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Found 34 results

  1. As many others, I was out taking pictures of the Lunar Eclipse this Friday. Though the moon didn't rise until half way through the eclipse, and clouds coming in just as it rose above the horizon, it cleared out and I gave it a go! I hadn't planned doing an actual time-lapse, hence why the exposure length and color balance is all over the place. Not until I sat down and had a look at the pictures at least. Some of them I tried to fix with Photoshop, but it was honestly a very big task at hand, so I only did minor adjustments, and then just added the some stills at the end of it. But have a look if you like! As always simply observing the eclipse was also a treat, and this was only my second time watching one! Thanks for watching. Next time I will definitely try to actually properly prepare for a timelapse, instead of just smashing whatever pictures I captured together
  2. bottletopburly

    Evening Descending-St George Island

    From the album: Imaging Challenge #16 - Inspirational Skies

    Timelapse St. George’s Island Cornwall , ipnone5s timelapse approx 3hrs ,
  3. Finally a clear night and some good images grabbed with my DIY All Sky Camera. All stitched together in Light Room and the resulting video stuck up on YouTube and now linked to here Hopefully it will be clear again soon and can get some more good timelapses. Shame I am not further north with a possibility of an aurora, but hey ho. Thanks for looking
  4. hi Recorded this over evening of 18th Jan to 19th Jan 2018, circa 2889 frames each of 12 second exposure, merged into video lasting about 3m 12secs. Big meteor at 1m17secs Recorded using Starlight Xpress Oculus all Sky Camera 180deg lens and AllSkeye Software. Note this is the video of the whole night, related to previous submission of just 1 frame of big meteor, although wasn't sure if should put in same or new post. thanks Jamie 19th .mp4 Edit: for those that dont want to download whole file, same one have uploaded to youtube if easier although lower quality:
  5. GIFV version - http://i.imgur.com/71aFPTQ.gifv My first try at time-lapsing. The Moon & Aldebaran Comparison between Aldebaran and The Sun Connected my iPhone to a 25mm eyepiece (Skywatcher 10") with a DIY adapter.Took a picture about every 30 seconds for something like 20 minutes (probably 18).Aligned each frame in Photoshop (since I couldn't figure out how to let PiPP align it on the star), and cropped a bit.It was taken under a very thin layer of fine clouds, although there's one frame in there where the clouds decided to get thick.
  6. Hi everyone. I recently acquired a ZWO ASI120MC-S and so with the bright summer skies I've turned towards solar and planetary lately. I'm not great at either, but I'm learning This is the result of my efforts from last night and I'm quite pleased with how it turned out given it was ~3-4 hours of sitting in the relative cold of my front garden. I've never managed to time weather & my availability with the GRS or a Jovian moon transit before so that's two firsts for me. The seeing was "soupy" to put it lightly, especially towards the end when the planet got lower in the sky and ended up over the roof of a house across the road, but I can't complain - at least it was clear! I took a video around every 5 minutes for almost 2 hours, stacked the best frames, then compiled into an animation of 19 frames that loops back & forth. Io started off about 1/3 of the way across the face of the planet when I started recording data so it's a bit tough to see but you can follow it back across once it pops out the other side. Thanks for looking! I hope the attachment works correctly because I couldn't seem to get the gif size down below ~14mb, so I apologise to anyone on a slow connection! Imgur link for the animation: http://imgur.com/HN2HuGn Gear: Skywatcher Skyliner 200P 8" newt with Skywatcher 3x 3-element barlow (3600 mm, f/18) Skywatcher NEQ6-Pro Synscan (unguided) ZWO ASI120MC-S camera Acquisition & Processing: - 19 individual images spaced approximately every 5 minutes from 21:55 to 23:45 BST - Firecapture [gain = 55-65, exposure = 20-25 ms, 960x960 1x1 bin] - 4500-5000 frames per image @ 45-50 FPS - Best 500 frames stacked per image in Autostakkert!2 - Wavelets and colour balance in Registax 6 - GIF created in Photoshop CC
  7. I just finished to work on the data of 2 weeks ago. The animation represent a close up portion of the Sun of 4 May. Images taken with a 100 ed refractor using a Daystar h-alpha filter at a focal of 2200mm, I reduced the focal do to a terrible seeing. I decided to follow for a couple of hours the NOAA 1734 zone, the bigger one of the week with the hope to catch a big X flares like the yeasterday one. Even if the seeing and the video compression had blured alot of details, the filaments and spicules movements are evident, also a couple of mini flares are visible during the time-lapse. Hope in bigger one next time. The mosaic instead was captured the last weekend at the same focal of 2200, 6 images at different exposure for disc and proms (click on it for the zoom). I also captured a serie of movies to assemble a time-lapse of the prominence, but still on working.
