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spaceman_spiff

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About spaceman_spiff

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Interests
    Astronomy; Astrophotography; Computational Neuroscience; Horology; Classical music; Hiking; Jogging, PS4!!!
  • Location
    Bury, Lancashire

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  1. Thanks RL, The filter does help a lot with removing LP and the blue halos but tbh the scope doesn't really produce a huge amount of chromatic aberration, maybe I got a good example from Skywatcher. Also, the evostar has a nice flat field and no other serious optical aberrations. However, at F/D = 8.3, it is slow and building up a decent image takes time. Dan
  2. From the album Photos from Bury

    Date 24/03/2017. The Globular cluster (M92) was my final target of the night. This image uses the same data as the previous stack of M92, except I only processed the central portion and enabled 2x drizzle. I also tweaked the colour balance to really show the different star colours. Weather: The sky was clouding up near the end of the night. Seeing was good. Wind was still strong (9-12mph) and I lost quite a few frames because of vibrations. Temperature was about 3-5 degrees. Optics and camera: Skywatcher Evostar 120 F/D=8.33 (Achromat) with a Baader UHCs filter (for removing light pollution). The camera was a IR-filter removed Canon 600D. Settings: 64 x 3 minute lights, 50 darks from library, 50 flats taken recently and 50 bias frames. ISO 800. Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 with extension pillar. Processing: The Lights and calibrations frames were processed using Deep Sky Stacker. I set the star detection thresholds to values that caught about 30-40 stars. The final images were stretched in RGB and I then balanced the histograms to retain white balance. Luminance was tweaked to show faint detail. 2X drizzle was enabled. I also used Gimp to add a selective Gaussian blur over a 5 pixel range to blend the RGB noise.

    © D Elijah

  3. From the album Photos from Bury

    Date 24/03/2017. The Globular cluster (M92) was my final target of the night. I normally spend time imaging M13 (just to the south of M92). However, I decided to dedicate the rest of the nights imaging to this lovely little globular cluster. It is quite a dense cluster that consists of two types of star (either pink white or jade green), I tried different RGB colour balances to bring out this difference. Also, the small and faint galaxies NGC 6332 and NGC 6336 are viable in the top right (RA+, DEC+) and top middle of the image repectively. Weather: The sky was clouding up near the end of the night. Seeing was good. Wind was still strong (9-12mph) and I lost quite a few frames because of vibrations. Temperature was about 3-5 degrees. Optics and camera: Skywatcher Evostar 120 F/D=8.33 (Achromat) with a Baader UHCs filter (for removing light pollution). The camera was a IR-filter removed Canon 600D. Settings: 28 x 3 minute lights, 50 darks from library, 50 flats taken recently and 50 bias frames. ISO 800. Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 with extension pillar. Processing: The Lights and calibrations frames were processed using Deep Sky Stacker. I set the star detection thresholds to values that caught about 30-40 stars. The final images were stretched in RGB and I then balanced the histograms to retain white balance. Luminance was tweaked to show faint stars. I also used Gimp to add a selective Gaussian blur over a 5 pixel range to blend the RGB noise.

    © D Elijah

  4. From the album Photos from Bury

    Date 23-24/03/2017. The Pinwheel galaxy (M101) was my second target of the night. It is a favourite of mine, being ever present and normally high in the sky. The gradient effect seen in my image of the Leo triplet is not present here because of the high altitude of M101. I spent the most time on M101 to try and coax as much detail from the edges of M101 and the other small galaxies in the image. Although faint, these smaller galaxies are viable, NGC 5477 is a small patch to the left (RA-) of M101, NGC 5473 is a dense patch in the top left of the image and NGC 5455 is a star like point of light just below (DEC-) M101. Weather: The sky was clear with good transparency and seeing. Wind was strong however and I lost quite a few frames because of vibrations. Temperature was about 3-5 degrees. Optics and camera: Skywatcher Evostar 120 F/D=8.33 (Achromat) with a Baader UHCs filter (for removing light pollution). The camera was a IR-filter removed Canon 600D. Settings: 64 x 3 minute lights, 50 darks from library, 50 flats taken recently and 50 bias frames. ISO 800. Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 with extension pillar. Processing: The Lights and calibrations frames were processed using Deep Sky Stacker. I set the star detection thresholds to values that caught about 30-40 stars. The final images were stretched in RGB and I then balanced the histograms to retain white balance. Luminance was tweaked to show faint detail.

