED1C.thumb.jpeg.2199bbf1181901c4d01c9bb202efaf0f.jpeg

Cheers

Mike

 

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9 minutes ago, MikeODay said:

Here is a further tweak.  What do you think, better or have I over done it?

I think it looks good.  You did not over do it at all.  The structures stand out a bit.  Nice.

Rodd

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15 minutes ago, Rodd said:

I think it looks good.  You did not over do it at all.  The structures stand out a bit.  Nice.

Rodd

Thanks Rodd.

I find it hard sometimes to set the right contrast - I calibrate my monitor for colour but the contrast is very different between my monitor and IPAD.

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2 minutes ago, MikeODay said:

 

Thanks Rodd.

I find it hard sometimes to set the right contrast - I calibrate my monitor for colour but the contrast is very different between my monitor and IPAD.

I know what you mean.  I find the im ages look their best on iphones and ipads.  Something about the screens.  Maybe being smaller helps too.

Rodd

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updated ( slight tweak to colour balance, a little brighter and tad more contrast )  

E91E9D12-0263-42A2-9649-E4C2DC2E43EE.thumb.jpeg.c7a850b01ae07089d1c36ba66f3ce355.jpeg

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Thats look heaps good.. WAY WAY better than what I ended up with last time I tried imaging this nebula.... well done.

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On 31/07/2018 at 20:03, MarsG76 said:

Thats look heaps good.. WAY WAY better than what I ended up with last time I tried imaging this nebula.... well done.

Thanks for that!  I am quite pleased with the way it turned out.   

Although ...

The colour balance was a challenge and I'm still not sure it is "correct" - the problem I had is that there is no neutral area that I could use as a reference to remove the light pollution.  Even the dark areas are really red!

Also, looking at other deep images, I think that the blue tint at the far left  is not due to reflection of blue star light from interstellar material :) - I think it is probably due to the very strong stretch of the dark tones bringing out atmospheric flare from the bright star just out of frame - there must have been more dust/vapour in the air than I thought; it looked clear!

Cheers

Mike

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4 hours ago, MikeODay said:

Thanks for that!  I am quite pleased with the way it turned out.   

Although ...

The colour balance was a challenge and I'm still not sure it is "correct" - the problem I had is that there is no neutral area that I could use as a reference to remove the light pollution.  Even the dark areas are really red!

Also, looking at other deep images, I think that the blue tint at the far left  is not due to reflection of blue star light from interstellar material :) - I think it is probably due to the very strong stretch of the dark tones bringing out atmospheric flare from the bright star just out of frame - there must have been more dust/vapour in the air than I thought; it looked clear!

Cheers

Mike

Very dense in Nebulosity, that's for sure, although with the blue, it looks like it convexes into a point so I doubt that it's atmospheric haze dispersion, I this that it's the result of star light... 

Either way, it looks great.

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On 02/08/2018 at 15:37, MarsG76 said:

Very dense in Nebulosity, that's for sure, although with the blue, it looks like it convexes into a point so I doubt that it's atmospheric haze dispersion, I this that it's the result of star light... 

Either way, it looks great.

Thanks for that.

Cheers

Mike

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