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Ant

SKywatcher LPR Filter Vs Baader Neodymium Filter

15 posts in this topic

Steve from First Light Optics kindly lent me a New 2" Skywatcher Light Pollution Filter.

Last night at the end of my imaging run I changed filter so that I could do a side by side - same conditions, temperature, orientation, object, scope - I took great care to ensure that within reason everything was the same.

So the target is M81 and M82. The camera was a 300D at prime focus of the Revalation ED80.

The ISO was 1600, taken in RAW mode. All images were stored on the CF Card.

The whole imaging run last night was with the Skywatcher filter (so I'm looking forward to processing the Subs). The cooling time between subs was 30 seconds. The time between last sub (with Skywatcher filter) and image with Baadar Neodymium filter was around a minute - the time it took to change the filter.

So if anything the Baadar filter had the benefit of a longer cool down time - but I doubt that had much of a bearing.

Below are the three images, the first is the image with NO FILTER at all. Then the Baader Neodymium Filter and then lastly the Skywatcher filter.

Images imported to PS CS2, re-sized and saved as Jpg's (quality 12).

NO FILTER

10541_normal.jpeg

(click to enlarge)

Neodymium Filter

10542_normal.jpeg

(click to enlarge)

Skywatcher Filter

10544_normal.jpeg

(click to enlarge)

The difference in price means that IMO the Skywatcher Filter is a much better buy. I will try the filters again at longer exposures and see what's happens.

Oh and the filter case that it comes in looks sweet!

I have uploaded a RAR file to UKastronomers, should anyone want to look / play with the RAW files. The histogram's do look different - download the RAW's and have a look. http://ukastronomers.com/ant/action/download_files/fileid/80 .

Here is the final image of the session last night, 60 x 2 minute subs. Skywatcher LPR filter. ISO 1600. ED80 plus 300D.

Need help with the processing though. NEED DARK FRAMES!

10550_normal.jpeg

(click to enlarge)

Ant

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I am pretty sure the Skywatcher one is very nearly the same as the Neodymium one. I have one of the Neo filters and found it useless for light pollution, we must have diffrent bulbs in our streetlights in Edinburgh as your images show a good reduction in pollution.

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I agree with Craig, pretty sure the Skywatcher is a Neodymium or very close to it. I have the Neodymium and Rob has the Skywatcher, we were amazed the views were near identical.

For my location the Neodymium works like a charm. Has to be the street lamp type.

Russ

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Look to be very good VFM provided you have the right type of light pollution (not that you can have the right type of ligh pollution) might add one to the box to improve contrats on the guidecam maybe...

Billy...

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When buying a LPR, check it promptly so that it can be returned if found unsuitable. When an LPR works (when it matches you particular type of light pollution) the results can be magical.

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Nice review Ant. You can't beat photographic comparisons when it comes to this sort of thing.

I recently acquired a Baader Neodymium filter and have used it in my 80mm scope. From my initial experimentation, there's almost no difference when using it in for purely optical observation. I did notice very slight differences when viewing the Orion Nebula, but not enough to recommend a brand new purchase of the filter (luckily mine was second hand).

However, I get the impression that my scope doesn't really have the oomph to give the filter a run for its money. It does improve contrast, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you can see more with my little 80mm lens. But my next scope (whatever that'll be) will be bigger and I'm guessing that on something 100mm plus, or for long expose photography is when the filter will begin to earn its money.

Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong though.

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When buying a LPR, check it promptly so that it can be returned if found unsuitable. When an LPR works (when it matches you particular type of light pollution) the results can be magical.

If i bought one of you would you accept it back?

1 person likes this

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Lol, I put up a link as George just wanted one for a 1.25" this then turns into which filter is best again. George buy both and try both and send one back, I am sure FLO will accept that?

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with out the neo filter i never could see m110 ever it popped out ,the sw lpf is great i have the 2 " one both good but if i had a choice would be the neo , i never saw the redspot till i got the neo filter

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This is an interesting test. Thanks for taking the time to do it. The SW LPR filters are excellent value, I have the 1.25" and the 2". All the best. Ed

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with out the neo filter i never could see m110 ever it popped out ,the sw lpf is great i have the 2 " one both good but if i had a choice would be the neo , i never saw the redspot till i got the neo filter

Interesting! I found my SW LP to be useless but I'm willing to see if it makes any improvement on M110. I can with averted vision make it out but it's in now way obvious so any improvement would be welcomed. Thanks for the heads up Todd.

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The Baader Neodymium Filter now has "Phantom coatings with UV/IR cut" meaning it can be used with a webcam or other camera to get better images from the planets. If it works, then for a price of one filter we get two.

Did the one used in this test has this?

The Skywatcher one doesn't seem to have it.

Ricardo

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Hello will the Skywatcher one help bring out the red spot on Jupiter? i have a 200p skyview dob

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Nicely done. Thanks for the review

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