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C11 with focal reducer (1760mm), ASI183mm Pro. Astrodon filters. Mesu 200. Pixinsight.

80 x 60s L

30 x 60s RGB

2.8 Hours data.

Thanks for looking.

Dave.

 

NGC 6946.jpg

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14 minutes ago, Star101 said:

C11 with focal reducer (1760mm), ASI183mm Pro. Astrodon filters. Mesu 200. Pixinsight.

80 x 60s L

30 x 60s RGB

2.8 Hours data.

Thanks for looking.

Dave.

 

NGC 6946.jpg

Splendid image!

Klitwo

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13 hours ago, Cyclops said:

Very nice image

Thank you Cyclops.

 

13 hours ago, Klitwo said:

Splendid image!

Klitwo

Thank you Klitwo

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