  8. I was lucky enough to spend two weeks on La Palma in the Canary Islands this August with my family. Whilst we were unlucky with the weather in the first week (it rained, was cloudy and the air was very dusty blowing across from the Sahara) the second week was much better with some stunning skies and views to be seen. My original plans for various time-lapses was thrown out of sync (not entirely unusual for any UK based astronomer) and I ended up with just 4-5 nights to capture what really needed about 8-9. Whilst there's a lot I couldn't do, I was able to get a fair amount including two nights up in the vicinity of the Observatories on the Roque de Los Muchachos. Some of La Palma's most striking views involve clouds - the Caldera de Taburiente (a stunning sight from wherever you look) regularly fills up with clouds looking like a bubbling cauldron and sometimes clouds cascade over the Cumbre Nueva - a mountain ridge across the middle of the island. This ridge often holds back those clouds - it's not unusual to drive from the sunny west side through a tunnel onto the east side where it's cloudy, raining and much cooler. I was able to capture a quick time-lapse of clouds cascading over the Cumber Nueva from the Mirador El Time whilst enjoying a coffee at the cafe there. It doesn't get much better than that!! The earlier time-lapses were captured in the vicinity of the villa we stayed in, El Sitio in Fagundo, Puntagorda. Some of the later ones were captured at the 'Hacienda La Palma' from about 4500ft (1370m) altitude and some from in or around the Roque de Los Muchachos. The skies at Hacienda La Palma and up at the Roque were stunning with virtually no light pollution. Even lower areas had skies far better than usually seen in the UK. Phenomenon such as the Zodiacal light (where dust particles along the plane of the ecliptic are illuminated) were very obvious and whereas in the UK the predominant colour I have to process out of images taken is orange from light pollution, in La Palma the skies' natural green glow was very obvious in my images. That said, La Palma is a cloudy island - most of the clear nights in my second week there were due to my being at higher altitude. It was a common sight to see overcast skies hundred of metres below but not a cloud above. This video is a compilation of some of the time-lapses I did get. I made plenty of mistakes on these time-lapses, not least I should perhaps have gone when there was more moonlight to light up the ground a bit, a little different from the approach to astroimaging we're more used to.. all the more reason to go back and try them again of course Hope you enjoy.. don't forget to make sure the HD button is on when watching and turn the sound up, or down depending on preference Kate and the kids are visible in a couple of spots, I deliberately left them in - but I removed the selfie taken at the top of the Roque de Los Muchachos just after sunrise one morning as I looked about 90!!! Four sleepless nights hadn't done me any favours! Equipment: I used a Canon 6D, modded Canon 650D, 24-105mm Sigma lens, 14mm f/2.8 Samyang Lens and a 8mm Samyang Fisheye. Tracking and panning were done using a Vixen Polarie with a time-lapse adaptor. https://vimeo.com/139641078
  9. After the break to the mountain which I have dedicated to elaborate a bit of the material filed in time, I can finally go back to photograph. 22th morning, the sky would be especially transparent and clean, thanks to the storm of the night and although the meteo told about terrible seeing I wanted to try anyway due to the presence of some beautiful formations on the Sun. To my surprise the turbulence was almost absent at the begining, and I could capture sequence of images tho assemble the mosaics, but these are enough to exhaust the lucky seeing, and when I was setting the camera for the timelapse I already saw the first signs of deterioration which are then fulfilled during the shooting sequence. I tried to continue anyway stopping after just over an hour, even after a couple of hours I didn't see any improvements so I decided to dismantle everything and see what I could pull out of the collected material. In fact, this time, since next to one of the brightest prominences were visible a few spots and filaments, I wanted to try a totally different settings that allowed me to capture both the prominence that the details on the disk, which is always tricky with narrow filters. If it will happen again I'll have to keep exposure times longer to have more data on the weak details; in post processing then I had to study a totally different approach and I have had to duplicate each frame in order to be treated differently the disk and prominence starting from the same shoot. A faster method would be to work on shadows and light but noticing a loss of some points on the histogram I have taken the long way and hardworking. Since then the highly variable seeing I had to change the stacking and the final processing to try to normalize the level of detail as much as possible, I must admit that it was a work particularly long, because I has precluded the use of certain macros that usually use. Although at the end of the capture there weren't any cataclysmic events the level of detail at full resolution is good and if you focus on portions of the video and not only to the overview, you can see micro movements and evolutions. In particular I'm curious about the migration of certain points of greatest intensity next the main spot group NOAA 1820 more visible in the negative version, I usually think about Ellerman bombs but this ones were moving from the umbra and follow the filament/spicules and makes me wonder if by chance it is not a case of those phenomena recently discovered by UCLan university and still under study, in which they occur condensations of energy along the magnetic field of the spicule / filaments which radiate from sunspots by traveling in their length. Unfortunately the compression of Youtube has mixed some of the details but I hope you will enjoy it anyway. Youtube Channel
