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cuivenion

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About cuivenion

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    Sub Dwarf

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    Morecambe
  1. I've not got a problem with QHY personally, but I've seen much more recent posts than that I'm afraid.
  2. I've never used a QHY camera, but I have seen periodic posts on a few forums talking about driver problems.
  3. Yep, I've probably been a bit too ruthless with subs, and on other images as well, the processing on the second is pants as well I've been experimenting with starnet and dimmed the stars too much.
  4. Yeah, There was a lot of subs that were effected by thin cloud which raised the FWHM. I've always wondered if I should keep data like that or not. Guess I should unless star shapes are really bad.
  5. This was originally a four hour image taken in 2018. I've thrown about 2 1/2 hours of data away because the conditions on the second night of imaging weren't very good. Taken with a HEQ5 and 130pds with an asi224. The original image, 4 hours of exposure: The reprocess, 1 hour and 36 minutes: I'll definitely have to add more time to it. What do you guys think, better? worse? Go for something inbetween?
  6. Yes, the clutch only holds the RA in place with pressure, it's not a locking mechanism. It's designed like this so the gearing inside isn't damaged if it does get knocked.
  7. I'm sorry you have slow internet but I really don't see why faster internet can't be provided by more conventional means. I'm not going to pretend I'm clever enough to gauge the impacts on near earth asteroid observation, I'm going off studies such as the one from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. In addition the European Southern Observatory projects satellite mega-constellations may severely affect between 30 and 50 percent of observations taken by the Rubin Observatory. I have not seen one news report of a professional astronomer saying this isn't going to be a problem for them.
  8. Marty McFly's hoverboard and of course the time travelling delorean were my childhood sci fi wishes.
  9. It's 2020, where's my moonbase?
  10. I don't see how I can be missing the point when I've been directly quoting you. You say you're fine with amateur astronomy being impacted to achieve SpaceX's goals, but what about professional scientific observations? They will arguably be much more effected expecially near earth asteroid hunters, who from my understanding observe nearer to twilight than the rest of us. This is a point you've consistantly refused to answer. Here's an earlier post of yours: "Strictly speaking, the motivation is to provide funding to make Man an interplanetary species, just in case a lump of rock from the sky wipes us out. Our species is unique and leaving it on one planet to the vagaries of some random piece of rock is too risky. I'm comfortable with some home astronomers having their hobbies affected if that's the price." I would argue it's more important to see the random piece of rock coming in the first place which Starlink in it's current form will make a lot more difficult. Significant Mars colonies are still pie in the sky at this point and despite what you're saying I don't see any reason why they can't fund it without Starlink. Also I don't think Amazon and others will have such lofty goals. Regarding the reflectivity of the darksat they achieved a magnitude reduction of 55%, which sounds great until you realise it still leaves a big white streak through a photographic image.
  11. First point: 'You might as well complain about there being no true darkness and damn whoever put the Sun in the sky. Complaining about that wouldn't be as fashionable though.' 'Right, I'm off to throw rocks at my nearest airport....' 'I'm comfortable with some home astronomers having their hobbies affected if that's the price. ' That's making light of the issues you said you were aware of but don't acknowledge because they don't fit your argument. Refering to people as pearl clutching and venting fits that bill as well. Second point: I've read that the blackening paint didn't make a significant difference at all. However, If they manage to find an answer to the problem then great. Third point: Sorry, that still reads as; if you don't like it, tough. 'Starlink, and other mega-constellations, are an unfortunate fact of life. The FCC have issued the necessary licences to SpaceX (and also to LeoSat, Kepler and Telesat). They do not need to ask for anyone else's permission.' 'Now, rather than pearl-clutching and venting, we have to work with these companies to mitigate their impacts.' This is where you lose me. Throughout this thread you've been suggesting that the effects of starlink on astronomical observations are no big deal, nothing to worry about, but you're also suggesting that we work with SpaceX and others to mitigate their impacts. Either the the impacts are negligible or they aren't.
  12. So there is an impact that SpaceX are trying to mitigate? It's a bit strange that you've made light of issues that SpaceX themselves are trying to fix. I'd heard of earlier attempts to reduce the sats brightness that hadn't made a significant difference. The deployable visor sounds hopeful and shows that at least SpaceX are listening which is good. The rest of the post reads as, if you don't like it, tough. I've never been a fan of that argument.
  13. Zakalwe you seem to be trying to make out this is just about a few complainers in bobble hats in their backyard, starlink is going to effect (ironically) near earth asteroid detection as well as other scientific endeavours.
  14. We'll just tell all those fashionable astronomers at professional observatories to stop worrying then. The problem is going to get a lot worse once there's upwards 100,000 of these satellites, and to be honest I don't see the correlation between the position of the sun, darkness levels and a billionaire's vanity project ruining the night sky for the rest of us.
  15. I'm not really set up for drilling and tapping, so I bought a 6mm to 4mm flexible coupler, hopefully that will do the job. The o ring coupler probably would have worked, but I'm more comfortable with a bolted connection. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Flexible-shaft-coupling-joint-Stepper-Motor-Coupler-Connector-VARIOUS-SIZES/262814471837?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&var=561957397165&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649
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