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My existing sky and telescope atlas is starting to fall to bits, had it 8 years and last time out I accidently left it overnight in the garden when the dew was horrendous. It has gone very cardboardy now so think it's time I got a new one.

The sky and telescope atlas was highly recommended when I obtained it way back so just wondering is that still the preferred choice amongst members or has anything new come along that is better (subjectively of course)

Steve.

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I guess you're referring to the Pocket Sky Atlas? Yes, that's still a great reference, there's even a Jumbo edition with the same contents but larger charts. But it doesn't go very deep. Based on your equipment, I'd suggest to find a copy of the Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas. Thousands of deep-sky objects and double stars, all classified so you can easily see if your targets are within reach of your scope. There's also a rugged Field edition, perfect for use in humid or cold circumstances.

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1 hour ago, Waddensky said:

I guess you're referring to the Pocket Sky Atlas? Yes, that's still a great reference, there's even a Jumbo edition with the same contents but larger charts. But it doesn't go very deep. Based on your equipment, I'd suggest to find a copy of the Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas. Thousands of deep-sky objects and double stars, all classified so you can easily see if your targets are within reach of your scope. There's also a rugged Field edition, perfect for use in humid or cold circumstances.

I had looked at the desk edition (although I know I want field) at FLO. It does sound quite comprehensive but there are quite mixed reviews of it on other sites. The publishers own website is very detailed though and i have played around with the sample pages. I found a few minor star discrepancies but nothing major. Also quite costly so I need to think this one over and see if there are any other options or ideas forth coming.

Steve.

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Posted (edited)

There's the jumbo pocket sky atlas you could consider. Then there's the Cambridge Star Atlas or Cambridge Double Star Atlas. And there's always a trusty Norton's Star Atlas.  I've had three Sky Atlas's over the years and found them a bit too big to handle comfortably in the field. They are also rediculously expensive these days and really aren't worth the cost IMHO. 

Edited by mikeDnight

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I still have and frequently use the small format Pocket Sky Atlas. I had Interstellarium and the All Sky Edition of Uranometria but found that I didn't use them much so I moved them on.

Recently I have been finding Stellarium or Cartes du Ciel very useful. My laptop is always close to where I observe from so it's easy to refer to those. Stellarium goes down to mag 15.

I have some apps like Sky Safari etc as well but I don't tend to have my mobile when I'm observing.

 

 

 

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I have actually just carried out repairs on my existing copy of S&T, it's 9 by 7 inch, not sure if that's classed as the pocket version. I will wait for the glue to dry to see if it still serviceable.

I have never bothered taking a laptop, occasionally use the phone one for stellarium but not often.

One option I am playing with is that I am ok at finding roughly where the objects are in the sky in terms of AZ, finding the right elevation I find more difficult. There are gadgets that help with the latter which are quite accurate, a kind of push to lite.

However I do want to do far more hopping and not rely on technology as much. As it stands it's probably 30/70 star hop/pushto, I would like to reverse this ratio.

Steve

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1 hour ago, mikeDnight said:

There's the jumbo pocket sky atlas you could consider. Then there's the Cambridge Star Atlas or Cambridge Double Star Atlas. And there's always a trusty Norton's Star Atlas.  I've had three Sky Atlas's over the years and found them a bit too big to handle comfortably in the field. They are also rediculously expensive these days and really aren't worth the cost IMHO. 

I looked not long ago and the Jumbo Pocket Atlas doesn't appear to be available new, only on the used market for silly prices.

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I love my Pocket Sky Atlas for generally checking out locations. However, it does not go deep enough. I have the Uranometria which is very good but much prefer the Interstellarum which I place on a large music stand next to the 12" Dob. I don't have the Field edition but after I locate the DSO I place the atlas back into a large plastic box to save it getting too wet with dew.

Although its expensive the pleasure I get from finding objects more easily outweigh the initial cost.

 

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Sky safari is a good app maybe another string to your bow 

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Use the Pocket Sky Atlas, some years ago I got some self adhesive clear sheets. Covered each page and the outer edges. Heavy in weight , but has been out in the wettest dew . Very useful cladding , as you can use marker pens on the pages and wipe off later,

Nick.

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On 18/05/2020 at 20:02, bomberbaz said:

I have actually just carried out repairs on my existing copy of S&T, it's 9 by 7 inch, not sure if that's classed as the pocket version. I will wait for the glue to dry to see if it still serviceable.

 

Repair seems good. I did however use a water based glue so somehow got to figure how to laminate this or similar. 

The other atlas's look great, but see how I get on with this first. 

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I don't want to publicly admit how many atlases I've got but I would recommend the following...

The sky and telescope pocket sky atlas is my favourite small atlas for visual. Interstellarium is my favourite detailed map.

A third good choice is the Cambridge Double Star Atlas. Ot may sound specialist but the maps are great for general use and it highlights double stars as well as all the popular dso's and so makes a lot more targets accessible using a single map.

Having said all that I now use sky safari in the field most of the time and generally only use maps for planning or to look up objects I am reading about.

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