Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_planets.thumb.jpg.e76f0a73fd950ae15415beb032373794.jpg

Recommended Posts

A recently published NB image in two flavours from Nicholas Outters (of Squid Nebula fame) and friends. They appeared on the French forum and I thought them outstanding. The colour is incredibly intense but it is supported by the data and free of colour noise. And it's seriously deep.

http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo82.htm

Olly

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

A recently published NB image in two flavours from Nicholas Outters (of Squid Nebula fame) and friends. They appeared on the French forum and I thought them outstanding. The colour is incredibly intense but it is supported by the data and free of colour noise. And it's seriously deep.

http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo82.htm

Olly

With a TEC160FL - a reasonably decent scope Olly 😉

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, ollypenrice said:

free of colour noise. And it's seriously deep.

Looks amazing does that say 109 hours of data? I don't speak French. I was watching a very interesting video by Ken Crawford last night. He has some great shots too.

Gerry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Gerry Casa Christiana said:

Looks amazing does that say 109 hours of data? I don't speak French. I was watching a very interesting video by Ken Crawford last night. He has some great shots too.

Gerry

Yes, 109 hours. That's one of the reasons it's so good, of course.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a real stunner - I must look at the FOV I have and see if I can get something half decent with the dual rigs :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stunning! Unfortunately it is too low on the horizon here for even a half decent imaging attempt. If I get it right it was aquired from a remote obsy high up in the mountains in Chile, which may have helped a bit. Is it a mosaic? Otherwise 109 hours must be close to a record.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ollypenrice said:

Yes, 109 hours.

...so a lifetime’s work for any mortal in the UK (even if it was high enough.) 😕

Oh well, glad someone’s able to do it.

Edited by AKB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, AKB said:

...so a lifetime’s work for any mortal in the UK (even if it was high enough.) 😕

Oh well, glad someone’s able to do it.

They have a setup in Chile which explains a lot!

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, gorann said:

Stunning! Unfortunately it is too low on the horizon here for even a half decent imaging attempt. If I get it right it was aquired from a remote obsy high up in the mountains in Chile, which may have helped a bit. Is it a mosaic? Otherwise 109 hours must be close to a record.

Should be a single frame, I think. It's an easy fit for me with the TEC140.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ollypenrice said:

They have a setup in Chile which explains a lot!

Do I detect a hint of envy from even you?!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, AKB said:

Do I detect a hint of envy from even you?!

More than a hint! The guys who bought our 20 inch Dob are setting up a big hosting operation in Chile and one is taking his family out to live there. Quite an adventure. And Karel Teuwen, who used to have a robotic setup about 20 miles from me, has now set up in Chile as well. There are at least two French providers there already. Flavour of the month!

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing image. Looks like Chile is the place to be 😜

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

It's a stunning image, and hats off for the effort and craftsmanship that went into it.

The top, false-colour image is borderline "PixInsighted", in my opinion. It reminds me of those HDR processed early images from PixInsight. I like the bottom version better. The colour palette quiets it down a little as well.

On 09/06/2018 at 12:12, Mr Spock said:

Amazing image. Looks like Chile is the place to be 😜

I guess that's why ESA and a bunch of universities have their gear set up there. 😀 But at their sites, altitude sickness can spoil the stargazing fun.

On 09/06/2018 at 12:15, gorann said:

Btw, those are actually two independent sites, afaIk. The domes are from Chilescope:

http://www.chilescope.com/image-gallery/29/

http://www.chilescope.com/

Edited by wimvb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unbelievably detailed! Wish I could be able to capture like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

There is even a youtube video about the place, which seems to be a site specializing in hosting remote obsies (see http://obstech.cl/)

 

 

Edited by gorann

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, wimvb said:

 

The top, false-colour image is borderline "PixInsighted", in my opinion. It reminds me of those HDR processed early images from PixInsight. 

 

When I first opened the image on the French forum I thought that this is what I was going to feel as well. However, as I looked carefully at it that impression changed. The HDR wavelet mania produces images which look like a human brain, in the words of the much-missed Roundycat on here. They stamp a kind of uniform squiggleyness  on an image. But here the intense small scale contrasts seem to arise from the data, varying with it across the frame. For me this remains, for all its intensity, 'within the data.'

