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travelyourlife

any suggestion for a site for astrophotography about 2h from Menlo Park (CA)?

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Hi there!

I hope you can help, I'll be in the Bay Area for a bunch of days and I thought to try some astrophotography.

 

Could you please suggests some location options to do some astrophotography in California, ideally not further than 2-2.5h from Menlo Park?

 

Thank you!
Tom

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I can't provide helpful information. I'm just excited to see another California observer on this primarily UK site.

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