Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_dslr_mirrorlesss_winners.thumb.jpg.9deb4a8db27e7485a7bb99d98667c94e.jpg

Adaaam75

Just a Quickie!!!! Filming with DSLR

Recommended Posts

Members,

Trying to get my head around imaging with a DSLR and read that a WEBCAM is actually better for planetary targets due to file size and weight therefore, can I hypothetically use a DSLR afocally but on the record video setting and still separate the frames afterwards, edit and stack? Or would they be too large?

9.25 AVX with Canon 550d Rebel2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Usually with a DSLR it is done at prime focus = no lens. Would suspect that results afocally (with eyepiece and DSLR lens) will give a poor result. In simple terms they were not ment to operate like that, although in theory they can. Half of getting a result afocally will be to have an idea of what the optics are doing.

You have to set the DSLR to take a video, then put the video on the PC and drag it into Registax, select the best frame and then stack the (say) 200 frames that best match this good one. Same with a webcam output - if you went down the webcam route you remove the lens on the webcam and again get the image direct onto the webcam sensor.

No idea why but it seems that a DSLR video tends to be less successful then a webcam, some cannot be read by the stacking software. But in general they have less success.

Theoretically you can do what you suggest but I think it may prove troublesome. Possibly brackets etc to hold the DSLR+lens may flex and in all this everything is assumed solid, unmovable and orthogonal.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Adaaam75 said:

Members,

Trying to get my head around imaging with a DSLR and read that a WEBCAM is actually better for planetary targets due to file size and weight therefore, can I hypothetically use a DSLR afocally but on the record video setting and still separate the frames afterwards, edit and stack? Or would they be too large?

9.25 AVX with Canon 550d Rebel2.

What I have learned it is the matter of sensor/pixel sizes not image sizes. DSLR has quite large sensor thus your imaging field of view is insanely large. You end up with image with lots of nothing and just one tiny part of your actual target. Webcams in the other hand have smaller sensor and they give more narrow field of view. You end up using your sensor more effectively. Your target fills your entire image and small pixels brings more detailed view.

You could try to use good quality barlow with your DSLR. Gives you better field of fiew towards planetary imaging.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a 550d so if videoing make use of the crop video mode that camera has you'll get much better results.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to start a topic on this, but I'm pleased to see there already is one, hope you don't mind me jumping in Adaaam. Looks like we're at the same stage in our astro-photography.

I've taken some film of Jupiter last night, for the first time ever,  using a DSLR through a barlow. At times, the image is pretty sharp, I can see cloud bands easily, and I'd like to see it stacked. I've never done stacking before, but I have Registax 5 (version 6 keeps freezing on my laptop). The first problem I have is my Canon has filmed them as MP4 files. I tried to convert to avi, but then there was a codec error.
Anyway, I did eventually get to stack an image, and was very impressed with the stabilisation, my film was all over the place. But no detail showed, but I think that's because I didn't select the best frame.

I'm new to DSLR photography, but I've seen some very pleasing Jupiter images with a DSLR, so I'm going to keep trying. If anyone's got any tips on converting a Mp4 video to avi I'd be very pleased to hear them. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading with avid interest, I too am at the same stage, and when I get my scope back in action want to try the same thing. 

29 minutes ago, Swithin StCleeve said:

Registax

Swithin StCleeve I've downloaded registax this morning, is it intuitive or will I need to read the manual?  FWIW I'm normally a dab hand with decent pre-built software packages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, happy-kat said:

You have a 550d so if videoing make use of the crop video mode that camera has you'll get much better results.

Happy Kat's right 640 x 480 Movie Crop Mode is what you want to use. The DSLR has smaller pixels than most webcams as well. If you use the movie crop mode you'll be able to use prime focus with a barlow instead of afocal.

http://www.astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/EQ_TESTS/Canon_One_To_One_Pixel_Resolution.HTM

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, JOC said:

Reading with avid interest, I too am at the same stage, and when I get my scope back in action want to try the same thing. 

Swithin StCleeve I've downloaded registax this morning, is it intuitive or will I need to read the manual?  FWIW I'm normally a dab hand with decent pre-built software packages.

I've not read the manual, I've been trying to do it intuitively, and it's not working for me. I haven't a clue what I'm doing, to be honest. I'm busy today, but I intend to have a good go with it tomorrow. Looks like this thread will be useful for a few of us. I've already learnt that I can set the camera to a Movie Crop. I'll do that next time I film, but I still want to use the film I did last night, if only to practice using registax. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,

I also use a 550D in 640X480 movie crop mode and I get good results with it. As far as Registax goes, I learned the basics from astronomyshed's video, hopefully it also works with Registax 5...

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use DSLR's so I'm not sure what the video format is. It's a good idea to run your file through this software:

https://sites.google.com/site/astropipp/

Choose the planetary option and it'll automatically crop and center the planet. It can also convert to different filetypes too.

I tend to stack with autostakkert:

http://www.autostakkert.com/wp/download/

And then import the stacked image to Registax for processing with wavelets.

There's plenty of guides for both programs online, I really do recommend Autostakkert, it's a lot easier to use than Registax,

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boy am I glad I asked that quickie! What a wealth of information I've already learned in an hour that I'd have had no idea about previously!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to try taking some video with my LUMIX G7 and a Celestron Ultima Duo eyepiece on some double stars th next clear night we get. I'm hopeful that, after getting the video converted to the right format, Registax will do me proud. Then I'll do some post production with rawtherapee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's what I managed to get out of the short film I took a couple of nights ago.

jupesc.jpg

I put the MP4 film through Pipp, which gave me the AVI file, and then stacked it using Autostakkert, then tweaked it in Registrax. It's the first time I've stacked anything, so I think I've not done bad, but obviously there's loads of room for improvement. Extra thanks to cuivenion for the links. They were a great help!
Anyone know why it's blue on the top right? (and it's a bit brown on the opposite side).