    © D Elijah

  5. Good shot! Also, remember that the Skymax needs time to cool down. I normally see the performance improve dramatically after 1 hour of imaging. I also refocus often as it cools down. Good idea measuring the diameter of Jupiter to work out focal length - I use a 2x barlow with my Skymax but I have a feeling that the focal length is way greater than 3600mm. Dan
  6. From the album Photos from Bury

    Date: 23/03/2017. My first deep sky imaging session for over 4 months! I really had to take my time setting up since I was quite rusty with everything. I have had my eye on the Leo triplet for some time now and I took this as my chance. Unfortunately, it was much lower in the sky than I imagined when looking at Stellarium so I only had about 1 hour of imaging time before it was out of view. Another factor that night was the wind, I lost many frames because of movement, the guider did a reasonable job but I may have set it with too low aggressiveness - it took some time to get the camera back on target after the wind had disturbed the scope. Optics and camera: Skywatcher Evostar 120 F/D=8.33 (Achromat) with a Baader UHCs filter (for removing light pollution). The camera was a IR-filter removed Canon 600D. Settings: 18 x 3 minute lights, 50 darks from library, 50 flats taken recently and 50 bias frames. ISO 800. Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 with extension pillar. Processing: The Lights and calibrations frames were processed using Deep Sky Stacker. I set the star detation thresholds to values that caught about 30-40 stars. The final images were stretched in RGB and I then balanced the histograms to retain white balance. Luminance was tweaked to show faint detail. The halo around the Hamberger galaxy (NGC 3628) is within the image but too close the noise to show without ruining the image. I should also say that there is a slight gradient in sky background towards the bottom (-dec) part of the image that I have attributed to glare from neighbours houses. Overall, I'm very happy to be imaging the Deep black stuff again!

    © D Elijah

  7. Hi Chris, I'm not sure what you mean by muddy exactly, the stack looks good to me. Perhaps there is some smearing from Jupiter's rotation. Can you up the frame rate and shorten the recording time? Maybe try 640x480 at 300fps with a recording time of 30s, to give 9000 frames. Then use pipp to extract the best 2000 and then run them into Registax, this should give a sharp result. Also, maybe try a good Barlow lens to extract all the detail, with the 2700mm focal length, adding a Barlow will give a big image scale. HTH Dan
  8. Well I have the 150 Mak and I am very happy with it. I use it for narrow field imaging (Solar, Lunar and planetary). With a good Barlow, this little scope is capable of resolving excellent detail. Cool down time can be an issue sometimes, before doing imaging, I leave it in the garage to cool down but it still needs an hour or so before it is at its best. I have never needed to collimate it and defocused stars are still nice and symmetrical in the centre of the field (meaning it is well collimated). For video imaging I mount the Mak on an EQ5 pro, even with a Barlow this mount keeps things very nicely within the FoV. I can't comment of the C6, but I'm sure it is also a good performer. It's been around for a long time so there should be lots of reviews of it. HTH Dan.
  9. Thanks, Last night was clear but windy, my guide-scope had a tough time keeping everything on target. I haven't yet stacked any images, but I will upload images soon. TBH, given the windy weather, I would have probably got more out of the evening imaging Jupiter... Oh well... Dan
  10. Wow, thanks! Your comments are too kind. I struggle to see Io in the earlier frames but then it just pops out near to edge of Jupiter...I would like to know whether if the first frames were sharper I would have seen Io against Jupiter or whether it is just too difficult to see. Anyway, it's a beautifully clear night here tonight but I'm focusing on DSOs so Jupiter may have to wait for nest time! Dan
  11. Thanks Messier, The atmosphere really stabilised just as the GRS came into view. It was good fun (but a lot of work) capturing Jupiter and I have a new respect for the power of the Televue 2x Barlow. I will have another go at Jupiter soon. Dan
  12. Tomorrow night predicted to be clear and Moonless...a rare thing. I'm planning on imaging the Leo triplet, and later M92. Lets hope the weather holds.

    1. Messier 104

      Messier 104

      Good luck with skies spaceman. 

      look forward to seeing the final image.  

    2. spaceman_spiff

      spaceman_spiff

      Thanks, I'm feeling the pressure now :wink:

  13. I don't think its anything orbiting Jupiter, otherwise it would be in-line with Jupiter's axis of rotation. I would say you captured an artificial satellite transiting Jupiter...if that's true, it's a rare sight!
  14. Ok, that sounds more plausible. It goes to show the precision required in getting anything in that 2.75mm X 1.48mm rectangle! Dan
  15. Hi Tommohawk, I thought that for each displayed pixel in an 640X480 RGB image, a 4-pixel Bayer matrix was required on the sensor. Meaning the area on the sensor would be 4x larger. I could be wrong here. I use movie crop mode all the time and its quite amazing that my old eq5 mount can keep a target in this small region of the sensor for hours at a time even with my scope having an effective focal length of 3.2m! Dan