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BinocularSky

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BinocularSky last won the day on March 1 2013

BinocularSky had the most liked content!

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About BinocularSky

  • Rank
    White Dwarf

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  • Website URL
    http://http:/binocularsky.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Visual astronomy (obviously), Kites, AmDram.
  • Location
    Between the New Forest and Cranborne Chase
  1. The Nikon Action-EX is a lovely binocular. I did a mini comparison review of them here. Similar Quality (OK,a bit better ) to your Strath: Opticron 10x50 T WP. Review here.
  2. Similar experience here. Got both in 16x70 just before the Sun set, but couldn't see Mercury in 6.5x32 then, 20 mins later, both in same field in the little ones.
  3. Excellent! They tend to get slagged off a bit by "internexperts" who read the specification but have never actually handled the binocular itself, but I think you'll find that they serve you for a long time. There is no such thing as a decent zoom binocular. The end.
  4. Probably Swarovski EL, Zeiss Victory SF, and Leica Noctivid, unless you want image-stabilised ones. Very nice. It's the Kunming United Optics MS range, which is slightly better, and lighter, than the BA8 range (eg Helios Apollo/Orion Resolux). The MS range is variously branded as Omegon Argus/Helios Lightquest/Lunt Magnesium - all pretty similar; some cosmetic differences and they changed the AR coatings at some stage. I have the Lunt Magnesium-branded version of the 10x50, which I use a lot, and I have reviewed the LightQuest one here. There is no such thing as a decent zoom binocular. The end.
  5. Late to the party as usual... @miguel87 @John88Where the Olys are concerned, don't be put off by lack of "BAK4" and "FMC", etc. - it's mostly advertising hype. I drone on in far more detail than you probably wanted to know about why here. (Also note: the best binoviewers on the planet use BK7, not BAK4 - or even BaK-4... less chromatic dispersion.) Both The Oly and the T WP are good value and, unless you get a lemon (one way the price is kept down is minimal QC in the factory), you'd likely be happy with either. Reasons I prefer the Opticron include: * It's waterproof (that's the WP in the designation). That means dew will not enter it and help to corrode, encourage fungi, etc. * Bigger "sweet spot" * More eye relief (essential if anyone who will use it needs to wear glasses; the Oly's 12mm eye relief will be inadequate for many, if not most, spectacle-wearers) * Better IPD range; the Oly's minimum of 60mm is too wide for some people with small faces or close-set eyes. * Lighter I've recommended it to tens of people; every one of them (so far) who has given feedback thinks it's a good recommendation. I last had my paws on the Oly before I started doing reviews, but my review of the Opticron is here. (FWIW, the "ordinary" , ie. not "T WP" Adventurer is also reviewed there; I rate that as about equivalent to the Oly, so if you are deciding on a cheaper binocular, it's worth considering). HTH
  6. The May edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: A "surprise" comet η Aquarids A planetary nebula challenge I hope this helps you to enjoy a hobby we can still do under lockdown. To pick up your free copy, just head over to http://binocularsky.com and click on the Newsletter tab, where you can subscribe (also free, of course) to have it emailed each month, and get archived copies.
  7. BinocularSky

    Hello

    Excellent - I'll have the May issue out in the next couple of days. When this lockdown is over, please feel free to come and join us at Fordingbridge Astronomers when we resume observing sessions in the Forest. And if I can give any advice on observing with binoculars, just ask (it's what I do ).
  8. Late to the party, I'm afraid... Indeed I do - lovely combination of stability, light-gathering and power. They get a lot of use. I know cost isn't the whole story, but I can see more with this setup than I can with any IS binocular that costs up to an equivalent amount. Best image quality I've seen in an IS is the Canon 10x42L IS WP. Someone in our club has one and it's a real beauty! I've reviewed the 12x36 and 14x32 and they were both very impressive, especially the IS on the 32, but the 10x42 is just that much better for astro, IMHO (and, of course, being WP, it's dew-resistant).
  9. It's a lovely binocular. I also have a dozen of the 8x42 version for doing outreach with youngsters; perfect for the job. I replaced the eyepiece caps with tethered double rainguards.
  10. Seriously, it's not that difficult. Probably the most difficult part is getting the glue out of the screw holes without doing unto the screw-heads what COVID-19 is doing unto the global economy! It's put there as an anti-tamper measure, which is silly, given that so many of the models with that prism housing eventually need tweaking.
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