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BinocularSky

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BinocularSky last won the day on March 1 2013

BinocularSky had the most liked content!

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About BinocularSky

  • Rank
    White Dwarf

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  • Website URL
    http://http:/binocularsky.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Visual astronomy (obviously), Kites, AmDram.
  • Location
    Between the New Forest and Cranborne Chase
  1. BinocularSky

    20x80 binocular balancing

    The night sky, as you have discovered, is a far stiffer test of binoculars than is any daytime scene. If the binocular is still under warranty, return it. I have an objective tube from one of these binoculars (intending to make an 80mm finder). I've just dismantled it and cannot see how adjusting either of the rings in the diagram would make a blind bit of difference to the lens (if someone can, please tell me!). However, if you pull back the rubber on a prism housing where I've indicated, you should see a tiny screw hole (may need glue-removal). Use a small flat screwdriver and it will move the image in the direction you are screwing it. Use Polaris. If you defocus one image, so it is a blob, this will stop your eyes trying to merge them. Tweak the screws until the focused star ends up in the middle of the blob. It'll probably only be correct for your IPD. HTH, but feel free to ask more if you need to.
  2. BinocularSky

    Milky Way binoculars,

    My (mini-)review of the SG 2.1x42 is in the BinoSky NL Dec 2015 (available from http://binocularsky.com/newsletter_archive.php ). You should also check out @DirkSteele's superb review.
  3. BinocularSky

    Milky Way binoculars,

    I really like my Vixen SG 6.5x32 WP ED (9* FoV) for that sort of thing. Beautifully sharp across the FoV. Review here.
  4. BinocularSky

    Venus in the daytime

    No reason why not; it has about the same albedo as off-white paint (0.77), which is easily visible against a daylight sky. (cf the Moon, which has about the same albedo as tarmac (0.1), but is still easily visible against a daylit sky)
  5. BinocularSky

    RDF fitment to my new bino's

    I use a Rigel Quikfinder. The base is stuck to the LH tube (I am right-eye dominant, so the LH tube location reduces the likelihood that I'll breathe on the eyepieces) with the double-sided adhesive mounting tape that comes with the QF (still firmly adhered after 15 years). This enables me to continue using the handle, which I find invaluable when putting the binocular onto (and off) the mounting bar on the T-mount that I usually put it on. Although it's not as much of a dew-magnet as a Telrad, the QF does benefit from a dew shield (which also helps to get your eye into the correct position - my design for one is here. It's an added bonus that the QF outer circle is as near as dammit the same as he FoV of my favourite eyepieces. If you don't fancy the expense of the QF, you could stick a standard finder shoe wherever you want on the binocular with decent mounting tape (I have found the 3M stuff to be extremely good), and use a "normal" RDF. HTH
  6. BinocularSky

    Lunt 8x32 Solar Bins.

    I would certainly hope so, given the price differential! Just got them for very quick "preliminary" views (which, apart from eclipses, are all binos are good for on the Sun, I think). For "proper" obs, I would use one of my other options (Baader-filtered "ordinary" scope, Coronado PST, Solarscope).
  7. The June edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready for download. Despite the very short nights, as well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: * Uranus and Neptune are back (just!) * Vesta is well-placed and brightening slightly * A bright Mira variable is near maximum When you next get a clear night sky, grab your binocs (or small telescope) and use this guide to enjoy, and share with others, what the night sky freely offers us this month. To get your (free!) copy, or to subscribe (also free) and receive it monthly, please go to http://binocularsky.com and click on the 'Newsletter' tab.
  8. BinocularSky

    Lunt 8x32 Solar Bins.

    Given the comments on Amazon (US) about solar binoculars not showing anything at all, you are clearly not alone. My technique (if you can dignify it with that name), is to hold the binoc slightly away from my eyes, line the hinge up with a point vertically below the Sun, raise the binoc to my eyes without moving my head, then slowly pan upwards. I haven't rigorously quantified it, but I reckon that this gives me a success rate in excess of 80% (at least high enough that I feel no need to seek other solutions). For mounted solar-filtered binocs, I look at the shadow they cast.
  9. BinocularSky

    Lunt 8x32 Solar Bins.

    This arrived yesterday arvo: Managed a glimpse of the Sun through thin cloud this morning; seem OK. Chose the 10x25 because: * Light gathering of 25mm is not going to be an issue with the Sun. * Dawes limit of 25mm is not going to be an issue at 10x. * 10x will almost certainly show me more detail than the 6x or 8x of other offerings. * I'm a cheapskate, and these are now heavily discounted in the US (eclipse has passed) - only $40 including shipping and import tax. The filters (actually 2 in each side) unscrew, leaving a bare tube end, but enables you to check collimation & set the right eyepiece dioptre during daylight. Careful: it would be very easy to cross-thread these! They snap to focus quite nicely, but only the central quarter of the FoV is properly sharp (but FoV is 5.7*, and the Sun is only 0.5*, so that needn't be an issue) - mixture of field curvature, astigmatism and coma; I expect stars would look like small fuzzy seagulls near the edge . Severe negative (pincushion) distortion near the periphery, but the image is so blurred there that it's not usable anyway. Claim to be multi-coated. One of the hinges is much looser than the other. It's going to annoy me, so I need to learn how to dismantle and tweak compacts. The included instruction manual only covers the 10x42, not the 10x25 (same for electronic version on Celestron's website).
  10. BinocularSky

    Second hand pitfalls

    Nah, window cleaner with a cranked head (+ a bungee to secure the binocs): height adjustable, and the cranked head allows clearance for astronomer's belly. ... but, if you are using a broom (or a rake), do cover the business end with a clean cloth: Edit: PS, just scanned your QR code. Clever (but slightly disappointing )
  11. BinocularSky

    Second hand pitfalls

    Just to add, always use a bright light for this, at least until you know exactly what you are looking for. The bloke who sold this to me said they were fungus-free; when I showed him the image, he was mortified. Turns out he didn't use a light and was relying on ambient indoor light (under which they appear as almost imperceptible spots).
  12. BinocularSky

    Filters for Binoculars

    I do the same. You can either "blink" (useful for detecting e.g. planetaries), or use both eyes and have the one view superimposed on the other for the "sheer enjoyment" effect.
  13. The May edition of the Binocular Sky Newsletter is ready for download. As well as the usual overview of DSOs, variable and double stars, this month we have: * Bright nova in Perseus * Vesta brightening * A couple of Mira variables near maximum When you next get a clear night sky, grab your binocs (or small telescope) and use this guide to enjoy, and share with others, what the night sky freely offers us this month. To get your (free!) copy, or to subscribe (also free) and receive it monthly, please go to http://binocularsky.com and click on the 'Newsletter' tab.
  14. Coronado PST 40 (and probably many others)
  15. BinocularSky

    Bushnell 10x50 Permafocus Binocular

    Focus-free binoculars are no good for astronomy. They are (nominally) set at what is called the "hyperfocal distance" (about 70% of the way to infinity focus) and your eye has to do the rest. I have some info on choosing binoculars for astronomy, plus some "best buys" at http://binocularsky.com/binoc_choosing.php Opticron Adventurer (as mentioned by @Stormbringer above. There's a review on the website I linked to above. HTH
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