  10. I've been going to star parties for about 10 years now and more recently have taken up time lapsing - partly to get around the lack of clear skies (time lapsing isn't as dependent on completely clear skies as regular astro-imaging is) and partly as it means less kit to cart around... although I now seem to have accumulated too much again. Attached is a time-lapse I've put together of several timelapses taken at Kielder Star Camp last year, spring and autumn, and this years spring event we've just had. Star parties are about the stars/astronomy of course, but are also social events (it's usually cloudy after all) and it' always great to catch up with old friends and make new ones. But... if the skies are clear get things get very busy! The most recent star camp was warm and sunny over the Saturday and Sunday (rather rare!). When it's looking pretty likely it will be clear everyone is out making sure their setups are working, batteries are charged and so on and there's usually a general sense of anticipation that builds as it gets dark. These timelapses show the red lights used by astronomers (red light doesn't ruin your night vision) and if you are sensitive to flickering lights maybe don't watch the time-lapse :) I hope you enjoy this... it's been enjoyable (albeit cold!) capturing the timelapses although processing them afterwards can be a time consuming pain ;) If you've got a fast internet connection its best to watch the time-lapse in at least HD (1080p) - 4K is better. Detaily stuff... Most taken with a Canon 6D, 25 second exposures at ISO3200 using a Samyang 14mm lens. Orion picture taken with an astro-modded Canon 650D. Processed in Lightroom with LRTimelapse. James PS Looking forward to the SGL star party in the autumn
  11. A big quiescent prominence suddenly start to detach from the Sun disc, in few minutes it reach huge dimensions but with lower luminosity, the structure is dissolving with the magnetic lines. I could capture few moments of the event tuning gamma and exposure at each frame to compensate its fast evolution. The transparency was bad, a milky sky, but the seeing was better and let me to take few good frames even if I had to shorten the movies more then usual. I saw the start of this liftoff on sdo website and decide to set as fast as possible the telescope, if i a checked it only half an hour first i could had follow the event since the start, but it is also true that 20 minutes after I would have seen nothing so I don't complain a lot eheh Here you can watch at a high resolution mosaic of the prominence. and few other prominence of that day. The animation represent a close up portion of the Sun of June taken with a 100 ED refractor using a Daystar h-alpha filter at a focal of 2000mm. Hope you like it, comments and questions are welcome and subscribe to my Youtube channel to see many more. YouTube Channel
  12. The last weekend I should have not use the telescope, I was sick at home but when I saw this big prominence online I decided to collect my last energy and try. The prominence has few turbulent evolutions and seem to start a detaching movement instead it stay there twisting on itself. This time I presented the timelapse in 4 different color, every personal taste should be pleased. Comments and questions are welcome, and if you enjoyed the movie visit my video channel. YouTube Channel
  13. Here my last video. You can watch at the evolution of a solar image through several stages of processing, from what you usually see in the telescope up to what you find in the final image. The effect of seeing of the first clip is evident and even if there are few moments where you can understand the structure and details, they are ususally blured by turbolence; in the frames stacking you already notice a superior quality, no noise or turbolence, while in the wavelet stage you can finally discover the inner details normally not visible. The last animation is the final work, colored and tuned to show better. I used as subject a close up portion of the Sun of 26 May with the evolution of a huge prominence during an hour of observation. Images taken with a 100 ed refractor using a Daystar h-alpha filter at a focal of 2000mm. Hope you enjoy it and will follow my channel. Follow YouTube Channel
  14. It occured to me that I should share with you the timelapes of this year's Mercury transit as seen from Czech Republic. The clouds have parted for some 20 minuts, allowing me to capture this timelapse. I shot it with a modified webcam, Baader 2.25x Barlow and UV/IR cut filter, using my former SW MAK 102/1300.
  15. Photosbykev

