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Solar cycle.


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Recently bought a wedge but I started with a film filter 19 years ago. Prefer visual its so enjoyable and dabble with imaging. 

If your browsing the section and dont own a solar filter nows the time to buy one. Our sun is heading towards an active cycle so It will double your opportunities to use you scope amd its the only way to see a star up close. 

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I haven’t been in this hobby for long and I didn’t think I’d be interested in solar. But last year I purchased a white light filter in order to see the partial eclipse. Of course it was cloudy 😕.

However, I was wrong and I find it really enjoyable, so much so that I’m seriously considering investing in some dedicated gear. 

I’ve also noticed that kids often enjoy it too. My daughter does but then she’s interested in all astronomy. As an example - at the end of April my daughter had a friend and over for the day. Apparently she’s not that interested but she was interested when she looked at the sun/sunspots. At that time there was an impressive set of sunspots and it got a “wow” from her. And she spent more the the “quick look and go” that you can get from children.

Probably a number of reasons eg - they like the essential safety briefing; no need to get eyes use to the dark; it’s not freezing cold; because it’s daytime they can easily do other things & dip in and out. 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, PeterStudz said:

I haven’t been in this hobby for long and I didn’t think I’d be interested in solar. But last year I purchased a white light filter in order to see the partial eclipse. Of course it was cloudy 😕.

However, I was wrong and I find it really enjoyable, so much so that I’m seriously considering investing in some dedicated gear. 

I’ve also noticed that kids often enjoy it too. My daughter does but then she’s interested in all astronomy. As an example - at the end of April my daughter had a friend and over for the day. Apparently she’s not that interested but she was interested when she looked at the sun/sunspots. At that time there was an impressive set of sunspots and it got a “wow” from her. And she spent more the the “quick look and go” that you can get from children.

Probably a number of reasons eg - they like the essential safety briefing; no need to get eyes use to the dark; it’s not freezing cold; because it’s daytime they can easily do other things & dip in and out. 

Yep, you'll be hooked but when you are your wallet won't like it, lol. It's worth it though. just todays snippets in Calcium II K proms and HA full disk screenshots.

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Edited by Nigella Bryant
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You need a really great hydrogen alpha filter, ideally double stacked, to achieve high contrast on surface filaments and detail around active regions. But white light always delivers high contrast views, even at powerful magnifications. The seeing today for me in London was incredible - type of steadiness I maybe get once a year - and though I had a great time in Ha, I’m kicking myself I didn’t get the WL wedge out. Could have gone up to 200x today as conditions were so good.

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Loving this thread. I am strictly white light and the opportunity to show my neighbours ranging in age from 16 to 84 the sun spots was very rewarding.

Just like #PeterStudz I had no interest in  Solar. It took me two years to realise I live on a planet next to a star in space that I could simply look at with a sheet of solar film.

All that looking at stars light years away distracted me from the one that keeps us alive right next door.

Marv

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18 minutes ago, Marvin Jenkins said:

It took me two years to realise I live on a planet next to a star in space that I could simply look at with a sheet of solar film.

All that looking at stars light years away distracted me from the one that keeps us alive right next door.

Marv

That's what I tell people, we have a star on our doorstep that we can observe in wonderful detail. 

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1 hour ago, Marvin Jenkins said:

Loving this thread. I am strictly white light and the opportunity to show my neighbours ranging in age from 16 to 84 the sun spots was very rewarding.

Just like #PeterStudz I had no interest in  Solar. It took me two years to realise I live on a planet next to a star in space that I could simply look at with a sheet of solar film.

All that looking at stars light years away distracted me from the one that keeps us alive right next door.

Marv

Well said :thumbsup:

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