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Ceph and Cass

Longest day , nights draw in !


cotterless45
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Hurrah ! Over the hump of long light evenings, soon be observing at 4.30. Bring on Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Orion.

By the way the fools at Stonehenge are 6 months early, built to celebrate the return of the Sun midwinter. Still any excuse to be made up and take some kit off......

Nick.

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"noon astronomers" they are probably doing solar observing and so want as much day light as they can get. :eek: :eek:

Don't you love typo's ? :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin: :grin:

Edited by ronin
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According to my big book of boys astronomical facts, it won't get astronomically dark until 31st July, and even then you only get some 20 mins at 1am...

Astronomically dark is when the sun is more than 12 degrees below the horizon.

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Hurrah ! Over the hump of long light evenings, soon be observing at 4.30. Bring on Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Orion.

By the way the fools at Stonehenge are 6 months early, built to celebrate the return of the Sun midwinter. Still any excuse to be made up and take some kit off......

Nick.

Well, getting one's kit off during a long winter solstice night probbaly has less appeal...

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Nope!!

This might be the longest day but it is not the day of the latest sunset. We can't calculate sunset to the nearest second for various reasons but sunset is listed at 21:32 for the nights of 22nd June to 27th June. So the point of the sunset starting to be earlier ( if only by a few seconds ) is around 24th -25th June.

Due to the vagaries of the Earth's orbit the earliest times of Sunrise occur at 04:43 between June 11th and 22nd. Latest Sunset and earliest Sunrise times only overlap on one day, 22nd June!

So your mornings are starting to become darker after tomorrow but you will have to wait 3-4 more days for the evenings to follow suit.

( All times are for London. )

According to my big book of boys astronomical facts, it won't get astronomically dark until 31st July, and even then you only get some 20 mins at 1am...

Astronomically dark is when the sun is more than 12 degrees below the horizon.

Astronomical Twilight is when the Sun is between 12 and 18 degrees below the horizon. It is not true dark until the Sun is down 18 degrees.

Civil twilight is 0-6 degrees dip and Nautical twilight is 6 -12 degrees dip.

Nigel

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According to Stellarium, at my location 62N the sun will be over 12 degrees below the horizon on August 10'th & over 18 degrees on August 28'th. I never really thought about how bright the sky is during the summer until I bought a telescope & started observing & imaging last year, now I really miss the stars during the summer months! :(

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Hurrah ! Over the hump of long light evenings, soon be observing at 4.30. Bring on Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Orion.

By the way the fools at Stonehenge are 6 months early, built to celebrate the return of the Sun midwinter. Still any excuse to be made up and take some kit off......

Nick.

It will be a while til we can observe those, but bring it on. I dont mean to wish the summer away, but we are over the hump.

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I haven't had the scope out for a couple of months now, by the time it's dark enough I'm too tired to stay up :shocked:

As Paul says we don't want to wish the summer away but those early dark evenings do give us something to look forward to. There's a saying that the devil finds work for idle hands, and this period of inactivity does tend to lead to ideas of upgrade and improvements which inevitably lead to more expense. Having said that, with the summers we've had of late, winter can't come too soon :grin:

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On the plus side the light nights and lack of observing gave me opportunity to do some scope modifications that might not otherwise have happened. I'm taking the primary mirror cell of my 8" Newtonian and flocking the inside of the tube today.

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On the plus side the light nights and lack of observing gave me opportunity to do some scope modifications that might not otherwise have happened. I'm taking the primary mirror cell of my 8" Newtonian and flocking the inside of the tube today.

Good idea, been considering flocking my telescope as well. :)

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I just came on the PC to make this exact post!

I really feel like I'm over the hump this weekend. Can't wait for the nights to come back so I can get back out there.

I accumulated all of my gear as the days were getting longer so am champing at the bit to get going again.

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