    Lunar Eclipse timelapse (final)

    3 cameras, 6 hours of shooting, 2000 images and a heap of post processing best viewed on Youtube full screen HD
  16. 700 x 6 second exposures. Captured during the timelapse were a tumbling satellite and an aircraft contrail casting a shadow onto the clouds Best viewed on Youtube in HD
  17. The sky was not entirely clear and I hoped for a good seeing with the absence of winds, and in fact in the first half hour watching at the eyepiece was significantly better than the last attempts of this year 2014, but still far from the standard to which I was accustomed a year ago. I then made ​​some capture at lower focal on prominences and main formations and then decided to capture the evolution of the one that seems most interesting, a beautiful tree shape quiescent prominence, it was persistent for several hours, but get involved by a magnetic twister born from the next active region. During the shooting the left side of the prominence was teared off by a magnetic vortex which disturbs the structure turning it around horizontally, while the right side, out of the reach of turbulent magnetic field, it remains inactive and almost untouched. Unfortunately the seeing was quite terrible as soon I started to image but I was interested in the prominence evolution so I continued filming it; even if the details are blured the movements of the plasma is clear and understandable. Images taken with a custom 150 truss refractor using a Daystar h-alpha filter at a focal of 2500mm, the video show 1 hour of real time. Video Waiting for better times I hope you like it, I attach also some shots made ​​in the beginning when the details were at least partially visible.
  18. While I was exploring the Sun disc looking for a good subject I found this small active zone next the limb, that was erupting, I decided to follow its fast closure with short captures, infact after only 10 minutes the event was ended. To build the movie then I added a second surge prominence I captured few months ago. As you can see also from the Earth scale, the sujects this time are very small events, like micro surge, spicules eruption, all watchable only on the edge of the disc with very fast capture and lower exposure respect to the filming of normal prominence. Usually they are burn and overexposed losing any details. You can also see plasma falling from the other side of the Sun. YouTube compression blur many of the details but I hope you will like it. If you enjoy the movie, click the like button or subscribe to my channel. YouTube Astro Channel
  19. Hello, This is my first Milky Way timelapse Canon eos 1200d with kit lens 18-55mm. Made 212 shots at 25s exporsure iso 3200.
  20. The day after I received my new camera the Sun gave the show with this huge prominence, and although I eventually had several driver issues, I managed to follow its evolution for half an hour before the sky completely veiled. I hope you will enjoy. At the end uninstalling the 13.1.7 drivers and installing the 13.1.6 High Performance Driver seems to have solved the high instability of the camera, which freezed each time. There remains the problem of newton interference bands. I forgot, here you can instead see the mosaics that I made before the timelapse, during the tests. http://www.flickr.co...lvy/9332248461/ http://www.flickr.co...lvy/9332248765/ http://www.flickr.co...lvy/9335037034/ PS - last week I forgot to post the video of the most spectacular events, here it is.
  21. finally sorted out the videos on my desktop machine so I could get the colour balance right Starry skies - 1000 x 5 second exposures over 90 minutes and 2480 raw exposures make up this Cloud timelapse over 8 hours as always best viewed on Youtube in full screen
  22. Hey all. My interest in timelapse has been building over the last couple of years. After an attempt to do some at SLG 11, this has been something that has been bubbling on the back burner for a long time. My interest has once again risen in getting this going as I now have what I think will be a fairly nice setup for doing Day to night (Holy Grail) time lapses. Here's the kit that I'll be using..... 1. Canon 70D 2. Sigma 17-50mm Zoom lens at F2.8 (Over the whole range) 3. 2 axis camera slider 4. iPhone/iPad - running qDslrDashBoard 5. Lens muff - and single use hand warmers This setup fits together rather nicely. The slider that I have does Move-Shoot-Move, after moving it will trigger the camera via the shutter release cable. (I could use an intervalometer for this, the slider has the feature built in so no need to complicate things even more.) The Canon 70D will be mounted on the slider on a ball mount. It connected to the iPhone/iPad over WIFI (I thought that was a gimick at first). the iOS device will be running qDslrDashboard which will perform the settings tweaking for the Holy grail stuff. The Sigma Lens at F2.8 will be faster than my kit lens (F4.5) The Lens muff, will be wrapped around the sigma lens and have 3 single use hand warmers (lasts 10 hours) to keep dew away from the glass. All in all, I'm getting rather excited to trying this out
  23. Jonk

    Orion timelapse

    From the album: Jon's images

    Quick Orion timelapse, Saturday the 14th of March, back garden in Southsea. Stock Canon 70D + Astronomik CLS clip filter, 14mm Samyang lens, f2.8, iso 3200, 22s each shot. MP4 doesn't play well on here so it was converted to a gif...not great either!
  24. Seeing was mostly poor, but I am quite happy with how it came out
  25. After few days of rain and storms the weekend of 4th was clear with only few small clouds passing through. The seeing was average and with a Sun with so many prominence (my favorite subject) i couldn't resist and spent several hours of saturday and sunday imaging. I just finished to work at the data, in the clip you will find the best prominence captures and a timelapse of the huge one, which keep us entertained for two long days. I suggest to see the HD version to better enjoy the spicules details. Hope you like it, all captured at 3 - 3.5 meter. Video HD The presence of few promninence next the bigger one suggested to make a big mosaic (3500px) of the big system. Full resolution Here few of the images, you can find all of them also in colored version on Flickr Full resolution An huge tornado Full resolution Full resolution In the afternoon I also run at the neighbour town to capture a fast ISS transit.
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