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Owmuchonomy

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About Owmuchonomy

  • Rank
    R Class
  • Birthday 02/09/59

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Rejuvenated childhood interest in Astronomy. Photography, cycling, classic rock.
  • Location
    Harrogate N. Yorks
  1. App recommendations?

    Make sure you can run it forward a few years as the juicy planetary targets aren't visible until then. I use Sky Safari on all my iOS and Mac devices. It is an excellent app.
  2. My practical experience of this is that for an Alt-Az set up if I take the trouble to level then the 2 star align works first time. If I don't bother to level it can take a few iterations. I am talking about Synscan by the way and like Olly says I often feel the software just likes to wind me up sometimes and not others.
  3. Sun-17-11-17

    Got any figs? Yes, some dedication.
  4. Beginner astrophotography

    If you fully intend getting a DSLR rather than a dedicated astro camera then there are some things to consider and I list a few here. I wouldn't 'forget' a DSLR for solar system imaging as mentioned above. Given the right camera it is perfectly possible to get great shots of the Moon, Sun (with correct protection) and planets (when they are in our sky). 1) Buy a DSLR with a flip out screen. Makes it so much easier to focus! 2) Consider an astro modded DSLR to allow greater sensitivity in the H-alpha region of the spectrum. 3) Choose a DSLR with the best choice of video modes. For example my Canon 60D (no longer available new) had true movie crop mode at 640 x 480 and 60 fps capability. This is more than good enough as an entry for solar system imaging without going to a specific planetary camera. I am not familiar with new models that can match this specification but someone may come along with that advice. There are some good choices second hand though. The 550D is another with the most suitable video mode. Whilst you can achieve results with an Alt/Az mount by far the most important bit of kit for longer exposure work is the mount. You really need a good quality equatorial platform for imaging DSOs.
  5. Hello

    Hi Nojus looks like you have a good start to the hobby.
  6. Welcome to the spectroscopy board

    + 1 for Ken's book.
  7. shed size 6x6 or 7x5

    Doh!
  8. Danger - I tried goto and I liked it!

    Life's too short. Under my skies in this country it's a no-brainer.
  9. time lapse with SW star adventurer catch 22

    My feeling is that the answer to this is more about processing skills than mount operation/exposure. Combing separate foreground and background images maybe?
  10. shed size 6x6 or 7x5

    Yes, as Steve says. I did a lot of calculations for mine and ended up with nothing less than 8' x 6', each time I looked at the project. I actually went 8" x 8" and I'm so glad I did. I can just fit 4 of us in there with my stuff.
  11. Binocular session in Swaledale

    I finally made it up there last night. Ripon - Masham - Leyburn - Hawes. Stopped for a cuppa and checked out the sky. A bit darker than my garden to the West and North, but the South was poor. Lot of overspill light there. Naked eye Andromeda was a larger object than at home. Then a HUGE fireball from Perseus to UM. Wow that was lucky. I purposely did not bring any gear other than my eyes and pocket bins. Set off up Buttertubs to Keld and then to Stonesdale Moor. As you say plenty of good pull off spots. Spent some time gaining night vision and then stepped out into the FREEZING wind. M13 naked eye, Uranus naked eye so Mag 5.7 skies. Best Cygnus rift I have ever seen I think but the South below Pisces was still quite bright. Orion rising was clear. I may have snagged the California with the bins but not sure I could define it properly. It was too cold in the strong N wind. I will come back with more kit next time. I headed over Tan Hill and of course as soon as you do that the sky is orange with Teeside. Thanks for the tip off, I'll be back. Have you observed in Arkengarthdale?
  12. Skywatcher Synscan GOTO Question

    The alignment Merlin66 describes is your mount's polar alignment which as he points out shouldn't change as long as you don't nudge the mount. However, your GoTo alignment may do so as I have explained. They are separate procedures.
  13. Skywatcher Synscan GOTO Question

    Hi Morgy. There is some chance the alignment will not carry over from one scope to the other or you could be lucky and its fine. It is probable, as I know from experience, that the alignment of the OTA with its dovetail bar will differ between your scopes. However, the difference should be minimal. There are at least 2 ways to deal with it. Firstly you can adjust your GoTo alignment slightly by carrying out a new 3 star alignment when you switch scopes or secondly and the more permanent option is to set up alignment with one scope (I would use the MAK) and then mount your Newt and adjust the cone error adjusters on the dovetail to bring it into alignment. The latter method should help out and you should only need to do it once.
  14. A Birthday Saturn!

    Super result Avani. Is that the the colour 290 or the mono?
  15. Which Telescope?

    Hi Bob. You are right to observe that not one 'scope fits all. Bear in mind that the juicy planets are poorly placed for some years to come I'm afraid. The mount you describe is indeed a benchmark for imaging (and observing) although if you predominantly are observing then you shouldn't dismiss an Alt Azimuth mount. Neither should you dismiss the Dobsonian option. I think I would ask you about other issues that your students may face such as: 1) How good are your skies? 2) How portable (or not) does your set up need to be? 3) Will you want more than one student to use equipment at the same time? Where in the country are you? I ask this because I have offered my obsy set up to the local school for GCSE astronomy. It may be that you could try a local club first to get a feel for the scopes on offer.
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