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Speed of Light Exceeded? - LHC Announcement


PunkJay

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Whilst I was quite happy to believe in the speed of light and its limitations and rules governing it...was also open to the fact it was based on predictions and understanding of an underdeveloped species on a tiny rock rotating around a fairly insignificant star...in a mundane galaxy in a massive universe.

Possible we know as much as we can - or as I believe don't really know as much about physics as we think we do :glasses2:

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Whilst I was quite happy to believe in the speed of light and its limitations and rules governing it...was also open to the fact it was based on predictions and understanding of an underdeveloped species on a tiny rock rotating around a fairly insignificant star...in a mundane galaxy in a massive universe.

Possible we know as much as we can - or as I believe don't really know as much about physics as we think we do :glasses2:

Well said! We humans need to remember this from time to time

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Thats very interesting - I like the way that are throwing their work open to wider scrutiny before making big claims, despite checking it many times themselves - a true spirit of scientific investigation there :rolleyes:

If these neutrino's have exceeded LS I wonder how many other theories will need to be re-thought :glasses2:

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There was an interesting blog post from Tommasso Dorigo (physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN) which he then removed - and apparently will repost

New Results From Opera Due Tomorrow

My understanding (and memory!) of the removed posting was that the detection timing was very well understood, but maybe the production wasn't and some neutrinos were emitted earlier than thought. So worth watching that for thoughts from an expert - that blog and Résonaances are both excellent sources for current results in particle physics.

Some more in Luboš Motl's blog

http://motls.blogspot.com/2011/09/italian-out-of-tune-superluminal.html

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Whilst I was quite happy to believe in the speed of light and its limitations and rules governing it...was also open to the fact it was based on predictions and understanding of an underdeveloped species on a tiny rock rotating around a fairly insignificant star...in a mundane galaxy in a massive universe.

Possible we know as much as we can - or as I believe don't really know as much about physics as we think we do :rolleyes:

Well said sir. :glasses2:

It is incredibly exciting to have a whole new universe of undiscovered knowledge open up to us.

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There was an interesting blog post from Tommasso Dorigo (physicist working with the CMS experiment at CERN) which he then removed - and apparently will repost

New Results From Opera Due Tomorrow

My understanding (and memory!) of the removed posting was that the detection timing was very well understood, but maybe the production wasn't and some neutrinos were emitted earlier than thought.

It would explain things.

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My other concern here would be the neutrino results from SN1987a; the neutrinos arrived three hours before the light, consistent with emission from a core-collapse supernova where the star is transparent to neutrinos but not to light, which isn't emitted until shock break-out some hours later.

The supernova was at 52kpc, or 1.6x10^18 km, so if you get 60ns over 800km...

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I wonder , is this a space time issue created by the speed of the material in relation to the mass of Earth ie altering the space time it sits in ( time travel forward / loop shortcut in time to destination . The relative speed is still the known constant ,just had slightly less distance to travel than the rest of us to the given point ) or am I totally lost ?

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I've just finished answering an OU assignment question using the universal constant, do you think I should instead answer "your formulas may be incorrect so I can't answer this one" :-)

Very very interesting times ahead if this one is verified.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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The supernova was at 52kpc, or 1.6x10^18 km, so if you get 60ns over 800km...

That comes out at nearly four years. Perhaps they should be looking for any records of a neutrino burst sometime in 1983?

How did they establish synchronisation between the two sites, I wonder?

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Of course it could be retracted and the team are being scrupulously honest and trying to prevent the fatuous press from brewing up a load of nonsense.

On the other hand we do not have a totally convincing theory of time. I'm mildly obsessed by this so rejoice when a ***** in the armour of past-present-future appears. Past-present-future cannot possibly be the whole story of time.

Olly

Edit; that word filter again?? For goodness sake, do Americans have to rule every second of our lives? The word removed is, I suppose, considered racist against chinese people but is in the OED as a blemish in a smooth surface. I'm old enough to be allowed to find this annoying.

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It's not a timezone problem is it? That always confuses me :glasses2:

Comedy genius....or perhaps one group is in daylight saving, the other isn't.

Fascinating stuff though, the scientific method in action, it's great that items like this make the news, even if it means we have to put up with a few sensationalist tabloid headlines

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