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Photosbykev

SGL 8 - Starry video and Clouds videos (final)

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finally sorted out the videos on my desktop machine so I could get the colour balance right

Starry skies - 1000 x 5 second exposures over 90 minutes

and 2480 raw exposures make up this Cloud timelapse over 8 hours

as always best viewed on Youtube in full screen

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Great stuff Kev... :icon_salut:

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Nice work Kev...

I'm glad those who stayed behind got some clearish skies....

Peter...

Sent from my GT-P7300 using Tapatalk HD

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