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cuivenion

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About cuivenion

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  1. Thanks Laudropb.
  2. Thanks Astro Imp.
  3. That makes sense, I might give it a go then.
  4. I didn't think it would be possible to update it with future captures, but I suppose it's worth a try. Thanks for the kind words.
  5. Thanks guys. It is gutting about the missing pane, but there's a couple of lessons learned from this image. The main one being to orientate the camera properly so it's easier to overlap the different panes. I'll know better next time.
  6. The plan was to spend the night imaging Jupiter but the seeing was so good when I focused on the moon I couldn't resist doing a quick mosiac. Unfortunately I missed a bit as I was rushing it, but I still think it's worth uploading especially seen as it was taken through tree branches. Taken on ‎April ‎6, ‎2017, at ‏‎1:44:57 AM with a Skywatcher 200p on an AstroEQ Vixen GP. Camera was an Altair GPCAM, capture software was Sharpcap. It was processed with PIPP, Autostakkert, Registax, Microsoft Ice and GIMP 2.9. A 10 panel mosiac, best 60% of 948 frames. Click on the image for full resolution: stitch wavelets Final.tif
  7. Here's my processing workflow, copied from another post. 1. Load your avi into PIPP and select the planetary option, reorder the avi in quality order and do not discard any frames. Debayer if using RAW. 2. Load PIPP avi into Autostakkert and analyse. The best way to choose how may frames to stack is to run through the avi and see where the frame quality starts to degrade severely. In Autostakkert you can choose to both stack a number of frames and a percentage, so you can choose to stack say 300 and 80% and experiment with both images. 3. Open stacked image in Registax. Use auto colour correct. Autostakkert can RGB align while stacking, so no need for that in Registax. With the wavelets I only use the top three sliders, usually just the top one. I'm usually very aggressive with the top slider and max it out, then use the denoise and sharpen tabs in the top slider in increments to make adjustments. 4. Open the image in whatever image processing you use (I use gimp) and do your levels, curves, saturation, noise reduction, unsharp masking etc. Remember that when capturing you can push the histogram very high with Jupiter. I usually have it between 70-80%, if possible.
  8. What do they normally go for? Which model lens is it exactly? Great image, can't wait to see the full colour version.
  9. Won't load for me.
  10. Thanks, glad you found it helpful.
  11. No probs good luck!
  12. Hi, I would definitely stack more frames. The more frames, the higher the signal to noise ratio and the more aggressive you can be with wavelets in Registax, or whatever sharpening tool you use. Of course you need decent quality frames, but there shouldn't be that much of a quality dropoff until you get to the last quarter of the avi. Here's my processing workflow: 1. Load your avi into PIPP and select the planetary option, reorder the avi in quality order and do not discard any frames. Debayer if using RAW. 2. Load PIPP avi into Autostakkert and analyse. The best way to choose how may frames to stack is to run through the avi and see where the frame quality starts to degrade severely. In Autostakkert you can choose to both stack a number of frames and a percentage, so you can choose to stack say 300 and 80% and experiment with both images. 3. Open stacked image in Registax. Use auto colour correct. Autostakkert can RGB align while stacking, so no need for that in Registax. With the wavelets I only use the top three sliders, usually just the top one. I'm usually very aggressive with the top slider and max it out, then use the denoise and sharpen tabs in the top slider in increments to make adjustments. 4. Open the image in whatever image processing you use (I use gimp) and do your levels, curves, saturation, noise reduction, unsharp masking etc. Hope that helps.
  13. Hi, I was going to respond last night night and typed a long post out.... and then hit the wrong button and deleted it all. I'll get back to you later on today. I think you need to stack a lot more frames.
  14. Thanks Craney, I'll try to help. Just to be clear though the larger image is by far the best result I've had at that FL. I'm not rattling them off every night. I focus on one of Jupiters moons at about 400x in the Sharpcap preview and get it as small and bright as possible. Just adjust the gain or exposure if the moons are too faint. A 5x Barlow with a 200p will give a resolution of 0.15", but U.K seeing conditions don't often support that. A x2 or x3 Barlow is often the better choice. Unfortunately I've never used an SCT so I can't help you there. What scope and camera are you using?
  15. The 200p is quite versatile, it does catch the wind though, it's a bit of a sail.