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wim @wimvb& Olly @ollypenrice

Since I am primarily a PS person that has never used HDRW in PI so far, could you show me (e.g. by a link to an image) what this HDR mania looks like, so I know what to avoid if I try HDRW.

By the way, can HDRW be used on images that have been non-linearly stretched (i.e. can I try it on some of my finished PS images)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, gorann said:

Wim @wimvb& Olly @ollypenrice

Since I am primarily a PS person that has never used HDRW in PI so far, could you show me (e.g. by a link to an image) what this HDR mania looks like, so I know what to avoid if I try HDRW.

By the way, can HDRW be used on images that have been non-linearly stretched (i.e. can I try it on some of my finished PS images)?

This example is pushed further than I would go:

http://pixinsight.com/tutorials/NGC7023-HDR/index.html

Even if the squiggleyness is supported by the data, in my personal opinion it is pushed too far.

This is actually very easy to accomplish Göran. Just use HDR multiscale transformation with layers set to 3 - 4 and iterrations 3 or so. You need quality data to pull it off, though.

As I've said before: PixInsight is a power tool. And as with any power tool, you have to use a light touch or it will grind away at your data. The way I would tame the beast is by using a (you guessed it:) mask. A normal lightness copy of the image, with the brightest parts brought back to 50%, will usually do the trick.

In the image from the french AP forum, the effect is much less. And it only shows in the very brightest part of the image. That's why I wrote "borderline". If you put the false colour and rgb versions side by side, it shows that the data is the same but that the structures in the rgb version are more subtle.

In the end it's all about personal taste. Interpreting data and personalising an image is part of the fun in AP. And it's images like these that help me define where I want to go (or not go) in my AP efforts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, wimvb said:

This example is pushed further than I would go:

http://pixinsight.com/tutorials/NGC7023-HDR/index.html

Even if the squiggleyness is supported by the data, in my personal opinion it is pushed too far.

This is actually very easy to accomplish Göran. Just use HDR multiscale transformation with layers set to 3 - 4 and iterrations 3 or so. You need quality data to pull it off, though.

As I've said before: PixInsight is a power tool. And as with any power tool, you have to use a light touch or it will grind away at your data. The way I would tame the beast is by using a (you guessed it:) mask. A normal lightness copy of the image, with the brightest parts brought back to 50%, will usually do the trick.

In the image from the french AP forum, the effect is much less. And it only shows in the very brightest part of the image. That's why I wrote "borderline". If you put the false colour and rgb versions side by side, it shows that the data is the same but that the structures in the rgb version are more subtle.

In the end it's all about personal taste. Interpreting data and personalising an image is part of the fun in AP. And it's images like these that help me define where I want to go (or not go) in my AP efforts.

I can see what you mean Wim in that PI tutorial image - looks quite artificial. I guess I get a better feeling for the effects and limits if (when) I start playing with HDRW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎08‎/‎06‎/‎2018 at 20:17, ollypenrice said:

A recently published NB image in two flavours from Nicholas Outters (of Squid Nebula fame) and friends. They appeared on the French forum and I thought them outstanding. The colour is incredibly intense but it is supported by the data and free of colour noise. And it's seriously deep.

http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo82.htm

Olly

My word, they are phenomenally good images.

That location has got to be the next best thing to earth orbit. If I ever do proper remote imaging, that's where my rig would need to be. Alas, Mrs Tomato is still not convinced that Atacama is the hot retirement location for ex-pat Brits :icon_mrgreen:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, tomato said:

My word, they are phenomenally good images.

That location has got to be the next best thing to earth orbit. If I ever do proper remote imaging, that's where my rig would need to be. Alas, Mrs Tomato is still not convinced that Atacama is the hot retirement location for ex-pat Brits :icon_mrgreen:

Oh it is! Just think of it as an extended south Pacific beach...

Olly

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/06/2018 at 12:38, gorann said:

Wim @wimvb& Olly @ollypenrice

Since I am primarily a PS person that has never used HDRW in PI so far, could you show me (e.g. by a link to an image) what this HDR mania looks like, so I know what to avoid if I try HDRW.

By the way, can HDRW be used on images that have been non-linearly stretched (i.e. can I try it on some of my finished PS images)?

I wouldn't be comfortable in linking to someone else's image as a demo of 'how not to do it' and the PI community have really toned down the over-use of HDR wavelets in the mast few years.

I realize that the wavelets are derived from the data but they used to impose a uniformity which belied this, in my view.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.