Edited by Swithin StCleeve
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey1 That's not bad for a first attempt is it?  I hope I can do as well when I have a go at it.  I am still telescope-less as my base isn't back from repair yet :-(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin StCleeve said:

Here's what I managed to get out of the short film I took a couple of nights ago.

jupesc.jpg

I put the MP4 film through Pipp, which gave me the AVI file, and then stacked it using Autostakkert, then tweaked it in Registrax. It's the first time I've stacked anything, so I think I've not done bad, but obviously there's loads of room for improvement. Extra thanks to cuivenion for the links. They were a great help!
Anyone know why it's blue on the top right? (and it's a bit brown on the opposite side).

You're welcome. Great first image! Regarding the blue, what scope are you using and if you are using a Barlow which one? It could be chromatic aberration caused by either. Budget barlows and refractors suffer from this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, cuivenion said:

You're welcome. Great first image! Regarding the blue, what scope are you using and if you are using a Barlow which one? It could be chromatic aberration caused by either. Budget barlows and refractors suffer from this.


I'm using a Newtonian with an 8" mirror, (Skywatcher). The Barlow came with the scope, so I'm betting it's not great. The eyepieces that came with it weren't as good as the old scruffy ones I used on my dobsonian years ago. The mirror needs collimating too, so perhaps that's not helping. I need to look at the planet through the scope without the Barlow, and see if the same effect happens. I'll get back to you.
The Jupiter image is pleasing to me, but I should imagine to the seasoned astro-photographer it's horrendous in many ways. But I'm not putting it up to impress anyone, I'm just saying "this is the first attempt" really. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Swithin StCleeve said:


I'm using a Newtonian with an 8" mirror, (Skywatcher). The Barlow came with the scope, so I'm betting it's not great. The eyepieces that came with it weren't as good as the old scruffy ones I used on my dobsonian years ago. The mirror needs collimating too, so perhaps that's not helping. I need to look at the planet through the scope without the Barlow, and see if the same effect happens. I'll get back to you.
The Jupiter image is pleasing to me, but I should imagine to the seasoned astro-photographer it's horrendous in many ways. But I'm not putting it up to impress anyone, I'm just saying "this is the first attempt" really. 

Much better than my first attempt. I would say its the barlow causing the blue fringing. I used to have a cheap skywatcher barlow that caused the same effect. Reflectors don't have CA, only lenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By lux eterna
      Hi all,
      This is 6 hours (30 x 12 min), taken with my modded Nikon D7000 @iso200 and Astronomik 12 nm Ha 2" filter on Meade LX200-ACF with reducer (=1600 mm FL @ F8). Guided with NexGuide on HEQ5 Pro.
      The plan was to do a Ha O3 bicolour on this target, but the O3 may be a future thing due to weather conditions.
      I usually remove the stars during part of my processing workflow and put them back later on, but this time I think the nebulosity and dust came out best without them. I did however try to find out which stars belong to Melotte 15 and include only those, just to portrait the Melotte 15 without anything between it and us, but I could not find that info.
      Processed with DSS, Starnet and PS.
      Ragnar

    • By LuminousCRO
      I was looking to get into astrophotography with my 10 inch dobson and for start would like to buy something affordable. Cameras can be used or new. Thanks in advance!
    • By jambouk
      We are running a session at my local society on transits and occultations. One station will focus on exoplanet transits, and we'd like to build a very simple model to demonstrate this. We have a star (light source) and an orbiting "planet" but I need to work out how to detect the changes in light intensity and display this on a laptop, like a classical transit photometry trace below (taken from https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/tess/primary-science.html).
      Is there a way to take a feed from a DSLR through the USB output to do this, else I could get an adapter for my ZWO and put an EOS lens on the front of that. I really do want a light intensity vs time trace in real time on the laptop. This model will be run in a darkened room.
      Thanks for any comments.
      James
       

    • By michaelmorris
      Computar 2.6mm F1.0 CCTV lens
      This high quality ultra fast ultra wide angle CCTV lens is great for use with a highly sensitive CCTV camera for video recording meteors.  These ultra fast lenses were discontinued by Computar several years ago and are now very rare. They originally sold for over $300 each.
      Excellent condition. Lenses free from scratches and internal dust. DC auto iris tested and working.
      £85 + £8 postage to UK mainland




    • By J47
      Hi my name is Jay, new to all and any forums, lol. Not sure where to start so here I go. I have a few questions about Sirius the double star while observing through my Nexstar 4se telescope using a 2x Barlow and my neximage burst color. While I was able to capture quite stunning results of the star Sirius, this morning before sunrise, I was curious though as to if I might have incorrectly focused my scope on the star or if this image is a clear image of the star? I will attach a brief 7-8 second video I took this morning. It was the first time I had gotten to focus my scope on the star as it kept drifting before but I solved the drifting issue as a result of improper anti-backlash. But now back to the video, was wondering if any of you could help determine if I properly focused on the star because from what I see the star appears to be in the shape of an out-of-control atom in the video and at the center it is black, is this the observing of a quasar? Thanks for all the help in advance if anyone stops by thanks for the time and efforts here's the video.
      star.avi
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.