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eclipse in march.


DazC
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I know that the eclipse in march will be best seen from the Faroe Islands, but how far south will we be able to see a partial eclipse or even just the sky get slightly darker?

D.C

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I've been lucky enough to witness 2 total solar eclipses and have always been amazed at how advanced the eclipse needs to be for there to be any notable change in light quality.

I expect that at 90% that we'll be getting here in NW England will give the suns light a strange quality. Shadows can look strange too.

If it's a dull cloudy day the eclipse could pass without being noticed.

The sky won't get much darker and remember, always remember, however much of the sun is eclipsed it's still too bright to look at without protection. Get those eclipse glasses now while stocks last!

Only totality is safe to look at directly.

Here a link to a great tool. http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/SolarEclipsesGoogleMaps.html

Click on your location for any eclipse and it will give the details for your location.

Edited by Paul M
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Thank you both for your replies.

I didn't realise that the eclipse could be observed so far south.

I think I'll be purchasing a pair of eclipse glasses and hoping for clear skies.

D.C

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I was in Marazion in Cornwall for the 1999 total eclipse. The sun was mostly cloud covered through the event but the sky went really dark and all the lights came on around Mounts Bay and on St Michaels Mount. It was a magical few minutes and I'm so glad I was able to enjoy it with my family on that crowded Cornish beach :smiley:

I'm looking forward to the partial one leater this year though and hopefully obeserving it with a few SGL mates ! :smiley:

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I noticed during the partial in 1999 that the quality of light to me did seem strange. It got appreciably duller but in a different way to clouds or twilight. The light wasn't at all diffused but continued to give a hard light and sharply defined shadows.

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I was in Marazion in Cornwall for the 1999 total eclipse. The sun was mostly cloud covered through the event but the sky went really dark and all the lights came on around Mounts Bay and on St Michaels Mount. It was a magical few minutes and I'm so glad I was able to enjoy it with my family on that crowded Cornish beach :smiley:

I'm looking forward to the partial one leater this year though and hopefully obeserving it with a few SGL mates ! :smiley:

I was a few miles up the road in Truro and it's great hearing someone else enjoying the '99 eclipse in  Cornwall (we offer cheap rate phone calls to heaven as such calls are all local lol).  In Truro, we didn't have a clould problem at all but there was the eerie feeling that others have described and I recall the local duck population settling down on the mud flats under the hull of a boat and tucking their heads under their wings.  It was a great day and I wasn't even into astronomy back then!

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And colder too!

I'm wondering about this for school on March 20th, the maximum is at 9.30 ish.

Might have to buy a box of solar glasses. :)

I'm working on some resources for schools for this event.  The aim is to do some things for the SGL event at Madley, but also make available things for schools to do both on the day and later too (either just normal solar-related or using archive/online solar pictures/data/videos).  They'll be linked to National Curriculum.

What age do you teach? and would you be prepared to have a look at my ideas and give me feedback (I will be developing them over the next couple of weeks)

Thanks

Helen 

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I'm working on some resources for schools for this event.  The aim is to do some things for the SGL event at Madley, but also make available things for schools to do both on the day and later too (either just normal solar-related or using archive/online solar pictures/data/videos).  They'll be linked to National Curriculum.

What age do you teach? and would you be prepared to have a look at my ideas and give me feedback (I will be developing them over the next couple of weeks)

Thanks

Helen 

I'd be really interested in any of your resources too Helen - I will be getting my primary school out to see it.  We were discussing it yesterday and the kids are really excited - hoping for clear skies now!

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Primary, but I'm the general school astronomy nerd, so would be happy to look at anything you were prepared to put together for any primary class.

Love the idea of being the school astronomy nerd!!  One of my kids asked today  "Are we doing astronomy this afternoon then?"  Great to link it in when we can   :grin:

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I was in Marazion in Cornwall for the 1999 total eclipse. The sun was mostly cloud covered through the event but the sky went really dark and all the lights came on around Mounts Bay and on St Michaels Mount. It was a magical few minutes and I'm so glad I was able to enjoy it with my family on that crowded Cornish beach :smiley:

I'm looking forward to the partial one leater this year though and hopefully obeserving it with a few SGL mates ! :smiley:

Hi John, I too was in Marazion in 99 and so glad I went. The birds went boo-loo for a while then silence as the eerie darkness came upon us. We stood out on the rocks and led the cheering. 

The day before the eclipse we were watching Sir Patrick delivering an interview on the beach. We were perched above him in the beer garden at the pub when a guy at the table next to us stripped off naked and went running down the beach in front of the camera. Sir Patrick stopped talking, watched the streaker, raised an eyebrow and just carried on as though nothing had happened. 

Hope nobody gets any ideas at SGLX  :shocked:

Paul 

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Glad I picked up a couple of solar glasses from the North West Astro Fest. This eclipse is so close, yet so far, as totality is concerned anyway. The Faroe Islands will be full to bursting and there is a high chance of cloud spoiling the view otherwise I might make the effort to go there.

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I see various Lines are offering eclipse cruises and they all seem to be putting into the Faroe's for the eclipse. 

Looking at the itineraries there will be a lot of boats milling round the North Atlantic in mid March.

Rather them than me! I'll make do with 90%. It's by far the deepest eclipse I've seen in the UK and not to be sniffed at :)

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One interesting thought is that its far enough north for a few decent aurora.

Mind you, that also depends on a clear sky.... Could be even wetter than cornwall.

Sent from my iPhone so excuse the typos!

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One interesting thought is that its far enough north for a few decent aurora.

Mind you, that also depends on a clear sky.... Could be even wetter than cornwall.

Sent from my iPhone so excuse the typos!

I was wondering about the possibility of seeing an aurora during totality but I don't think the sky will be dark enough and the Auroral Oval  is generally most intense opposite the sun, i.e. on the night side.

Wouldn't want to miss totality by looking for an aurora anyway!

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