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Obsession 25" dobsonian


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My word thats just crazy!!:) but i think its a bargin if you have the money and somewhere too put it, could get a lifetimes exploration out of that thing and at the price of a modest supercar its a bargin:D

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Lol love this disclaimer at the bottom.

Warning Please note this product was not designed or intended by the manufacturer for use by a child 12 years of age or younger.

Last thing you need is someone with chocolate fingers.

sent from my android using Tapatalk

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I had a look through one once. To summarise: you're up a ladder - in the dark - there's nothing to hold on to (as the bearings were so smooth). I was too distracted by the possibility of falling off (or in :)) to enjoy the experience much.

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I had a look through one once. To summarise: you're up a ladder - in the dark - there's nothing to hold on to (as the bearings were so smooth). I was too distracted by the possibility of falling off (or in :)) to enjoy the experience much.

Ah yes. I guess this is a common problem with scopes this size - to have the primary damaged by falling observers.

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If you can afford the price of that 50 inch then an observatory that keeps you at eyepiece height where ever the scope is pointed wouldn't be beyond your wallet, either that or stick a camera on the eyepiece and view on a 50 inch plasma tv in the warm, fully auto goto from a laptop? Little robot arm to change eyepieces?

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MY advice is not too look through a really big scope. I had a look through a great David Lukehurst 20" dobsonian at last years SGL star party. I viewed M51 then M13. The views were totally stunning but made me feel rather inadequate about my 10" newtonian for a number of weeks afterwards ...... :p

Mind you at this years star party I stuck to 6" scopes and we had a great time under the dark skies ........ so size is not everything :)

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I had a chance to help repair (and then test!!) a 24" obsession dob. This fellow had a special truck, with a special trailer (custom made), and a special fiberglass ladder to stand on while you observed. I guess that qualifies as "having more $ in accessories than in the scope" :)

I must say the views were just stunning, even color in some brighter nebulae like Orion, but the whole ladder thing was a deal-breaker for me. If I had something like that, I'd have to have a permanent place for it - like a 6-foot deep hole in the ground! :) Then I'd just walk around the edge of the hole and look through the eyepiece without fear of falling off and hurting myself. :p

Either that, or I'd go for a pair of JMI's 16" binoculars. I have a 10" pair, they are fantastic! (and a lot easier to use than a giant dob!) Jim will make binos as big as 22" for a special order if the 16's aren't big enough. :p

Dan

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I agree Dan, I am much happier on terra firma and would always want to observe on my feet. the views though I bet are something else.

My own wish if I ever get a large scope (max 18-20") would be to keep the focal length under 2m that way I have a chance of just maybe standing on a small box at the zenith.

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Ladders....falling off.....bunch of wimps :p

With a big dob you will always be surrounded by a crowd who want a look and who will break your fall :):D:D.

The trick is a ladder like fruit pickers use, where the base is very wide, and so very stable.

I know that Olly has built his own steps with handrails etc for his 20 inch.

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All on hold at the moment John....we may be moving, we may not.

Either way it will be a while before I'm ready to start building the beast.

I have sourced all of the bits that I don't want to build though, and have pored over the Kriege and Berry book for many an hour.

The optics are safely packed and just waiting for the right time.....there was a 22 inch Dob called 'Big Blue'......this one will be called 'Deep Purple' :)

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Ladders....falling off.....bunch of wimps :p

With a big dob you will always be surrounded by a crowd who want a look and who will break your fall :p:D:D.

Excellent! I almost always have a flock of students about when I'm observing, and many of them are rather plush looking and seem well fed. I'll just have a few of them lie about underneath me as I observe in a huge telescope from on top of a giant ladder! (I knew teens were good for something!)

You know, they say you can not be a successful grant writer if you don't think BIG. This way, I'll not only have a cool new telescope, but I'll provide jobs (student "landing pad assistant", I should think!). Heck, I'll be a local hero and folk legend before you know it! :)

If I win the grant - I'll name my giant telescope after you! Of course, all the students will want to know why we call the 50" dob "Big Rob", but I'll regale them with the story as they lie about waiting for me to fall off the ladder! :)

Cheers!

Dan

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