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BinocularSky

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BinocularSky last won the day on March 1 2013

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About BinocularSky

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    White Dwarf

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    http://http:/binocularsky.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Visual astronomy (obviously), Kites, AmDram.
  • Location
    Between the New Forest and Cranborne Chase

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  1. At this time of year? Pleiades, Collinder 70, Beehive, Kemble's Cascade, Eddie's Coaster., M31 - then just browse theMilky Way and see what you can discover.
  2. The main issues are a territorial dispute among the five legs involved and difficulty of observing anything above about 45 degrees.
  3. You'd be better off asking about binoculars in the binocular forums . Of what's currently available and actually worth spending money on, the Olympus DPS 1 10x50 (Amazon, Argos) is about as low as it's sensible to go unless you want stuff with "issues". For a little more, you can get Opticron Adventurer T WP 10x50 (FLO), which is really good value.
  4. Yes. It's called a SpotSlicker Bandit (or sometiems just a Spot Bandit) - intended for spotting scopes.
  5. The March edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: The "extra" star in Cygnus Goodbye Uranus Vesta at opposition Grazing occultation of 52 Geminorum A look at mass segregation in open clusters I hope this helps you to enjoy these spring nights with your binoculars or small telescopes. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it
  6. I have them on all my regularly used binoculars, including daytime ones. I really, really like what they do!
  7. Could be; I have astigmatism; different axis in each eye, and it takes my eyes a few minutes to re-merge images when I remove my glasses. Irritatingly, it gives me "step" (vertical displacement) which is the worst kind of misalignment.
  8. The February edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: The "extra star" in Cygnus is on the way back Vesta approaches naked-eye brightness - and it's nicely placed! Some online dark skies festivals (UK) I hope this helps you to use your binoculars or small telescopes to ease the impact of Covid lockdown restrictions. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it
  9. If you're talking about the Action EX, somewhere between "lots" and "big lots".
  10. They can be specified with or without filter threads; worth asking before you buy. I think some of the Delta Optical (similar, but ED glass) may have filter threads.
  11. You'd have though so, wouldn't you? But they often aren't. The most common 15x70s - UP BA1s (branded as Celstron Skymaster, Revelation, etc) have an effective aperture of 62mm - there is a fixed iris at the entrance to the prism housing that cuts it down, so as to reduce aberrations and sharpen the image, at the cost of image brightness. The binocular noise reduction (aka "physiological summation") is analogous to "stacking" in astro imaging. A combination of physiological and statistical summation gives you a factor of about 1.4x; this is borne out in practice It's very difficult to s
  12. Opticron are always very helpful, and their sales manager, Pete Gamby, sometimes posts on these forums. The other thing you can do is remove the video pin from the QR plate. It serves no purpose for binoculars and can get in the way.
  13. The advice that comes with these trigger grips is usually conspicuous by its absence. So I wrote some: https://binocularsky.com/manuals/TG-manual.pdf
  14. Indeed he does! (Or, rather, "did" before SARS-CoV-2 scuppered my "in person" outreach activities.) But, but... A binocular is "just" two telescopes mounted side by side. Seriously, though, it depends on the task. For some tasks (observing large asterisms, large open clusters, starfields, scanning the Milky Way) binoculars are better. For some tasks (planetary observing, splitting close double stars, resolving small DSOs) telescopes are better. And binoculars are arguably easier for young children to use independently. (IMNSVHO, of course)
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