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BinocularSky

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BinocularSky last won the day on March 1 2013

BinocularSky had the most liked content!

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About BinocularSky

  • Rank
    White Dwarf

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    http://http:/binocularsky.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Visual astronomy (obviously), Kites, AmDram.
  • Location
    Between the New Forest and Cranborne Chase
  1. Ah, thanks for that, Dave. I wonder. Mine's a Galaxy S7. I don't really want to upgrade a phone that is still perfectly serviceable for everything else I use it for. (I'm happy enough star-hopping anyway .) Also, just noticed the FAH notice in your sig. Just signed up and joined team SGL. What a good idea!
  2. (from http://www.kasai-trading.jp/widebino28e.html)
  3. I use a Rigel QuikFinder - the outer circle is 2*, very close to the 1.8* of my 37x eyepieces; makes star-hopping a doddle. I look through (and past) the QuikFinder with small binos if I want fainter stuff.
  4. I tried using SkEye with my Dob - marginal success; I suspect the phone's magnetometer is just not precise enough (yes, I do know about "figure-8-ing" it )
  5. I don't do it, but I don't think it's overkill at all. If it's what you need to enjoy your binoculars, then do it. Seems to me to be a waste of money to buy decent optical kit and then not mount it in a way that is ideal for you. No, unless you dismantle it, storing a P-mount can be a pain. Mind you, mine has the UA "deluxe" head, which adds another level of storage - and transport - hell because of the system for attaining front-back balance (but I think it's worth it for the sheer joy of using it).
  6. Mine is a Miyauchi BJ100 - no longer made, but I have compared it to others that are available. Quality-wise I prefer it to the Helios offerings, but a friend had the APM ED version, which was noticeably better. He mated it with some TV eyepiece pairs and it was, frankly, stunning. I was tempted to consider selling the Miya and getting one. One caveat about eyepiece pairs: make sure you get them from the same batch. A bloke in our club has the 125mm Vixen and bought two used eyepieces separately; although nominally the same, they were slightly different.
  7. Parallelogram; I've a UA T-mount for my big binos (6kg-ish), for more than 15 years, and I can't imagine going back to anything else, not least because I can always have the eyepiece at a comfortable height, and I can see nearly a quarter of the sky without needing to move (handy if seated).
  8. I love my 100 mm binocular (probably my most-used bit of astro kit) but, looking at your kit list, I wonder if a bog standard 25x100 is what you need. Your TV 102 + 41mm Panoptic will give you far better wide-field views. Something like the Helios LQ-HR might suit you (my review is here ), but the cheaper ones tend not to have anywhere near as sharp a field. The common 100mm binocular lenses tend to be around f/4, so aberrations tend to be quite pronounced. In view of the duplication in aperture with your TV, have you considered something bigger? APM and Vixen both do bigger binos - but they are pricey, mind! But, to directly answer your question, in my opinion it is worth lugging around the bigger bino (+ sturdy parallelogram and tripod), but I wouldn't do it if they didn't have angled eyepieces. I've just noticed @Tomatobro's post - mine has x20 and x37 eyepieces; I've not used the x20 for more than a decade - the wonderful variety of human experience...
  9. Field of view is fairly "flexible" with Galilean optics - it depends how close you get your eye to the exit pupil - which, just to complicate matters, is virtual and between the objective and eyepiece.
  10. it's almost certainly because the right eyepiece dioptre has been mis-set. I don't know how applicable this will be to your binocular (there have been several incarnations of Opticron 20x80s), but if it is one of the more recent ones, this might help: Resetting the Right Eyepiece Dioptre
  11. No - I was referring to this sort of optomechanical dross. The Opticrons can definitely be user-adjusted; I'm not sure about the Helios.
  12. Oops; for some reason this got posted in the wrong thread...
  13. No, most binoculars can be recollimated. The exceptions are mostlycheap tat. Easy. Don't trust daylight tests on terrestrial objects - your eyes & brain try, and often manage, to compensate; this can lead to headaches and/or nausea for prolonged use. Use a bright star. Defocus the right hand side of the binocular (eyepiece dioptre adjustment). Your brain will superimpose the images from either side; If they are collimated, the focused star will appear in the middle of the defocused blob.
  14. AFAIK it's only the Apollos that have filter threads. The downside is that usable eye relief for spectacle wearers in, at best, minimal. I no longer have the Apollos; I replaced them with Lunt Magnesium. I sometimes use a UHC by "pinching" the rubber eyecup to keep it in place.
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