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Rodd

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Rodd last won the day on November 14

Rodd had the most liked content!

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3,751 Excellent

2 Followers

About Rodd

  • Rank
    Red Dwarf

Contact Methods

  • Yahoo
    rodddryfoos@yahoo.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astrophotography, music, the wilderness
  • Location
    CT
  1. Rodd

    a small galaxy, and a big nebula

    CA Nebula looks fantastic. I think the galaxy could use a bit less NC to be honest. But I like the scale. i have a C11Edge too and am looking forward to trying it on this babey. Rodd
  2. Rodd

    Iris Nebula

    Looks like I want to reach out and pluck it from the screen. Well done. If you don't mind some CC--there is a greenish cast to portions of the background dust on my monitor. Only bhave access to this one at this time so I can't check on another. Maybe it's my monitor. Rodd
  3. Rodd

    Horsehead Nebula

    Not bad at all. You have some fine detail. And it's not overly noisy for the limited data. Rodd
  4. Rodd

    Crab Nebula (M1)

    That's the mark of a good image when it can stand up to a serious crop...like yours. I had to crop mine too to see it well--and I was shooting at 1000mm. I think I will use the C11Edge and really try and get this thing caught. Very inspirational...thank you! Rodd
  5. Thanks, Barry--will give it a go. I never thought I wanted to look at Mel 15 again, let alone shoot it. But your image has me hungry for it again. Rodd
  6. That is a GREAT image! Yes...definitely. the stars look natural. This target is so star rich that sometimes they get in the way. But you have managed to portray a lot of them, but in a way that looks natural--lots of different sizes and not all just bright dots. I would very much like to be able to view this at full resolution--but alas, you downsized it f0or posting. Not necessary--you have a very good image here--it could easily--it would easily stand up to full resolution, I am sure! Rodd
  7. Nice! I like that combo--the 71 and the 460. The small pixels really boost the resolution, which is apparent in the level of detail you managed to capture in the dark structures. This nebula has a lot of details, but the contrast in the main body isn't that great, so they are hard to bring out. It took me 30 hours at F4.3 to start seeing some detail. With more data the ridges and escarpments of Mount Crumpet will start to show. You might even catch the Grinch! Rodd
  8. Rodd

    Circle of Life

    I need a 10 TB hard drive!
  9. Rodd

    Sh2-140 and Lynds 2304

    I might not be articulating this very well. I mean--you can insert high-resolution data into a wide FOV image, only affecting the high-resolution region while preserving the large FOV with the wide filed, lower resolution. Take a wide field shot of the Bubble Nebula region for instance. Some folks shoot a wide FOV with a 71mm scope, then insert data for the bubble itself shot with a 17" Planewave CDK. This gives you a big FOV with the Bubble looking like a higher resolution region upon zoom. Rodd
  10. Rodd

    Sh2-140 and Lynds 2304

    You have the option of shooting a widefield with the 100 then supplementing high detail/structural areas with the 150. Its done all the time--Olly does it quite often (but this is what I do not know how to do). Rodd
  11. Rodd

    Sh2-140 and Lynds 2304

    But this means that the larger FOV data is being put into the smaller FOV data. I want to put smaller FOV data (higher resolution) into larger FOV data--you know supplement key areas with higher resolution data. The problem is the higher resolution data is a smaller FOV--so I don't know how to do this in PI Rodd
  12. Rodd

    Sh2-140 and Lynds 2304

    Yes--Now I see. It could be a screen thing too--monitors are all different. How do you combine different focal lengths? Whenever I try, the smaller FOV always gets the data--so a shorter FL will be put into the longer FL--which is the opposite of what you want for increased resolution. Rodd
  13. Rodd

    Sh2-240 Single Pane, 6 x 1200s Ha

    You actually got allot of signal there. Nice job. This will fill out nicely with more data. Rodd
  14. The best Melotte 15 I have seen. I tried this at .78 arcsec/pix and it came out softer than an attempt at 2.46 arcsec/pix. Never understood that. Had allot of data to. How do you do a starless in PI? Rodd
  15. Rodd

    Sh2-140 and Lynds 2304

    Interesting target Goran I am not familiar with it. It kind of looks like an inverted Christmas Tree Cluster--very cone nebula-ish ( only the stars). Without knowing, I f I had to guess, I would think this was shot at a long focal length--I guess the 150 is fairly long--but not much over 1000mm right? If the central dark region is what you are referring to as a foreground dark nebula--it looks more like background space--maybe clipped a tad? More data will resolve this issue. Rodd
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